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Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900), philosopher
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick

Letter of 16 Dec. 1865 a copy of a letter of recommendation for Henry Jackson. Accompanied by notes on Sidgwick sent to [Leslie?] Stephen, and the printed "Report of the Proceedings at a Meeting for Promoting a Memorial of the Late Henry Sidgwick" in the Cambridge University Reporter dated 7 Dec. 1900.

Three black and white photographs of Henry Sidgwick

One oval portrait, wearing a long jacket and trousers, bow tie and watch and chain, seated in an ornate chair, with one arm resting on a table, with his hand on a book. Two cartes de visite: one of Henry Sidgwick, wearing a long dark jacket and light-coloured trousers, seated on a chair in front of a wall ornamented with plaster-work, with his hand resting on two books, which lie on a covered table; the second is of the head and shoulders of Henry, with a long beard and wearing a dark jacket. According to Henry Jackson [103/59], one of the cartes de visite was taken by [Jules] Guggenheim in Oxford.

Also a blank card with 'Newnham College, Cambridge' printed on it, and an envelope addressed to Nora Sidgwick, postmarked 1907-07-10.

Letter from E. E. Bowen to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to [J. A.?] Cruikshank, and predicts that Sidgwick 'will like him'. Mentions Sidgwick's German expedition; encourages him to keep up his German and refers to a translation of [Ewald]. Invites him to come to visit on the following Sunday week, and states his intention of going to Cambridge sometime during the term. Refers to an acquaintance from Cheltenham. Expresses regret at [Cowell]'s illness. Reports of being engaged in a review of [Harkinson], which is very taxing. Mentions the few days spent with Cruikshank, and also time spent playing cricket in the Isle of Wight.

Bowen, Edward Ernest (1836-1901) schoolmaster

Letter from E. E. Bowen to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to Sidgwick being in Scotland, and to the fact that Tawney is there with him. Reports that he wrote to [Edmund Henry or Frederic Horatio] Fisher, 'telling him of matters [Sidgwick] could naturally be interested in hearing about'. Regrets his absence, and that of 'Fish', '[ ]' and 'Brandreth', and states that 'Cambridge was shamefully represented'. Expresses his delight with Sidgwick's D[ ], and asks him what he intends to write for Christmas. Refers to Sidgwick's 'Epigram', and that of Trevelyan, Holmes and [Hope] Edwards. Expresses his intention of going to the sea soon, and of going to Brandreth for a few days. Refers to his reading of Tacitus and Plato. Reports that he tells every old Cambridge man he meets 'about the Commission, that they have [sent] down the statutes, not only [ ] the celibacy of the fellows, but actually establishing a community of women!' Intends to spend September at Trinity College. Disappointed by the news of another fellowship vacancy, 'if not two, which must delight the heart of J. W. Clarke, but spoils the chance for next year.' Refers to Cooper having taken [Kendal], George B[urn] Hatfield, and [Thomas William?] Hardy 'that little living with the hard name near Cambridge' [Shudy Camps?]. Complains that the sizeable number of Oxford men there 'bore one to death', and reports that one of them is going to read with Sidgwick's brother [Arthur or William?]. Sends his regards to H[ ] and Tawney, and congratulations to the latter on his [ ].

