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Turing, Henry (1843-1922) consul
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Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall. - Likes the sketch of Bessie's wedding costume; quite Watteau-esque as she says. He is 'no judge of silks' but the piece she sends looks good; encloses samples of cloth for his trousers and for a tweed suit and asks her opinion. Will probably stay in Cornwall till next Wednesday; [George] Moore and MacCarthy are the only others there at the moment; [G.H.?] Hardy left yesterday, and he hopes both 'Llewelyn Davieses' [Crompton and Theodore?] are coming tomorrow. Describes the place; Moore 'played a lot and sang yesterday after tea', then they played cards and talked. Is reading James's "Daisy Miller", which is 'charming'. Discussion of the music box; has written to his mother to suggest having the partitions taken out; it is from both George and Charles. Expects it would be best to invite the consul [Henry Turing, at Rotterdam, to the wedding celebration]; he may not come. Did not mean that Sir Henry [Howard] would arrange all the legal marriage business, but he offered to arrange the ceremony and invitation of the consul; expects he could do this most easily but it would not matter if they or her uncle should arrange it. Will write to Sir Henry or Turing when he hears from her uncle, though is not sure what to say. Would prefer to invite Sir Henry to the wedding, especially as Bob's father and mother are coming, feels he should ask his parents what they think. Sir Henry is a relation, and has 'shown great good-will and readiness'.

Does not see why Bessie should cut herself off completely from her Dutch musical friends; she will 'often be in Holland', and will 'surely stay at Mein's [sic: Mien Rontgen's] in Amsterdam'; in England, she will of course have 'complete freedom to make her own friends' and must keep up and develop her own talents as much as she can; he will enjoy hearing her play, but also going to hear others and getting to know her friends, but that does not mean she should not have independence of interests and friendships. Thinks that women 'have not enough respect for their own intellectual lives' and give it up too easily on marriage, through their husband's fault or their own; she should 'quite seriously consider going to settle in Berlin for 5 or 6 months' for her music. Mrs [Helen] Fry's marriage has made her more of a painter. Her pleurisy is better now; thinks Bessie exaggerates the importance of her cigarette smoking, and that any ill effects it does have are balanced by the help it gives her to create art. Has never 'been in danger of being in love' with Helen Fry, but always found her 'more interesting and amusing than any woman [he] ever met... with a completely original personality', and would not think of criticising such a person's habits but would assume they are 'best suited to their temperament'; in the same way, Moore probably 'drinks more whisky than is good for his health, and smokes too much too', but he would not criticise him. Bessie is also 'an original person' with a 'personal genius of [her] own', but in addition he loves her; has never felt the same about any other woman.

