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Papers of Robert Calverley Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan Prestwich, Mary Barrow (c 1843-1924) housekeeper to Sir George and Lady Trevelyan, known as Booa
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Good to hear from Elizabeth [about Ravello]; sure 'the two elderly gentlemen' will be pleased to have them at meals; hopes she does not walk alone in 'very wild parts' because of 'wild dogs and uncultivated natives'. George has had his friend Robertson to stay and has just 'walked him off to Reedsmouth' in a downpour to meet his bag and go on to Carlisle. Has been busy with last arrangements and interviews; they leave by the early train on Thursday. Booa [Mary Prestwich] has left for Welcombe today. Sir George has been well recently but has just got a cold. Glad Elizabeth is going on with the translation, and looks forward to reading it; always thinks it 'foolish to spend time in translating french books, as everyone can read french', but very few people read Dutch. '[V]ery cheerful that the Liberals have 'won the Newmarket [by]election most triumphantly' [candidate Charles Rose]. Charles has not yet returned from Scotland; seems to be having a good time. Asks to be remembered to Mrs Reid and Madame Palumbo; asks if 'the old man at the Capucini at Amalfi' is still alive.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Rome. - Has read Elizabeth's letter again, and sees that she needs to get 'some little establishment in Kensington' so Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] will be no use. Suggests asking Imogen [Booth?] and Maud, who may have a friend willing to let a little flat; hears lodgings in London are 'very trying'. Thinks it would be good for Julian, who 'knows only too well how important he is' and has tempers; asks if Elizabeth could get Dr [Carter?] to visit when he is upset to see if it has a physical cause. Mary [George and Janet's daughter] was much improved in temper when less in the nursery; thinks clever children need more to occupy themselves and therefore would suggest a 'nursery governess'. Charles visited the Montessori schools here and was impressed, though he thought success 'depended on the teacher'; suggests that Elizabeth go and see the class. Does not think they can get to England before 20 January. Reminds Elizabeth how bad the [London] fogs are that month. Returns to the letter next day, reporting that the doctor thinks she is getting on very well. They will only stay a night or two at Grosvenor Crescent; tells Elizabeth to contact Booa [Mary Prestwich], who is there now.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Brieg [Brig-Glis]. - The [Italian] lakes did not suit Sir George and his rheumatism was bad for a few days; they had good weather at Menaggio and Baveno; Friday was wet, but they went to Domodossola. Had a 'splendid' day yesterday driving over the Simplon [Pass]; they stop at Brig today then tomorrow go to Zermatt as the hotels at Saas Fee, where they had intended to go, are not yet open. Booa 'enjoyed herself immensely' yesterday, and is 'rejoicing' to be back in Switzerland. Hopes that Elizabeth and Robert will be able to show her the foundations [of their new house] if she comes to visit them. Will not be away later than 26 June. Good of Robert to look through the proofs of George's book ["England Under The Stuarts"]; looks forward to seeing his article soon. Odd to be away from letters and papers for a while. Asks if Elizabeth has had any music since Whitsun. Does not think the northern Italians sing much, but there was some 'pretty, gay, playing' in the evenings at Basseno. Has been sketching a little and feels idle. Would like to 'bring home' some of the Swiss cows which 'look so clean and clever', and come to drink in the fountain in the square twice a day. Elizabeth must tell Gussie [Enticknap] that if he were a Swiss boy he would have to mind the goats on the hillside and 'do all his school-going in the winter'. Asks if they have had any other visitors or 'gaieties'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan and R. C. Trevelyan

Cadenabbia. - Got engaged this morning to Janet Ward. Everyone 'who is most nearly concerned is very pleased', and when they meet her Elizabeth and Robert will be no exception. The wedding will not be until next spring, and the news will be a secret for a month or so; they can, however, ask his parents and Charles more about it and about Janet since he himself must be away for the next three weeks. His housemates Hilton Young and Robin Mayor also know about it, as do 'dear Theo [Llewelyn Davies] and Booa [Mary Prestwich]'. He and Janet are very much in love.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Geneva. - Came on here from Chamonix yesterday because of bad weather. Discusses arrangements for visiting Elizabeth; would be glad to see B[ertrand] Russell and his wife if they are there. The end of the holiday is approaching and she is in some ways happy to be leaving the mountains, which are 'very, very wonderful' but 'one gets a little oppressed with them'. Booa [Mary Prestwich] was quite unwell at Chamonix, but is better today. Hopes the second concert went well.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Thanks his mother and father for their letters; will reply to his father from abroad. The Chinese poems [see 46/102] were by Professor Giles, not him; one day he will bring the book [Giles' Chinese Poetry in English Verse] to Wallington, as some of its poems are 'very amusing, and others quite pretty'. Copies out one he might send to George, An Agnostic, by an anonymous poet, 'a contemporary of Voltaire'.