Bowen, Edward Ernest (1836-1901) schoolmaster

Letter from E. E. Bowen to Henry Sidgwick

Praises Sidgwick as a correspondent. Thanks him for the [Tripos Verses in a letter of Jan. 1859], which are, in Bowen's opinion, 'quite up to the mark and as classical as Trevelyan's'. Asks for 'certain stanzas in [ ] metre, and asks for news of 'what will be going on in whose rooms Saturday week.' Announces intention of coming up 'some Sunday'. Mentions 'an essay of [Lowell's], and asks when the dinner is. Espresses desire that 'all three' of them are going from Harrow this time. Mentions having enjoyed young [ ]'s visit, and that he saw a couple more Cambridge [fellows] on Saturday - Northing and Barclay. Expresses wish to invite Synge sometime. The latter is to be married two weeks hence. Mentions having received 'an amusing letter' from Willmot. Swears that he did not say a word to Vaughan, or to anybody who could have mentioned it to him, about HS having 'shut him up so by [his] overpowering aspect of intellectual exaltation the day [they] met him'. Mentions the 'Bertrams', and the fact that he is 'doing the Philosophy of Induction', about which he is somewhat disappointed. Exhorts HS to buy and read Fremde's essay on The book of Job in 'Chapman's Library for the people'.

Letter from Sir H. W. Elphinstone to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that he went to Scotland with the intention of doing some fishing, but the weather has not been favourable for that activity, and he has gone to the Isle of Skye. Complains of the scarcity of meat. Describes the island as 'a wonderfully pretty place' but complains about the difficulty of traversing the mountains. Reports having climbed Sgùrr nan Guillean the previous day, and having found the cards of D[uncan?] Darroch, Trinity College, and --- Morgan, Jesus College, under a small [cairn], to which he added his own. Claims that Skye would be a good place for reading parties, and gives a description of its attractions. Uncertain as to whether he will be in town for [the Apostles'?] dinner, and expresses his displeasure with 'that Secretary [Charles?] Puller' for not having written to let him know when the dinner was to be. Writes patronisingly about 'these Highlanders' and their attempts to speak English, but claims there to be 'nothing like the jolly good Saxon civility', which, he maintains, recognises 'that true politeness does not ignore distinction of ranks.'

Elphinstone, Sir Howard Warburton (1830–1917) 3rd Baronet, barrister

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to the note that she wrote to him at the end of William's letter, and explains that she did not write since for fear of a letter not reaching him in Lucerne. Relates that she has been staying at Stone Gappe since, and has enjoyed her visit, despite the monotony of life and lack of amusement, and that 'all are so kind'. Describes the mountain air as refreshing, and claims that 'it seems to revive old feelings, and to bring vividly before one the days when life had never been a burden....' Claims to be grateful for the long holiday, but that much work remains to be done.

Fears that she has mislaid Henry's Exhibition Certificate, and undertakes to look for it when she goes home. States that her return home is delayed somewhat owing to her being unable to arrange her visits as she had wished. Believes that she will find solitude 'less irksome' than Henry imagines. Announces that she will go to Wellington College some time after her return home. Remarks that it seems a long time since she saw Minnie. Adds that she does not want either Minnie or Edward to feel that she 'should ever be the least restraint upon dear M.' States that she leaves Stone Gappe that day for Biddlesdon, where she shall be for about a fortnight, after which she intends to go to Leeds for ten days, and then home. Asks Henry to send her 'a Telegraphic message' if he is elected 'on the 29th', and wishes him success.

Remarks on Minnie going to Marlborough with Edward, who is to preach there, and on Mr Bradley having to entertain his company, 'Mrs. B. being upstairs!!' Reports that Arthur is at Wellington College, and will go to Marlborough with them. Adds that all send their love to Henry, and that Elizabeth [Cooper] is still there, but goes home on Monday.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at the news, which she heard from Henry's aunt Stephana, that he had been elected as a Fellow of Trinity, and appointed Assistant Tutor. Adds that she heard that his examination papers were the best, and states how proud of him she is. Declares that she is thankful also that Arthur enters on his new life with Henry by his side, and is glad of the good example he has set him.

States that she is on her way home, and shall be there on 22 or 24 October, and then goes to Wellington College. Thinks that Minnie would like to see her, and presumes that all Edward's friends will have had time to pay their visits. States that she hears on all sides of their happiness, and wants to see it for herself. Reports that Henry's aunt Henrietta is there [in Leeds], but that she goes to Bedford the following day to see his uncle and aunt [William and Stephana Crofts], and then proceeds to Brighton.