Continues the letter next day. Has finished "Daisy Miller"; and is doing some German, getting on better than he thought he would. Part of the reason for saying he would 'never learn German' was an 'exaggerated idea of the difficulty', but more because he thought, and still thinks, it will be less of a 'literary education' than other languages; is chiefly learning it for Goethe, though being able to read German scholarship will be useful. Has read Coleridge's translation of "Wallenstein", which Schiller himself claimed was as good as the original; thinks English and [Ancient] Greek lyric poetry is better than the German he has read. Very sorry about Lula [Julius Röntgen]; asks if it [his illness] will do more than postpone him going to Berlin. Has heard from Daniel that Sanger is 'getting on quite well'; hopes he will return from Greece 'quite himself again'. Will be nice for Bessie to see the Joneses [Herbert and Alice] again; he has 'become a little parsonic perhaps' but very nice; has seen little of him for the last few years. Bessie should certainly get [Stevenson's] "Suicide Club" for Jan [Hubrecht]; will pay half towards it. Will certainly come before Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] returns. Has grown 'such a beard, finer than Moore's and McCarthy's, though they have grown their's for weeks'. Describes their daily routine. Is encouraged that Moore likes several recent poems he himself was doubtful about; is copying out the play and will show him today or tomorrow. The Davieses are coming this afternoon. Signs off with a doggerel verse.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has to go to meet [Desmond] MacCarthy soon and may not finish letter in time for the post; hope matters [regarding the wedding] have cleared up. Glad it is settled about Turing; expect her uncle will arrange about the banns and talk to the Burgermaster [sic]. Saw the Frys today; is going with them to Roundhurst next Monday, to stay a night at the farm where he would like to spend the first days of their honeymoon; the nightingales will be 'wonderful', there are none in the North, and 'a honeymoon without nightingales would never do'. Fry thinks he should not miss the [Apostles'] dinner but they can discuss this. Some of his friends have 'combined' to give them the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry, which Bessie has seen; he likes it very much as a work of art; also as an instrument, though not perhaps as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch; thinks it a 'splendid present'. [Bernard] Berenson is the 'chief contributor'; will send her the list of the contributors, about twenty of them, soon.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Last day at Dorking before he goes to Cornwall; is working well, and encloses a poem he wrote yesterday; it perhaps does not express what he feels about love, but is pretty; Sappho used the comparison of a rose to Venus's elbow first. Glad her cold has gone. Is going to Cornwall on Wednesday, and will probably stay a week; will write and probably do some German. Copies out the Heine poem [comparing the poet to Laocoon and his love to a snake], "Lyrical Intermezzo "13; likes the one she sends; quotes from Heine to promise that she will live happily. Has just finished [Victor Hugo's] "Hernani"; remembers she once indicated she did not like it; sets out his own response; prefers Euripides' "Medea" which he has also been reading and will help him with his own play. Agrees that the consul, Henry Turing, should not be invited to the wedding breakfast; better to invite [Abraham?] Bredius or someone else they all know. Is ready to write to Turing, but thinks it would be simplest if Sir Henry Howard did, as he offered; not important though if her uncle thinks otherwise. Must write to Sir Henry; as he told her uncle, thought it 'a little discourteous' to Sir Henry not to let him arrange everything as he offered. Tells he not to worry about these details. Agrees to the 7th [June] as the date; will tell his parents and is sure they will agree too. Asks if he saw her lace in London; not sure what 'Watteau pleats' are but likes the idea of them.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Returned last night and found her letter with the patterns. [Desmond] MacCarthy is here, as they went to see Sudermann's "Magda" ["Heimat"]; they are now going out to 'buy straw hats and see pictures and Sturges [Moore]'. Goes back [to Westcott] tomorrow. Had a good time at the Lizard; [George] Moore liked his play better than expected, though thinks its subject is 'not very congenial' to Bob and he does better with 'lighter and more comedy subjects'; Bob thinks he agrees, but will try to finish this one.

