Showing 272 results

Archival description
Philips, Anna Maria (1857-1946) philanthropist, daughter of Robert Needham Philips
Print preview View:

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. Lord's exeat. - Harrow were 'licked yesterday' [in the cricket match against Eton]. Spirits kept up by a 'very good lunch' with the Yates Thompsons; 'impossible to be depressed in the company of Dolly'. Went to the Royal Academy after the match, then went to see 'the Bastille taken' at Earl's Court; there were plenty of very pretty women, but he did not 'see any Turks'; he then took a 'water-toboggan' ride and went home. Wants to sends his pictures to Cambridge at the end of the term; asks what address at Trinity he should use; asks if Bob could put him up in Cambridge at the beginning of August to 'arrange business'; will go on 4 August to see Aunt Annie at Tunbridge Wells, and then to Wallington on Monday.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Apologises for not writing more often. Is very sorry that her aunt has been so unwell; hopes the anxious time has now passed; can quite understand how her uncle might 'develop infinite degrees of fussiness' under the strain and thus be 'the direct opposite of [Alphonse] Grandmont' as he is in many other ways. Hopes Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] also recovers quickly. His aunt Annie [Anna Maria Philips] is a 'dear creature', but always complains he does not write to or visit her enough; he also likes her 'invalid friend [Sophie Wicksteed]... to whom she has devoted herself'. His letter [about the landslide which damaged the Hotel Cappuccini at Amalfi] appeared in the "[Manchester] Guardian" on 2 January; it has pleased the locals as it says the coast is quite safe; thinks he will 'take to journalism', which is much easier than writing verse plays'. However, he has got on well this afternoon; is 'making no end of the wife, who is no end of a heroine'; teases Bessie by saying she will not get the chance to be such a faithful wife, as he will keep a closer eye on her. Copies out 'an old fellow who wrote about you in the 17th century' [Richard Crashaw, "Wishes to his (Supposed) Mistress"].

Continues the letter next morning; has breakfasted and 'pumped [his] ideas on Latin poetry into bucket Straughn Davidson [James Leigh Strachan-Davidson?] for half an hour'. Finishes copying out the Crashaw poem; thinks it influenced Browning. Glad Bessie has heard some music. Is 'very fond of Rameau', and has 'often heard Dolmetsch play him'. They must find out where Gluck is being played and go there; he 'can't wait much longer without hearing the Iphigenia and the other great ones'; though she might think him a Wagnerian. Hopes she will hear Lamond again. Finishes the letter in early afternoon. It is cold and stormy, and he will go to 'a nook under the cliff' to work. Discusses the rumours that there are letters incriminating [Joseph] Chamberlain [in the Jameson Raid?]; the 'Parnell letters and the Henry forgeries [in the Dreyfus case]' are warnings to be careful about such things, though if genuine they should be published; if this leads to a 'basis for peace so much the better'. Hopes Bessie's housekeeping is not tiring her; he will not be 'exacting' when they are married, 'especially with Mrs Enticknap to do everything' for her