Encourages to bring any friend of him home for Christmas. Hopes that he will stay 'all the time at Rugby' as she will be very glad for all the family to be together once more. Reports that '[p]oor little Ellen' is very poorly with a fever. Asks him to give her love to Arthur and to tell him to write to her in Leeds until the end of the following week. Adds that Willy Croft's report for the [Doctor] is excellent. Asks to be remembered to all his friends, and that her congratulations be passed on to Mr Somerset. Does not think she knows Bowen. Wishes she had seen Father's name [on the list of elected fellows], and sends her particular remembrances to him and his brother.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Apologises for having neglected to write to him. Declares that her time at Wellington College has passed pleasantly, but has been devoid of incident. Refers to Minnie's happiness with Edward, and to her domestic activities. Remarks that Edward, although not ill now, needs rest. Looks forward to 'the happy Rugby Xmas', and declares that she is glad she kept on the house there. Is very glad that Henry will be at home all the vacation, and hopes that he will ask [A. J.] Patterson to come. Explains that during the latter half of the vacation Edward and Minnie and William will be gone, and suggests that he invites his friends then. States that she will ask William about his friends when she passes through Oxford the following Thursday, when she is to meet Lucy Brown and lunch with her in William's rooms.

Reports that Mr [Francis?] Martin has just been [at Wellington College], and told her that Henry is looking 'remarkably well'. Adds that she thinks that Henry should be doing lighter work. Tells him not to let Arthur work too hard. Reports that William was at Wellington College that previous Sunday, looking very well. Refers to 'the appointment [of H. M Butler as new headmaster] to Harrow', and remarks that '26 sounds very young', but that she hears that Butler 'is a very fit man.' Is glad to hear that Henry comes home on 15 [December]. Asks him to give the enclosed [not included] to Arthur.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Is very glad that Henry [and Arthur] are coming home [to Rugby] the following week 'to warm this cold empty house.' Reports that she is well, but that she hears that Minnie has a cold. Refers to imminent weddings: Mr Smythies. and Miss I. Anstey; Miss Atty and an Indian gentleman [i.e a British army officer who has served in India]; Miss [Sale] and 'a Mr. Smith'; and Miss Wratislaw. Urges to bring some copies of the photograph he mentioned, as she wants them for her self, and also for their 'old servant Hannah', who she hopes will come for Christmas. Asks if there is a photograph of Isaac [Barns]. Is pleased to hear of Arthur. Asks if he got Margaret's wedding cards from [Riddlesdon], and states that she 'really became "Mrs Cooper" on that day'. Saw Miss Attersoll at Wellington College; refers to her views on young headmasters. Adds that she hears that Mr Butler's appointment [as headmaster of Harrow] is very satisfactory. Refers to A. J. Patterson's impending visit. Asks Henry to thank Arthur for his letter, and to tell him 'to fix about his visit to Lee Warner' when he comes to Rugby. Also asks him to bring Arthur's certificate for the exhibition home.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Poem by George Otto Trevelyan, "A Pastoral for the 26th of December"

Poem addressed to A[rthur] Sidgwick, telling the tale of Sidgwick's indigestion on Boxing Day in mock-classical style, with allusions to Latin and Ancient Greek poetry pointed out in notes beside the main text. Alluding to Theocritus, "Idyll" 1.66, it asks where the Muses were when 'Rugby's fairest swain / Arthur lay writhing on the bed of pain'. Arthur's brother [Henry], Tom [Saunders?] Evans, [Charles Henry] Tawney and [Henry Weston] Eve are described as coming to his side, as is [Frederick] 'Temple himself', headmaster of Rugby. Sidgwick says that Trevelyan was wise to warn him, as they parted at Cambridge, about 'want of exercise, and Christmas fare'. Ends with a picture of the 'bard' sitting in Rotten Row, lighting a cheroot and smoothing his hat; he lays 'these poor lines' at the feet of Arthur, for whom his love 'grows every hour / Till it be broad as [Arthur?] Monck, and tall as [Henry?] Bower' [both contemporaries of Sidgwick and Trevelyan at Trinity].