Continues the letter next day after returning to Westcott. He and MacCarthy went with a literary friend of Bob's called Horne to a music hall to see Dan Leno, 'a quite Shakespearian genius' whom Bessie must see one day. Will write to [Henry] Turing tomorrow and send it through Sir Henry [Howard]. Ready to admit her uncle is right and also does not want Sir Henry to be at the wedding; thinks his parents will understand if he talks to them. The Gr[andmonts]'s feelings 'make it necessary Sir H. should not be there', though he does not think they should carry them to such lengths. Encloses two new trouser patterns with the one she chose before. Hopes she enjoys her visits and concert, and sees something of J[oachim].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has had many letters to write this morning: to Sir Henry and Mr Turing; to Mrs Pepper at Seatoller to reserve rooms and ask if they will have the house to themselves; to Mr Insley to ask when he will collect his furniture; then to Irene Zocco who has just sent back the books he lent her. Teasingly wonders whether he should ask permission before writing to 'young foreign ladies'; will continue writing, and sending books 'as she is very few, and is too poor to get them, and yet is genuinely fond of reading'; he and Bessie must see them when they are next in Sicily. Finally wrote to his mother to thank her for the things she is sending; hopes the sofa will be comfortable. Very glad Bessie is meeting Joachim again. Does not at all think it will be necessary to invite the Howards [to the wedding]; would just like to speak to his mother first; takes the point that the invitations are sent by her uncle and aunt. Agrees that it would be good to be married totally privately, but she must not worry herself. Did not write any poetry yesterday, but had a 'fine time on the moor'. Agrees that she was 'a bold girl to ask [him] to come over and vondle' her.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has received the conditions of marriage from Bessie's uncle, which seem all right and which he will discuss with his father at the end of the week. Is not sure about coming over early in April [sic: May], as her uncle seems to expect; in his 'last month of freedom' he would like to have a few friends such as Phelps, Sickert, and MacCarthy to stay, and to go with the Frys to Roundhurst to see the bluebells. Also wants to get more work done. Appreciates that these reasons 'look a bit selfish', and that her uncle and aunt want to see them together; there will also be business to complete. Will certainly be there for her birthday, and if Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is coming on the 17th or 18th would come a few days before that. Bessie must say if she does not think this early enough. Asks whether the catalogue for the beds is at Grosvenor Crescent; asks what else must be bought, and whether the pillows will fit their pillow cases. Has written to Thuring [sic: Henry Turing] and Sir Henry [Howard]. Asks about the tie and footwear he should wear for the wedding; has a pair he wore for Roger [Fry]'s wedding he thinks are all right. The Frys are away for a holiday; when they return soon he will settle on colours for the bedroom and send them. Asks if she has thought about their return crossing. His mother does not think his father will want to see him for a few days.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is sure things will improve and she must not worry; as his mother says, 'it is really rather... a storm in a teacup'; it is nothing to compare to the happiness that will soon be theirs. Though he often fails 'through weakness and idleness', his life 'has been passionately devoted... to the best and most beautiful things which [his] imagination can attain to' and hers will be as well; lists all that will be good in their lives. Will write again to the consul [Henry Turing] if he does not hear from him today, since they need to know whether he can come on the 7th [June]; has also not heard from Sir Henry Howard, through whom he sent the letter; will send the second letter direct to Turing. There has been some delay at the lawyers about the settlements; has written to tell them to speed up. Bessie should tell him if he need do anything else regarding the marriage conditions her uncle sent. Thinks he may come over on 12 or 13 June. Meta Smith, his aunt Margaret's daughter, has sent a silver inkstand, and Mrs Holman Hunt a piece of Japanese silk. Had a good time at Cambridge: saw Mrs McTaggart, a 'nice quiet sort of person'; Tom Moore read his play and thinks it should come out well though he has pointed out 'some serious faults and suggested alterations'; Moore is going to give him a lot of his woodcuts, and has begun an Epithalamium for them, though since he has not got on with it says they should defer the wedding for a month. Asks what he should do about the Apostles' dinner; it will be 'quite exceptional this year', Harcourt is president and everyone will come; would very much like to go but will not break their honeymoon if she does not wish it. Very keen to go to the lakes eventually, but they could spend a few days before the dinner at Blackdown among his 'old haunts'; Mrs Enticknap's aunt lives in a farmhouse a mile from Roundhurst, which would be perfect. Hopes [Alice and Herbert] Jones' visit has been a success. [Desmond] MacCarthy is coming tomorrow for a few days and [Oswald?] Sickert on Sunday for the day. Will see [the Frys] this evening and discuss colours for the walls. Thinks [Charles] Sanger is very happy; is not entirely sure [about the marriage], since 'Dora has behaved so strangely', but everything seems to be coming right. Has ben reading Emerson on poetry and imagination and thinks it 'amazingly fine and right'. Most people think "Pères et enfants [Fathers and Sons]" is Turgenev's best book; he himself does not like the ending but finds the book charming; has heard the French translation, the only one he has read, is better than the German or English one - Sickert says so and he is half-German. Has ordered the trousers, and found the catalogue so will order the beds and so on next week. Glad Bessie got on with her socialist sister [Theodora]. has just had a note from Sir Henry Howard saying 7 June will suit Turing; she should let her uncle know. Does not think there will be further delay with the legal papers.

Marriage certificate of R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven issued by the British Consulate, Rotterdam

Certifies that R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven were married at the Town Hall of the Hague by P. O. H. Gevaerts van Simonshaven before Henry Turing, British consul at Rotterdam, witnessed by Charles Trevelyan and Sir George Otto Trevelyan. Copy extract from Dutch marriage certificate [23/16]. Signature of Henry Turing certifying that this is a true copy of the entry in the marriage register, and stamps of the British consulate.