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will be glad to welcome Elizabeth and Robert on 13 August; they will see Aunt Annie [Philips], who comes on the 9th. Glad they will be there for the 'festivities'; there will be the Exhibition, the servants' party, and a garden party for the neighbours to introduce Mary, who must 'make dignified little bows, and not jump onto the arms of chairs!'; she is 'great fun', and Elizabeth will like her when she knows her. Interested to hear of Miss [Laetitia] Ede, who is sure to get on since she has 'real energy'. Sir George knows nothing about Gregorian chants; he liked the 'florid music at the Oratory' and is sorry it has stopped. Asks if she should find someone to accompany Elizabeth on her visit; Mr [Charles?] Orde of Nunnykirk gave Caroline a name, which she encloses; it will be a problem what to do with her in the evening 'if she is not a lady' so she may ask her to come for the day to see what she is like. Cannot put Elizabeth up at Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] on the 4th, as Maria [Springett] is taking her holiday and has put everything away; hopes it will not be inconvenient to go to a club or a hotel; believes the Great Northern Hotel is comfortable and would be convenient [this section of the letter crossed out] but Elizabeth is travelling by Euston. Hopes the weather is drier by Monday, when a group of hospital nurses are coming. Asks whether Mrs Salmonson [sic: Jeanne Salomonson Asser] will return to Holland when Elizabeth leaves Rottingdean.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will write to Jan Hubrecht at once and invite him; sorry M. [Ambrosius?] and Mad. H[ubrecht] are staying for such a short time. Has had interesting letters from Robert about the Chantrey Com[mission]n, [Roger] Fry and so on; he will be glad when Elizabeth comes. C[harles] and M[ary] hope to get into their new house on 8 August; G[eorge] and J[anet] are going to see Aunt Annie [Philips] tomorrow. If Elizabeth thinks Mary can play well enough to accompany her, they can 'make her practice'; it is very kind of Elizabeth to say she will play at a party. Caroline has to organise the Tenant's party. Asks if Elizabeth's subscription to the G[rosvenor] Cr[escent] Club is due; Caroline will give her the money when they meet; believes the Club has changed management.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Will send back some of Robert's books: the Chaucer; Conrad's "Lord Jim", which Sir George has read before; and Belloc's book, which Caroline 'can manage better' than Sir George. Arthur Sidgwick, who is 'very well and cheerful', and his wife are here; there has been much toboganning down the hills behind the house by 'all the very large pleasure society of Stratford', though now snow and Stratfordians are gone. Delighted to have news of Elizabeth and the baby [Paul]; Aunt Annie [Philips] is very pleased at the news; she is at Palermo and has been to Segesta, which was a hard journey of eleven hours.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Begins the letter 'Dear as a daughter', which she says was used by 'an old Medici lady' in the book Robert has lent her ["Lives of the early Medici as told in their correspondence", by Janet Ross], which she finds interesting but has not yet finished. Annie [Philips] is here and seems well. Is more or less recovered from her 'little feverish attack'. Glad to have good news of Julian. Asks if Elizabeth can send back 'the Shetland scarf' if she is not using it, as it 'does not look as "invalidy" as a shawl'; glad she is better. The 'A.S's' [Arthur and Charlotte Sidgwick], Janet and George 'amalgamated well'. Asks if Elizabeth's maids have recovered, and hopes the nurse [Mrs Catt] is sleeping better. Miss Richardson is here and is going with TitBits [the horse] 'to see sights accompanied by Annie's maid'. Sir George was very pleased to get Robert's letter; he has had a correspondence 'with "the master" [of Trinity, Cambridge, Montagu Butler?] on classical things'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

'On the Road! Birmingham [written on 8, Grosvenor Crescent notepaper]. - Glad Elizabeth had a good time at Pen Moel; has met the 'rather astonishing lady [Agnes Macdonald: see 46/101]' and does not know what Meggy [Price] sees in her. Everything lovely at Welcombe and she was sorry to leave, but Sir George is 'longing to be at work again'. Now on her way to the Park [home of Annie Philips]; hopes to be at Wallington by Saturday evening. Glad that Elizabeth has seen the V[aughan] W[illiams]s and that 'all is going pleasantly'; hopes the roof [of the new house] will be on before she and Robert go abroad. Caroline and Sir George dined at the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club and thought it 'very much gone off'; the food and the meeting [?] were both bad. Thinks she will give it up next year; for the cost of the subscription she could have a kitchen maid. Writing at Birmingham station, having seen Sir George off North. He is 'enormously excited about the Russian business' [the Dogger Bank incident]; since he is 'so peaceful generally', his agitation makes her worried about 'what hot headed jingos will do'. If Elizabeth would like to stay at Tunbridge Wells for the Conference, the local secretary Miss Jones is Caroline's friend and would take her in or find her somewhere else to stay; Sophie [Wicksteed] seems very ill; does not think Aunt A[nnie] would like any visitors there in her absence.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad the invalid [Thomas Sturge Moore] has recovered, and that Mrs Moore is such a good friend; hopes he is not 'delicate'. Sir George has sent a hare and duck which he shot himself. Caroline sends part of a letter from Miss Jones and some newspaper reports; asks Elizabeth to destroy Miss Jones's note and return the reports to her at 37 Broadwater Down, Tunbridge Wells. Glad Elizabeth enjoyed the Conference [of the Women's Liberal Associations?]; Mrs [Eva?] McClaren is 'bold' and 'uncompromising', but also 'warmhearted... cultivated' and charming. Knows Mrs [Frances] H[eron] Maxwell from the Westminster Women's Liberal Association; her 'appearance is really terrible' but she is a 'very good woman', most energetic, and 'sympathetic with working women'. Mary wrote a paper on land value and read it at the [Women's Liberal Associations] Conference at Sunderland; Caroline is very pleased they are both interested in the work she likes so much. Sure Maria [Springett] will enjoy making Elizabeth comfortable; Aunt Annie will be at Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] on Friday afternoon. Sir George has been asking how the [building of the new] house is going; perhaps Robert can write about it. Asks when they are going abroad, and whether Elizabeth has found anyone to go with her. Will send flowers on Monday. Hopes Robert's proofs are going well[ for "The Birth of Parsival?]. George's book ["England Under the Stuarts]" is just coming out.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Originally enclosing a letter to Ursula, marked 'urgent'; was going to forward it to the Darwins but changed his mind; Bessie is not coming home till the evening, and he thought he should send it at once. Has been home for a few days after going to Wallington, the [Gordon] Bottomleys and Aunt Annie [Philips]. Tom [Sturge Moore] is back here, but Marie is in London for the time being. Glad Julian will be able to come during his leave. Went to the Sickert show at the National Gallery; there were 'crowds of pictures, some very good' but in general the show at Agnews a few years ago was 'more select' and gave a better idea of him.