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she has been 'on the move' since Henry's letter reached her. Reports that William joined her at Aylesford on Thursday 28 June, and then they went to Rugby, where they spent a day with Mr and Mrs Dakyns. They then went to Llangollen. Describes their journey by coach to Capel Curig. Reports that William almost reached the top of Snowdon. Intends to write to Henry's aunt at Wellington College to see if she could receive him, and suggests that if she cannot, that he might come to her in Wales. Informs him of her plans to return to Wellington College, and states that Elizabeth [Cooper?] will be there the following week.

States that she was sorry to find that Mr and Mrs [Charles and Susanna?] Arnold had left Rugby, and that she did not whom else he 'could ask about Heidelbergh'. Suggests that C[hristopher?] Benson might know whether it is damp or not. Asks Henry to send her a book that 'will take a good deal of reading', and yet which she can understand. Suggest the 'Dialogues of Plato'. Relates a story which she heard from Captain [Cheese] at Aylesford about Mrs [Mary?] Pollard Urq[uhart] - 'a connexion of the [Thomas Hill?] Greens - who reported hearing 'distinct footsteps near her without her seeing any one', and also hearing 'a shrill scream equally unaccountable'. Offers to send 'names + places' if he is interested. Asks him to send her some poetry also. Inquires as to whether he has heard from Arthur, and if Mr [J. B.?] Lightfoot is gone.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports on her guests - those from Skipton, Miss Attersoll and Mr Boyd. States that Miss Attersoll has been trying to infuse into her 'a clearer idea of the state of public affairs in Church and State.' Announces that Lucy Brown and Henry's Aunt Sidgwick are also to arrive. Asks him when she may expect him and Arthur, and whether it would be possible to go down to Brighton for a few days before coming home. Reports that his aunt [Henrietta?] has been ill, and that 'perhaps a familiar face [would] cheer her.' Hopes that Henry is well, and that he will not take as many pupils the following term. Declares that Lucy Brown 'thinks much of [Hawthorne's] Scarlet Letter.' Reports on a 'remarkable sermon' given by Dr Temple, and that Lee Warner says that he [Temple] is going to publish all he has preached [at Rugby]. Asks Henry to tell Arthur to write to her to tell her how he is, and hopes that he is not overworked. Refers to Graham Dakyns, who 'seems quite downhearted about his place', and asks if there is any cause for it. Reports that Elizabeth [Cooper?] 'was sadly knocked up at Xmas, 'and will suffer from it for long'.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Writes from Mrs Dakyns' house. Reports on the weather, and on the state of Elizabeth [Cooper?]'s health. Asks him why he doesn't send the photographs. Announces that she goes to Wellington College the following Monday, and wishes to have them before she goes. Undertakes to tell him 'by what [train? ]' they come to Cambridge.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from T. H. Green to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks him for his letter. Mentions Sidgwick's article, which Appleton failed to send him. Regrets not having convinced him about Locke. With regard to 'the chair', claims that he believes that the majority of the electors had made up their minds against him 'before the book came out, and they are not likely to be changed by it, while [Thomas?] Fowler, [his] chief supporter, may be alienated by it.' Claims that he has not been sleeping well for some time.