Letter from Sir Henry Howard to R. C. Trevelyan

British Legation, The Hague. - Has seen Henry Turing, the British consul at Rotterdam, who confirms that the information Sir Henry gave Robert regarding his forthcoming marriage is correct: since his fiancé is a Dutch citizen, the marriage must be solemnized at the town hall in the Hague, and Turing must be present as consul so that the marriage can be properly registered in England. Turing has promised to come to the Hague; Robert is to pay for his expenses and consular fees. Mr [Paul] Hubrecht will be able to advise on the Dutch formalities. Sends regards to Elizabeth van der Hoeven and Robert's family.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sorry to hear from Bessie this morning that her aunt was unwell; hopes she has now recovered. Bessie seems well, and they have had a good time at Welcombe; they go tomorrow to Dorking and on Monday to Dorking. She and his parents and brothers are now 'great friends'. Encloses a letter [13/36] from Sir Henry Howard [British ambassador to the Netherlands] saying that [Henry] Turing [British consul at Rotterdam] will come to the Hague for the wedding. Has spoken to his father, who will consult an English lawyer, on the points discussed with Hubrecht. Will see an oculist when he is in London on Monday; the spectacles can be sent if they are not ready when Bessie leaves; will also pay Luzac's bill. Asks to be remembered to Hubrecht's wife and Louisa; his parents send their regards.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Glad to hear Hubrecht's wife has been outside and hopes to find her 'really better' when he comes over in May. Bessie has told him Hubrecht does not object to Whitweek for the wedding; this will be best for Robert's parents and brothers who all intend to come; doubts if anyone else from England will come; Hubrecht and Bessie should decide on the exact date. This will depend on when the Rotterdam consul [Henry Turing] can come; asks whether it would be best for him or Hubrecht to write about that, or should he ask Sir Henry Howard to do so? Bessie says they will probably need another witness; remembers Hubrecht said that if the consul were Dutch he might do, or he would have no objection to [Abraham] Bredius or any other friend of Hubrecht. If it is necessary to have an affidavit indicating his parents' consent this will be arranged. Has seen his birth certificate; the settlement is being drawn up at the lawyers. Very glad his parents are coming. Will write soon to Sir Henry Howard to let him know the date. Will come over as soon as Bessie wants him to. Bessie made all his family 'very fond of her' when she visited, and his friends who met her also liked her very much.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, - Will see the Dutch consul as soon as possible to get his birth certificate authenticated; his father has told the lawyers to have the settlement ready to be signed by Wednesday, so should be able to cross to the Netherlands that night. Expects Bessie has told Hubrecht that Mr [Henry] Turing [British consul at Rotterdam] has agreed to come on the 7th [for the wedding. He, his father, and the lawyers, have approved the contract of marriage which Hubrecht sent; details about its return. Will be at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, from tomorrow until he comes over.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinse[gracht], the Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Explains why she feels her days of 'pure musical enjoyment' are probably over and her feelings about this; knows he would like her to find musical interests in England, and she will try, but it is unlikely to be the same and she will have to go 'miles out of her way' to find it; would certainly like him to be there with her if she does find anything like the same milieu. Has had a kind letter from Bob's mother sending the programme for the concert; knows the Schubert quartet well; asks if Bob also heart the Beethoven serenade string trio. Very glad he feels he is understanding German more easily now; was disappointed when he declared on one of his first nights at Ede that nothing would every make him learn it, though he soon pleased her by offering to help Bramine to wash up the tea things. Her cold is gone: Emser pastilles are 'an excellent thing'. Has been having 'endless' conversations with her uncle about the wedding; this morning she was managing to keep her patience with his 'little objections and obstacles' but her aunt nearly lost hers. The conclusion is that Bob should write to the British consul at Rotterdam, Henry Turing, asking if he will be able to be present at the civil ceremony in the Stadhuis; he should send the letter through Sir Henry Howard, who has kindly written to Bob, and explain their plans to him; Thursday of Whit week is the best day. They should not ask the consul to be a witness, as her uncle wished, since then he would have to be invited to the breakfast and would be the only stranger there. Has been thinking about her wedding dress: looking at white silks, sketching out designs including a Watteau pleat as she loves these, and talking to her dressmaker. Funny that Bob has also been thinking about his clothes; would recommend high trousers and a frock coat, in a blueish rather than yellowish grey. Dutch men wear evening dress when they are married, but since Bob is an Englishman she thinks he should wear his frock coat. Asks whether it is in good condition; her aunt was saying yesterday that she was looking forward to seeing him 'well-dressed & in neat clothes... [for] the first time!'; tells him to bring some nice suits over too for other occasions. Haverschmidt, who wrote under the name of Piet Paaltjens, is the Dutch poet Bob asked about. Could not find the Heine song Bob tells her about; a Heine song she has copied out originally enclosed in turn. Went to an 'wonderful' concert last night by George Henschel and his wife [Lilian Bailey]; he sang the Schubert "Gruppe aus dem Tartarus", which [Thomas Sturge? or George?] Moore sang in Cambridge. Is very pleased with the silk she has chosen, which she describes. Tells Bob to enjoy himself at Holman Hunt's