Thought George's article 'a little over-emphatic in places', but essentially agreed with it, and thought it 'much better written' than his previous articles in the Nineteenth Century, Heart of the Empire etc; is glad to see his book [England under the Stuarts] is getting good reviews. He himself plans to write 'a comedy... or else a comic prose story', although he may change his mind when he reaches Italy; he does not want to write 'any long serious poem or play'. They are glad Meg Booth can come out to Italy later; thinks she will 'prove an excellent companion'.

The [new] house is getting on well, and is now 'quite roofed'; they have been 'arranging for a more satisfactory approach by making the drive longer', which will cost more but 'be better in the end'. Will not decide finally until they have estimates. The Vaughan Williamses are not putting 'difficulties in the way' of their new plan, which is good. Bessie has made arrangements for some work to be done in the garden while they are away in Italy; she will write to Caroline as soon as they get there; their address will be care of Bernard Berenson at I Tatti. Bessie also thanks Booa [Mary Prestwich] for her letter, but is too busy packing now to reply; will write from Italy.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Cambo, Morpeth. - Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s funeral went 'very well today'; the weather allowed 'long views of the moors and hills she loved'. The cortège went from Wallington to Cambo, and she was buried in the churchyard 'almost next to' their grandfather [Sir Charles Edward Trevelyan]. Asks Bob to tell Bessie that 'Mary has developed one of her enthusiasms for William III and Holland', since she is studying 1688 as a 'special period' [at university], and has tried to learn some Dutch. They are going to the Netherlands at Easter partly because of this; should meet and discuss before then.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Elizabeth's letter arrived by the evening post yesterday, as always. They are having a heatwave; sorry it was not better weather for Elizabeth's visit. Pleased to hear about the good beginning on [Elizabeth and Robert's new] house; tells her to be careful of the long walk there; she and Sir George went to Greenleighton yesterday with Booa [Mary Prestwich] and Cooper, taking tea, and she felt quite worn out. Has had a nice letter from Paul Hubrecht, who seems to have much enjoyed Northumberland and writes 'wonderfully good English'; criticises the British lack of facility with other languages. Originally enclosing a letter from Audrey [Trevelyan?] and one from 'young [Henry Graham?] Dakyns'; asks whether he is married. Sorry Miss [Lily] Noble's invitation came too late, and hopes Elizabeth can go another time; thanks her for sending it. A lady who called yesterday said there were good stone seats and garden ornaments at the Italian Exhibition in London; it closes on 1 October and the visitor was planning to get some right at the end when they would be sold off cheaply. Thought Elizabeth might like to see them, and she could let Caroline know if anything might suit them. Glad the Enticknaps are well. Hopes Elizabeth will find someone to go with her this winter; would be happier if she had a companion 'during R[obert]'s wanderings'; supposes Meg Booth would not do; Caroline does not know her well but she is 'quieter than Imogen'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - The hard weather has 'carried off quite a group of [Sir George's] old London friends', leaving the same sort of gap as was left in his college circle by the deaths of Bowen, [Henry] Sidgwick and Edward Young. Goschen, Davey, Godfrey Lushington, and Allendale ([Wentworth] Beaumont) have all died within about a fortnight. Caroline and Booa [Mary Prestwich] much enjoyed their visit to the Shiffolds and meeting Paul. Was very lucky not to break his hip; is still lame. The Lords have 'a reform bill of their own House'; the "Times" seems not to think this is the business of the Commons, which is 'all very well if the same theory is adopted reciprocally' but they threw out the Plural Voting bill last year.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - She and Sir George will be delighted to stay at Elizabeth's lodgings [at Eastbourne] for a couple of days; thinks Booa [Mary Prestwich] will come but they need to 'settle about housemaids'. Caroline's throat is nearly better, though she has bad rheumatism in her back. Knows Elizabeth will take care of her; will be glad to see 'the dear boy [Julian']. Not sure whether to bring Henry [Lane, the footman?]; difficult to know where he would eat, but 'he is very useful & nice & could wait at table'. Was good to see Robert this morning.