Green, Thomas Hill (1836-1882) philosopher

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Announces that she is back in Wellington College, having left William at Chester on his way to the Raikes [Robert Hodgson Sidgwick's house at Skipton]. States that he goes to Oxford, and then abroad, his final destination being Florence. Refers to the enclosed [letter; not included]. Reports that after leaving Beddgelert they went to Carnarvon, then to Bangor, and on to Llandudno. Adds that at Llandudno they met a group of relations - her brothers William and John, with their respective families, 'the M[ ]s - B[ ] - and Miss M[ ] and Miss [Wraith].' Reports that Minnie is very well. Announces that the [Grand] Speech day is on the following Tuesday. Remarks that Edward needs rest and a holiday. Adds that Elizabeth is there also. Also refers to Rugby. Asks him to tell her about spirit-rapping. Reports that she heard good news from Arthur, and that he is enjoying his sojourn immensely. Includes his address in Ambleside. States that '[t]hey are all charmed with Mr. Lightfoot', and describes his and Arthur's activities throughout the day. Asks Henry to tell her how he likes Berlin, and adds that there were no letters from Mrs [Susanna?] Arnold.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Rev. H. Brandreth to Henry Sidgwick

Entreats Sidgwick not to be persuaded by 'O.B.' [?Oscar Browning, representing Eton in the Apostles] or by anyone else that 'these lists represent the ordinary condition of the school.' Refers to mathematics, and a comparison with Rugby.

Brandreth, Henry (1834-1904) clergyman

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Minnie gave birth to 'a very nice plump little boy' that morning', and is well. States that Edward was away for the birth. Adds that Elizabeth claims that the baby is like William. Refers to Henry's letter, and states that they are all astonished at his 'cheap board and lodging with instruction', but expresses concern about 'those dreadful scourges' which afflict him by night. Is grateful for his description of 'the strange ceremony at Aix.' Hopes that he will find a companion to travel with. Announces that Edward 'is emancipated now and in a few days, all being well with Minnie and his babe'. Adds that he intends to go to Marlborough for a few days and the following week to join the party at Nab Cottage for a week. States that Mr Lightfoot has induced him to do so, and she is sure that it will do him good. Complains that the weather is very gloomy. Reports that Edward was not very well when his boys went away, and she does not think he has fully recovered yet. Remarks on Minnie's selflessness with regard to Edward. Reports that she has heard from William, and is now writing to him at Innsbruck, where she supposes he and Mr [Francis?] Otter will be in a week's time. Adds that he wrote from Munich, and had seen Henry's friends Cowell and Browning on their way to him. Sends Edward's and Minnie's love to him.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports again on the birth of a son to Minnie and Edward. Explains that the latter had gone to preach to Mr C[ ]'s at [Denbies] to preach at his church that day. Reports that Minnie is well, and that the baby is in good health. In relation to his name states that 'Martin', 'Edward White' and 'Arthur' have been suggested. Reports that the previous Saturday Edward went to spend some time with Mr Bradley at Marlborough, and then went to Tong, where he intended to spend the night with Emmeline [Woodhouse, his sister], and then on to Nab Cottage. Is of the opinion that Edward needed a break from Wellington College and all its attendant problems.

States that the following week Arthur, Trevelyan, Lee [Warner?], St[ ] and others accompany Mr Lightfoot and Edward to W[ast ]water 'en knapsack, weather permitting...' Adds that he must be home before 14 September when the College opens. Reports that Arthur has not been well, and has been suffering from his circulation. Announces that a trip to the Tyrol is not to go ahead, and that Trevelyan is going with him to Scarborough when their 'Lake Expedition' is over. Reports that she has not heard from William since she received a letter dated 16 August from Vienna, after which they were going to Innsbruck, and then on to Florence. Reports that she received a letter from Ada [Benson], who 'seems to be making progress'. She had been dining with Mr and Mrs Sergent, and the former's sister. Had hoped that Henry would come to Dresden.

Hears from Mrs S[ ] that a new master is soon to be appointed at Rugby. Relates that some days ago Edward received a letter 'from the author of [Other]Footsteps on the boundaries [of another world etc etc. - enclosing an account of the dreams connected with the Italian boy', which she believes Mr Eagles told them some years previously. States that 'Mr Owen has heard these dreams as connected with the family of a Mr. Benson - formerly a "Teacher at Rugby" and so writes to ascertain the truth'. Asks if Henry can help. Informs him that a bill came for him from Warwick's some days previously, and asks him what she should do about it. Reports that his uncle Christopher [Sidgwick?] was at Wellington College a fortnight previously, that the Raikes [party?: ie Robert Sidgwick and family] have been at Whitby, and also that the Riddlesden [home of John Sidgwick] ladies are going there.