Letter from Anna Maria Philips to R. C. Trevelyan

The Park, Prestwich, Manchester. - Thinks Bob should see the enclosed letters from Miss [Meta] Gaskell [19/22] and Mr Broadfield [no longer present] which she received last week. Has bought six copies of his play ["Bride of Dionysus"] which she is sending to friends whom she thinks will admire it; expects he has had 'endless letters of congratulations' from his 'many friends'. Sends love to Elizabeth; expects she is still at Hove and hopes the sea air does her and Julian good after the 'trying' winter. Would very much to see them all later if they can visit.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Went to Halifax on Monday, returning yesterday morning; their meetings went well and she 'gave a party to about 15,000 people!'. Wonder if Elizabeth's sister [Mien Röntgen] has left, and whether she has been up for the [Joachim?] concerts. Is expecting Annie [Philips] for a brief call, on her way to Tunbridge Wells.; hopes to take her for a drive. Asks how 'Tweenie' is doing.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

He and Bessie have read Julian's diary and 'thought it extraordinarily good'; very sorry it 'can hardly be published, at least not now'. Bessie and Miss Simpkins have just gone off to Aunt Annie [Philips]'s. Bessie thinks he should ask Julian to send back "Tono-Bungay" [by H.G. Wells], the "East Wind" and [?] "Soha", but he does not actually want them at the moment so Julian should only send them when he is quite finished with them; however, asks him to send the bicycle clips if he can. Very good to see him and Ursula; afraid it will be a long time before they see them again. Just off to London to spend an evening with Desmond [MacCarthy] at Hampton.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad that Elizabeth has got home safely and that Julian is happy. Encloses a cheque from Sir George to settle their account [for the stay at Eastbourne]. Annie [Philips] and Robin [Price] have been here this afternoon; they came to the crematorium at Golders Green [for the cremation of her sister Margaret Price] and have just left for Pen Moel. Annie says it is 'dreadful to have 2 days!' and has promised not to go to Tibberton for the funeral tomorrow. Good of Charles and George to go this morning, as well as Morton [Philips], two of the Gregs, Annie Thompson and Betty Bostock [?]. Sir George is well, and she feels better; they had a 'quiet walk in Kensington Gardens' yesterday and today, and she has started taking a tonic. Looks forward to seeing Elizabeth on Friday.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to have news of Paul; the photograph of him touching Theodore's foot is 'delicious'. The new MP for Hexham, [Richard Durning] Holt and his wife, are staying at Wallington, as are: Aunt Annie [Philips]; Josephine Lawson; the younger Hugh Bell, in whom Sir George has 'discovered a great likeness to [Edward] Bowen' and thinks it 'extends to character'; and Sir Francis Blake. He and Caroline are 'much interested about [Laurence] Binyon'; wonders if [Sidney?] Colvin thinks he is 'breaching on Stephen Phillips's domain'. Glad Robert liked what he saw of [Macaulay's] "Marginal Notes", which Sir George has now typed up; Longmans are going to publish it.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Saw Simon Nicholson [ie Reginald Popham Nicholson] yesterday; cannot remember whether Julian knows him; he and his wife live near [E.M.] Forster and are 'great friends of his and B.B. [Bernard Berenson] and now of Bob and Bessie. Has given Bob the address of a friend whom Julian might like to meet, a 'camouflage during the last war' and also a painter, 'about 60 years old, and very intelligent etc'; however, he is based 'up beyond Fort William, nearer the [Loch Ness] Monster than to [Julian]'. Bessie is home from the Park [home of Annie Philips], and seems well; they hope to see Ursula soon. Simon Nicholson was in the colonial service with Lugard in west Africa 'for years'; said he was shown some of Julian's 'Africa sketches by K[enneth?] Clark and liked them very much'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Thinks this [referring to an enclosure now not present?] is a 'really dear old letter'; he is 'human enough to prefer such 'thinking aloud' to 'propriety' though he would not have written it himself and hopes he will 'be spared a correspondence'. Very pleased that Elizabeth so likes his book ["Garibaldi and the Thousand"]; values her opinion 'highly'. She is 'quite right about the Sicilians'; if it were not for his considerable debt to 'individual Sicilians', he would have been 'more humorous at the expense of their absurd countrymen'. Comments on what a 'jolly time we have on the Fifth of November'. Is lunching with 'the Jans' [Jan Hubrecht and his wife] tomorrow at Cambridge. Notes in a postscript that he knows about Aunt Annie [Philips] and has heard from her.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Headed 'Private'. Encloses a letter from Aunt Annie [Philips: 13/229]. Suggests that if Bob does decide to write to their father as she suggests, he should begin by saying that he does not know whether their mother is 'really likely to leave us quite soon', but understands from Aunt Annie that this is a possibility, and that he is anxious that in that event their father should not hurry to leave Welcombe. Also thinks that Bob should say he and Bessie have 'no thought of moving into Welcombe' themselves.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - News of Julian, who is well and does not seem to be too much disturbed by teething. He is always very excited when he sees Hearn [the butler] and 'insists on his lifting him up to look at the pictures'. Took him for a drive to the village yesterday, and now he has gone for his 'last poney [sic] cart drive'. Elizabeth's dinner on Monday will be very amusing; hopes she will not get tired out with her busy fortnight. Annie [Philips] is coming from Monday till Thursday; expects she will be in an 'over-energetic mood'; she must have helped the two young men [her Price nephews] very much as they have been making inventories. Has had no more letters from George, but C[harles] says he is quieter [after the death of his son Theodore]. Sends love and a "Times Literary Supplement" for Bob.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wengen. - Delighted to imagine Julian walking; hopes Elizabeth will be less troubled when the new nurse is settled and 'poor Mrs Catt gone'. They have good weather again, and there are beautiful views. The railway 'goes up over the Heidegg [sic: Scheidegg pass?]; they went up there yesterday and looked into the Lauterbrunnen valley. She is feeling much better. Sir George is 'so intensely & simply delighted with his order [the Order of Merit]'; he has had an 'avalanche of letters' which he loves replying to. They plan to get to London on 5 July; Sir George will receive the Order from the King on the 6th, then go up to Wallington; Caroline will go to Annie at the Park till the 10th; asks if she and Elizabeth can meet in London. Must wait till Wallington to see Julian. Asks if there is a photograph of him walking. C[harles] and M[ary] seem to have much enjoyed themselves [at the Coronation?], and the 'children's visit was a success'. Preparations for summer visitors in Switzerland are 'on a gigantic scale', though it is still quite quiet. They begun their journey home tomorrow.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Will be very pleased if Elizabeth brings Julian for a visit. Is going to see Annie from 21- 24 July, though unluckily Charles can come for that weekend so she will miss him; Mary is staying on with the children to look after Sir George; when they leave Julian can have the nursery to himself; can arrange the time for Elizabeth's second visit later, when they hope to see Robert too. Thinks Elizabeth is lucky to get Nurse Withers: it is rare to get two good nurses in succession. [Charles and Mary's] children are well and have 'a very satisfactory governess'. Asks how much help Elizabeth's nurse will need; would need to get extra help to provide the waiting on which Mrs Catt had. The Davidsons only have one young man lodging with them besides Gussie at the moment, so Mrs Enticknap could stay there; Caroline would pay.