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad that Elizabeth is comfortably settled in her lodgings [at Eastbourne]. She and Sir George went to the Burlington Hotel there a while ago; she was not impressed by the food but expects the Grand is worse, 'it certainly looks seedy'. Is not sure when they can come, since she has been ill and it is still very cold. Was glad to see Robert, though he 'seemed tired and out of spirits', hopes he is better; very sorry for Elizabeth's 'domestic worries'. Longs to see Julian; hopes Mrs Catt [the nurse] will soon be better. Wants to take Booa [Mary Prestwich] to stay with Miss [name illegible] while they are at Eastbourne, which would 'do her good'. Annie [Philips] is coming on her way to Pen Moel; the news of Meggy [Price] is bad and Phil [Morgan Philips Price] has 'not been heard of for some time'. Newspapers very interesting at the moment. Asks if there would be room for her and Sir George at Elizabeth's lodgings.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Booa [Mary Prestwich] got Elizabeth's letter this morning; Caroline is upset that her chilblains are still so bad. Booa will try to get something which will help her; thinks the cold has been too much for her in 'that Italian-built house'. Wishes she were here so that she and Booa could nurse her; it is very cold in the passages here but the rooms are 'comfortable enough'. Asks whether an upstairs room would be better; Sir George had the room Elizabeth is staying in and Caroline was struck by its chilliness. Hopes Meg Booth will arrive soon and cheer Elizabeth and Robert up. Asks if Robert is getting his walks on the hills. Sir George has given her the Brownings' letters this morning, they are 'very interesting & delightful' though she is not sure whether they should have been published.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to get Elizabeth's card and find she was out again; she must take care of herself; glad the weather has improved. Herbert Paul, Theodore [Llewelyn Davies], and Mr [J. W.] Mackail are staying with them; Mrs Paul and Mrs Mackail are ill. They make an 'amusing trio, & the talk is very good'. Hopes the Booths will reach Ravello soon; Theodore has seen some of the family and thinks Charles plays to stay at Ravello with Meg for a while; he will be good company, but they 'must not let him convert [them] to Protection[ism]!'. Very pleased by the North Dorset [by-]election; thinks the country is 'heartily sick of the Tories' but that they will keep hold of office for 'some time longer'. Sir George does not know Mr [Thomas Stewart] Omond, but he seems to have written many things as well as his book on [poetic] metres. She and Booa [Mary Prestwich] are pleased the shoes fit Elizabeth. Planning to go to London on 16 February.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear that Elizabeth is well and that Robert is losing his cold; hopes the Booths [Charles and Meg] arrive safely. Sir George has been troubled by rheumatism for a while; thinks he is recovering but he is 'low & out of sorts'; he has been able to work and take walks everyday, not liking to stay in bed which she thinks may have been best. S[idney] Colvin and Morton Philips are coming on Sunday, alone as both their wives are ill; they have also had neighbours visiting for tea. Has been busy with things in the village; Mr Clarke was here this week. They are expecting news from Cheyne Gardens [of the birth of Janet and George's child]; the preparations were made long ago. The ["Independent] review" is 'in a bad way' but George 'has made up his mind to it'. Meggy [Price] has sent her a very amusing letter from Phil [Morgan Philips Price], who 'led the interruptions' at [Henry] Chaplin's meeting at Cambridge in 'a most intelligent & effective way'. Sir George enjoyed Robert's letter about classics and 'keeps it as a marker!'; sends love from him and Booa [Mary Prestwich], who was 'quite anxious' about Elizabeth.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The Shiffolds. - Is writing before he goes to bed to let her know that all is well; the telegram from Welcombe came this morning and they were glad that their wire [46/118] had reached her. Bessie is 'really very well, and very little tired'; the baby [Paul] is also doing well, 'sleeps a great deal, and does not cry much when he is awake'. Robert 'cannot say he seems... beautiful exactly, but on the other hand he is not ugly, and at least he has plenty of hair'. The Enticknaps say he is like Robert, but he can't judge. The nurse is 'very satisfactory' and Bessie likes her.