Relates that Henry Longsdon and his family 'have been living for some weeks at a clerical hotel in London', and are travelling in Derbyshire, and that Fanny [Henry Sidgwick's cousin] goes home soon and will stay at Seacroft until Henry decides whether he will take the [ ] Secretaryship. Reports that William Lace [another cousin] and his family are at Stone Gappe, and that 'he is soon going to attend a social science meeting in Scotland'. States that her friends at Rugby keep looking for a house for her. Asks about Henry's progress with German.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Claims to have been anxious about his welfare, and that she had often thought about him the previous week, wondering which day he was crossing the channel. Reports that she left his aunt [Henrietta?] at Brighton the previous Friday when she came to Bedford through London, having spent a fortnight with her, and that the latter invites Henry to come to visit her. Reports that Minnie, Elizabeth and the baby are now gone to Brighton, out of the way, she presumes of measles which seems quite an epidemic in Wellington College. Hopes that Edward has not caught the infection. Hopes that Henry got their joint letter at Frankfurt and that he enjoyed his travels and his introduction to the [ ]. Asks after his and Arthur's health.

Intends to go and see Mr and Mrs C. Ward at Stapleton near Bristol when she leaves Bedford, and then paying a few visits before settling where her winter quarters are to be. Reports that his aunt says that she would be delighted if he and Arthur could come for a Sunday. Encloses the receipt of the bill paid at Warwick's [not included], and tells him that he can repay her when they meet. Reports that Aunt Lace is there, and that all join in sending their love to him.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she is at Saltford House near Bath to visit Julia[na] Kelly (née Boyd), formerly of Burfield Priory, who married after the Sidgwicks left Clifton. Announces that she is on her way to see Mr and Mrs C. Ward [perhaps the brother of Henry's aunt Mary Jane Sidgwick, and his wife] at Stapleton, and then is going on to Cheltenham to see Mr and Mrs Lace. Reports that she got both Henry's and Arthur's letters at Bedford, and that she found William at Oxford, suffering from a toothache. Adds that they discussed their winter gathering, and that William was agreeable to the proposal of staying at Sydenham. States that Henry's Aunt Croft's sister and her husband are about to take up their residence there. Asks for Henry's and Arthur's opinion. Mentions that Wellington College was proposed as a meeting place for all the family on Christmas Day, and states that she has written to Minnie to ask her about her plans.

Intends to go to Rugby to enquire about a house. Regrets that Henry could not see Minnie and her baby. Reports that Elizabeth 'still continues to take the place of nurse....' Thinks that Henry's uncle at Bedford [William Crofts] would be glad to see him, and suggests that Henry might give him 'some useful hints about his son William as to the books he ought to have....' Explains that the latter is in Mr Fanshawe's first class and has a good chance of an exhibition. Would like to hear about Henry's German experiences. Describes her time with her friend Julia as quiet, but adds that there is little to do. States that she meant to see Old King's Parade and 'and all the neighbours who still remain', and that she might get to see Miss Powell.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she has been 'a little out of sorts' since they arrived in Ambleside. Describes the position of Miss Clough's house, and the surrounding countryside. Reports that it is very wet that day, but that the previous day they were on the Lake for two hours. Thinks that Arthur looks 'comfortable well', and that William is better than she expected. Reports that Mr Wheatly Balme 'and his Bride' came to visit the previous day. Explains that the latter's brother is Vicar of Mirfield.