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E. C. and forwarded to him at Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall. - Her uncle has gone to his meeting, so she has not been able yet to ask him about Bob's letter to [Henry] Turing; should be able to do so before dinner and send off this letter then; would like it to reach Bob tomorrow in London if possible. Now feels they ought to invite Turing to the wedding breakfast; they need not ask him to be a witness, since Louise [Hubrecht?]'s brother or [Abraham?] Bredius could do that, but Ambro [Hubrecht] and Marie, whom she visited at Utrecht last Sunday, both thought he should be invited to the meal; recommends that Bob not mention it in his letter, and when they ask him at a later date 'if he is a tactful & discreet person he will refuse'. Agrees with her uncle that Bob should write to the consul, and not just to Sir H. H. [Henry Howard, the British ambassador] since there are many legal arrangements to make with which Sir Henry would not be able to help; does not want to come under obligation to invite Sir Henry and his wife to the wedding, especially as he is a 'kind of relation'; will however explain Bob's objections to her uncle. Has had quite a lot of worry about these questions - had to go to bed 'in a flood of tears' one night when she was finishing "Cyrano de Bergerac' - but is feeling calmer about them now.

Takes up the letter again having talked to her uncle; as expected he thinks that Bob should send a letter to Turing through Sir Henry Howard and adds that it shows respect to Turing to communicate with him directly. Hopes Bob will write from Cornwall. Thanks him for enclosing the poem, which she likes very much; also found the Heine song and saw that Bob 'really can write German now' though he still makes some mistakes. Draws a sketch of what she would like to look like on her wedding day to show what a Watteau pleat looks like [see 9/45]; she will not look exactly like a Watteau lady, as they often wore very short petticoats and were much décolleté. Tells Bob the groom usually gives the bride an orange flower bouquet. Encloses a piece of the silk from which the dress is to be made. Is going to dine with her aunt now; signs off with Dutch endearments.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague; addressed to Bob at Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall and forwarded to him at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London. - Will study the patterns Bob has sent her and send them to London, with her choice for his 'nuptial trousers' and travelling suit. Will speak again to her uncle about Bob's objections to writing himself to the consul [Henry Turing]. Entreats Bob for Sir Henry House and his wife not to be invited to the wedding breakfast: her uncle and aunt, who will send out the invitations, do not know the Howards at all so it does not matter that they are 'very distant relations', while their presence would give 'a different ton to the whole business' and make her miserable. It is also likely that Grandmont and Bramine would not come if the Howards were invited, due to their objection to 'jingos'. Does not see it as necessary to invite the Howards, unless Bob's parents wish it especially. Sometimes wishes they could marry 'quietly without anyone near', though knows it could be a lovely day with happy memories; wishes people could 'take it easier'. Returns to the letter after a walk with her aunt, who agrees with her about having to give up part of her musical interests after marriage; understand what Bob means, and thinks she may have expressed herself too strongly in her first letter [9/45], which is the 'wretched side of correspondence'; will wait until she sees him to discuss it. Sees what Bob means about Mrs [Helen] Fry's cigarette smoking; cannot quite feel as he does yet; knows she does have 'a great and natural tendency to rectilineal & rather exclusive argumentation'; hopes she can 'suspend judgment' as Bob says. Does not know enough about German literature to comment on what he says about German literature, but emphasises the advantage, 'which the English nation as a whole is slow & rare in acknowledging' of being able to talk to foreigners in their own language; as an example, it was a real shame that Bob and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen were unable to converse properly; this is why she was so disappointed when he once refused to learn as 'it seemed such an insular British way of looking at it'. Ordered the book [Stevenson's "The Suicide Club"] for Jan [Hubrecht] and he was very pleased. Mr Kattendijke and Mr Loudon are coming to make music this afternoon. Lula [Julius Röntgen] is recovering from his severe illness. Joachim is going to play with his quartet in Amsterdam next Saturday, and Mien has got her a ticket; will stay with Mrs Guye [or Guije], Gredel's mother; would love to go to the supper party the Röntgens are having for Joachim after the concert but expects Mien has too many guests to invite her. Is glad not to see Bob with his beard, and hopes he never decides to grow one. Asks who Jacobi is, and for Bob to tell him what 'the Cambridge Moore [i.e. George] thinks of his play.