Sent 'the little sweets [muisjes]' to his father and Booa in the last post; it seems to be an 'old Dutch custom' to give them to friends and relations, and they should be 'eaten sprinkled on bread and butter'. Has been busy sending 'post cards and telegrams etc', will probably have more time to write tomorrow.

Tovey's concerto was 'splendidly played by Richter's orchestra'; Richter seems very pleased with it and wants to do it again. Robert 'found it rather difficult, but liked some of it very much'. Bessie sends her love and Pauls'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - If it suits Elizabeth to come later, will be glad to see her then. Mary is 'laid up' in bed on Dr [Ethel?] Williams' advice, though Caroline does not think 'anything will go wrong'. Has been sitting with her, and yesterday looked after 'a picnic party of Women Liberals' for her. Discusses the question of nurses; thinks that Mrs Catt should take a longer holiday. Hopes Elizabeth's 'suspicions' [of pregnancy] are true; she must not worry, and take care. She would like Mrs Catt to come back herself, but thinks Booa [Mary Prestwich] is doubtful. Mrs Davidson says that Mrs Enticknap is coming soon [to visit Gussie]. A postscript on a separate sheet says she is sending Elizabeth a blouse from Interlaken; has been to visit Mary and hopes she will be well in a few days; does hope Elizabeth is right [about pregnancy] as it would be 'good for Julian and everyone'; recommends again that Elizabeth should put off the decision about nurses to see whether Nurse Catt really is better.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Will send this letter to Florence as expects Elizabeth and Robert will leave Ravello today; sorry that they have not had good weather. Has been very busy this week visiting Cheyne Gardens: [George and Janet's new baby Mary] is very sweet and Janet is doing well; George was worried until it was over but now is cheerful. He and Sir George, and perhaps Charlie, are going to Cambridge next Friday to vote against compulsory Greek; they do not expect to succeed but there is 'a great rally on both sides'; it is said it would be carried if it depended on the residents. The Watts and Whistler exhibitions [at the Royal Academy and the New Gallery, Regent Street] are both 'most interesting collections', and there is a 'wonderful show of Oriental China in Bond Street'. Asks if Elizabeth and Robert will prefer to go straight home or stay the night in London; is anxious to see them again. It will be interesting for them to see the [new] house and the Enticknaps' baby. Sorry that Charles Booth is still so unwell; has not quite understood whether Mary and Imogen joined them. Glad Elizabeth is not going to Holland; thinks it would be too cold and damp. There is much illness about here; Uncle Harry has bronchitis, and Nora [Trevelyan?] a bad cold. They have decided to keep the old Broadwood piano in London, and want Elizabeth to choose a little one for Welcombe before Easter. Has heard no music, but they have been to a Bernard Shaw play ["John Bull's Other Island"]. Booa [Mary Prestwich] cheerful and looking forward to seeing Elizabeth; Janet much pleased with her letters. '"Mother" [possibly Florence Bell?] is very active and... good on such an occasion'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Has been in town since Monday, and is taking the next train back to Dorking. Comments on her last letter, and their love. Will probably go to Cornwall on Wednesday 11th and stay a week. Went to Roger [Fry]'s lecture yesterday; Helen has had a slight attack of pleurisy and is unwell. Went with his mother to hear Isaye [sic: Eugène Ysaÿe] last Monday. The music box [which Charles and George intend as a wedding present] looks pretty; describes it and gives a sketch and section, with measurements; she must decide and he will tell George. Booa [Mary Prestwich] asks if he would like a small travelling clock or piece of silver as a present from the servants; she thinks the clock and he tends to agree; it is very kind of them and he will value it 'far more than its mere worth'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Elizabeth must be finding the heat very trying, as she is. Mary is recovering well [after her miscarriage]; C[harles] is coming this week. She and Booa think