States that Arthur expected his friend Myers from P[ ] that morning, but that he had not appeared. Reports that they have newspapers and many books to keep them occupied. Describes a very hot day that she spent with Minnie and Bessie [Cooper?]. Refers to a conversation she had with Henry on D[ ]ham Down. Claims to have thought about his future life, and refers to the plan he mentioned at Brighton. Thinks of staying at Rugby for the present, where she 'could live comfortable whilst alone...' and states that his plans ought to take a more definite shape before she makes a move. Refers to a fire in London. Reports that Katie Lace is with her [in Ambleside], and sends her love to Henry.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from F.W. Temple to Edward White Benson.

Announces that Henry Sidgwick comes [to Rugby] as the new Master. Hopes that Benson and his wife [Sidgwick's sister] will be glad. Sends his and Sidgwick's love to her. Tells Benson to give his boy 'a toss'.

Temple, Frederick (1821-1902) Archbishop of Canterbury

Letter from E. M. Young to J. J. Cowell.

States that he does not forget that Cowell was to be at Lugano on 10 September, and announces that he will give 'no possible clue' as to his own whereabouts, beyond stating that he is 'still at this ancient seat of learning', but intends to go the following week to Llandudno, where his people are. Remarks that he has not seen 'the annual J.J.C in the Times yet'.

Reports that Trotter has returned, and that he and Sedley Taylor went up Mont Blanc. Enquired whether they had seen Cowell, and Trotter said that he 'hooted all the way from Grindelwald to Chamounix', and claimed that Cowell must have heard him, but 'wouldn't cry "cuckoo" '. Reports that he had 'an [angels] visit from Bowen the other day, which gave light and life to [their] proceedings. Refers to a four oared race with Huntingdon that Bowen organised, and to the fact that [George Henry?] Richards was 'stroke of the University.' Declares that 'Trevelyan is a splendid correspondent' and that he seems to be enjoying himself.

Reports that Henry Sidgwick and Brandreth have both been [to Cambridge] during the previous week. States that he 'never saw Sidg in such a state of embarrassment'. He had just accepted a Rugby mastership, but seemed to have forgotten about his composition lecture the following term. Adds that Clark was at Constantinople, and so Sidgwick 'could not get out of his difficulty except by telegraphing; he wrote subsequently to Temple to decline altogether, but was immensely disgusted at his "Vaughnism" - and on Monday morning packed his bag, and rushed to Paris, overwhelmed with shame and chagrin, to learn dancing.'

States that he has promised Eve to take his place at Wellington College during the fellowship week, and that when the fellowship exam is over Trevelyan, Wilson, and possibly Tawney are going to join Young in Wales. Reports that '[a] man called Thomas Harvey brother to the blacksmith who fires the guns, unfortunately smashed his mother[']s brains out, and two other people[']s heads in with a hammer the other day, at Fen Ditton, he got off and eluded the police for five days, by [clearly] hanging himself 50 ft high on a tree, not 200 yds from his mother[']s house.' Sends his love to Browning.

Young, Edward Mallet (1839-1900) Head Master of Sherborne School

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

States that his last letter was quite a relief to her, as his previous one had been somewhat painful to receive, and she had not heard from him since. Declares that she feels much happier about him now, and assures him that she shall hold sacred whatever he tells her on the subject. States that she is still at Hillary Place, in Leeds, and fears that she shall not be within his reach before Term begins, as she had arranged to return into C[raven], and then make her way to London and on to Wellington College, where she shall be staying for a little while in November. Intends to take lodgings somewhere for the winter.

Thinks it would be best for Henry to go on with his present work until something that he really prefers and for which he feels fit for presents itself. Admonishes Henry for his silence, and declares what a pleasure the receipt of a letter is to those 'who look forward to a solitary life after one of anxious tho' delightful work for others during the last 28 years.' Announces that she is off to A[rnaliffe] the following day, and shall be there for about ten days, and then goes on to Stone Gappe. [Incomplete]

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

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