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague; addressed to Bob at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London. - Returns the samples of cloth, with comments on which she prefers for Bob's travelling suit; for his [wedding] trousers thinks he should find a light blueish grey cloth and encloses a sample of the colour she recommends; tells him not to get the coat of his travelling suit made too short as her aunt thinks he looks as if he is growing out of his old one. Has looked up the address at the British consul at Rotterdam, Henry Thuring [sic: Turing]; her uncle remains of the opinion that Bob should write to the consul and she agrees this is much more courteous; suggests he send the letter to Sir Henry Howard with a note informing him of their plans. Her uncle has been reading the marriage contract to her; it goes now to the notary 'for a last polish' and will soon be sent to Bob for his approval. Asks him to tell her when he does the shopping in London for the beds; discusses the things which his mother is kindly going to send some things from Welcombe. Will write to Charles and George [Trevelyan] to thank them for the music box. Goes for a lesson in Amsterdam [with Eldering] on Friday, and will stay the night with 'cousin [Gredel] Guye'; then goes to stay with an aunt at Hilversum till Sunday; will spend Sunday with her [half] sister [Theodora] who 'lives in the farm with her husband the socialist', and return to Amsterdam to [her sister] Mien, who has invited her to stay for the evening entertainment after Joachim's concert to meet him. When Joachim plays at the Hague next Friday, she will go with Alice Jones, who is staying a little longer than [her brother] Herbert. Cannot fit in a visit to Almelo [to see her friend Jeanne Salomonson Asser] and her other sister [Henriette] before May. Asks Bob to bring 'the gold spectacles' with him when he comes over. Tuttie [Hubrecht] is coming on May 17 or 18; her own birthday is on 21 May, asks if Bob could come before that. Encloses a newspaper cutting with a poem by Vondel's contemporary Hooft, translated by

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

c/o Mrs Salomonson, 49 Wierdensche Straat, Almelo; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Has been a week since Bob last wrote; hopes he is all right, and that he is in the country enjoying the sun. Went for a long drive yesterday to a place with an old castle and 'lovely wood' where they sat outside and had lunch; Jeanne [Salomonson Asser] seems well and happy and is very kind; gave Bessie a 'wonderful piece' of imitation Venice lace which she had worked herself, as well as an antique copper basket for flowers or fruit; Jeanne's husband went away yesterday, and Bessie is not sorry that she will see little of him again since she does not like him much, though he and Jeanne are happy and seem well suited. Jeanne has confided some little worries about her marriage which Bessie will tell Bob about later; does not think Jeanne ought to reproach herself as her husband does not seem to completely understand her. Received a telegram from Alice Jones this morning asking if she could come two weeks later; this will not be possible as they are repainting the rooms then and Bessie will be too busy; hopes Alice will still come. Writes later after receiving Bob's two letters. Discusses the material for Bob's wedding clothes again. Is glad he has written the letters to Sir Henry [Howard] and the consul [Henry Turing]. Would love to go to see Dan Leno with Bob some time. No reason why Bob should not go on sending letters to Irene Locco and writing letters to her, as long as Bessie and Bob love each other 'in the right way'. Tomorrow it is 'Venus day', as well as birthday and death day of Shakespeare. Is reading Turgenieff's "Väter und Söhne" [Fathers and Sons], which she thinks Bob has talked about, having read it in English translation as "Generations"; thinks it wonderful.