Card from Anna Maria Philips to R. C. Trevelyan

The Park, Prestwich, Manchester. - Thinks Robert may like to see this letter [19/13] from Mrs Herbert Philips about his poems ["The Bride of Dionysus"], of which Anna Maria sent her a copy last week. Professor Herford also lunched with her last week, took a copy of the book and read it on the lawn; he 'came in for tea highly pleased... and enthusiastic'. If only Robert could come during term time [at the Victoria University of Manchester]; knows he would enjoy meeting him.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Park, Prestwich, Manchester. - Very sorry to hear that Elizabeth and Julian are not coming north, but it is better for him to get well again. Passed on the message to Annie [Philips] who would like to put Elizabeth up. Suggests she comes at the end of August to spend a week before G[eorge] and J[anet] come and a week with them. Mrs Enticknap should write to Mrs Davidson and arrange with her when she is coming [to visit Gussie]. Is glad Sir George will be getting 'a difficult puzzle'; he finishes the easy ones far too quickly. There is 'an outbreak of garden parties at Wallington', but will still have one when the family are all with her. Annie is very well.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Delighted that Elizabeth is 'enjoying the Booths' company'; very sorry that C[harles] Booth is so unwell, as heart problems are hard to deal with. She and Sir George agree with what she says about him: it is 'extraordinary' that he has such a 'knowledge of the working class' and yet 'his conclusions are so vague & formless, & so absolutely unsuited to practical politics'. Thinks something must happen soon at Cheyne Gardens; Janet [due to give birth] is well, but when Caroline took her on a drive yesterday she 'seemed less comfortable'. Charles and Mary are well and come to dine tonight. Politics very interesting: the Government have 'got into another disgraceful mess about Ireland' but obviously 'intend to stay in as long as possible'. She and Sir George went to a Court last night; she had a new grey dress, and Pantlin 'made up [her] last years train with grey chiffon'; they saw many friends and left early. Went to Broadwoods about pianos; they say they pay little for grand pianos since 'no one buys them now', so she thinks they must put up with the size of the piano in London and buy a small upright for Welcombe, in light oak to suit the room; Elizabeth can choose it. Asks if she will return to England much before Easter. Mr Gow [Thomas Gow, a Northumberland neighbour?] is very ill and may die; he is eighty-seven. Has written to Robert about his book ["The Birth of Parsival"?]. Janet likes it and quoted a passage she found beautiful. Annie [Philiips] is coming up this afternoon. Good that Elizabeth and Robert's new house is nearly finished; it has been a 'wonderful winter for building'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne. - Thanks Bob for the letters: the 'only new fact' is that their father 'behaved worse than [George] knew under pressure from Uncle Mark [Philips]"; will go through his narrative ["Sir George Otto Trevelyan: A Memoir"] and make any changes necessary; will of course not go into details; Aunt Annie [Philips] has approved what he has written so far. Much looking forward to his visit to the Shiffolds. Remembers in a postscript how their father would sit at Welcombe 'saying cheerfully "We shall all end in the workhouse" - and never thought it less'; the 'workhouse seems a bit nearer today' but they must hope.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Robin Ghyll, Langdale, Ambleside. - Was very sorry to miss Bessie at Cambo; hopes her 'lumbago is better at last'. Janet has been in bed with a sore throat, but is now better. Glad Bessie saw Mary again at the Park [Anna Philips' house]; she is 'most eagerly looking forward to Holland'. Will see [Pieter] Geyl as soon as he returns to the south, and draft a preface [to Bessie's translation of Fruin's "The Siege and Relief of Leyden in 1574"] to discuss with her; thinks that Fruin's preface might be dispensed with, especially if he 'quote[s] a few sentences'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth is not over-burdened with 'guests & small worries', and that she might be able to do some good for her cousin [one of the Hubrechts?] and his wife; always difficult, but 'the mere fact of his relations being kind to her' may help; it is all very sad and unfortunate for their child. Is glad Julian 'flourishes'; expects it will be good for him to be in the nursery with the other children [Mary and Humphry], who will be there throughout Elizabeth's visit. G[eorge] and J[anet] will come for a week, and Aunt Annie [Philips] will also be visiting then. Hopes to hear about Robert's plans for travel abroad in the winter. Hopes the game arrived; will send some grapes on Monday. Thoughts on the strikes: sympathises with the men, and there is 'something fine in them acting together', but the violence has been very unfortunate, and the economic impact great. Churchill 'seems to have made mistakes' but it was hard 'in such a storm' to see clearly; Sir George thinks he was 'not strong enough at first'. Amusing that the House of Lords has been so entirely forgotten. The [tenants'] party was on Thursday, and went well except for a little rain; Sir George and Charles made speeches, and Geordie said afterwards 'That was nice poetry'. He, Pauline and Kitty gave their grandparents a concert the other day; their governess is 'clever at getting up little entertainments' and they sing 'very prettily' now. Audrey Trevelyan has been to visit, and they like her a lot. Sends love to Bob; hopes Mr [Donald] Tovey will have done much work on the opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"] before he goes.

Results 1 to 30 of 272