Elizabeth has made the best decision about the nurses, though it is very sad that Mrs Catt is not well enough to return. Thinks Julian may talk when he is sharing the day nursery with Mary and Humphry; Janet says Humphry 'chatters incessantly'. Asks her to thank Robert for sending the poem; is sorry that Robert has been worried about the opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]; Hugo Bell reported that [Donald] Tovey was very interested in his work on it. Tovey must be a very pleasant guest; sends her regards. Glad Elizabeth has the Reas as neighbours; it 'makes so much difference to have one house where they are not just local'. Is not giving a party for her neighbours this year, due to Molly's indisposition, so is asking them to small tea parties. The E[xhibition] is on Saturday, and the tenants party on the 24th. Mrs Rea's puzzle was very difficult, and she had to come and help Sir George with it; it was 'so ugly too' but interesting. They are 'shocked and grieved' by the strikes and riots; finds it hard to understand; does not quite agree with Sir George about it. Glad the Peers gave way, or there would have been a 'great reaction'; the crisis is now over and the Tories divided, so something must be done. Sir George has inflammation they think must be gout in his finger. Glad the fruit arrived in decent condition.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The Shiffolds, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking. - All well: Bessie is 'getting stronger quickly' and the boy [Paul] 'usually sleeps and feeds well'. Thanks her for her last letter, and Bessie thanks Booa for her letter. Lady V[aughan] Williams called yesterday and 'admired Paul very much'. Does not think the snow here is as bad as in many places: it is only about 3 inches thick. Encloses G[eorge's] letter, which is 'very interesting'. Is 'glad Aunt Annie is enjoying her travels'.

Bessie would like to know how long his parents will be at Welcombe. She says she is 'perfectly happy being quite idle in bed, and feels very warm and cosy'. Thanks his mother for suggesting he comes to Welcombe: might do so for a 'day or two in January', but since their plans are unsettled will 'leave it now'. Sends all love from all of them to his parents.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The Shiffolds, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking. - Bessie is doing well, and 'sits up in bed a great deal'; Paul is also well. The thaw 'set in last night', and Robert hopes it will continue. Sees in the papers that Wallington is 'cut off': that is 'unpleasant' but may not matter so much, but it could be 'serious for some of the scattered farms' and he hopes it will not last long. Bessie says that 'but for Paul' his parents might both be snowed in at Wallington, so 'in spite of all the inconvenience he has caused' he may at least have saved them from that.

They have not suffered much here as the snow was never too deep. Some of the neighbours have influenza: both at High Ashes [home of Sir Roland and Lady Vaughan Williams] and Mrs Vaughan Williams at Leith Hill Place, so they 'must take care not to let it come here'. Has 'Sent Jim [? Conrad's Lord Jim, see 12/105] by this morning's post': it is Tom [Sturge] Moore's, but he 'won't want it back yet'. Wonders whether his father will 'make anything of it': Robert 'found it tough at first, but afterwards was quite held by it'.

The doctor has just come and says Bessie is 'doing very well indeed'. Has been writing many letters recently, some at Bessie's dictation. People have been 'most kind in writing', some have sent presents for Paul. Hopes his parents and Booa are well; sends love and 'best wishes for 1907' from him and his family'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Booa does not think that Emily [Ede, Elizabeth's maid?] is needed, and the nurse and Julian are 'comfortably settled in the nursery'. Glad the household are well; sure Mrs E[nticknap] would sympathise with Elizabeth's news. Julian is very sweet; describes his behaviour. Sorry Elizabeth has to go to Dr Cartier[?].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Good weather yesterday, and Julian had two drives out: he went up early to the Lead Mill with Sir George, who 'walked home shooting and got a hare' which has been sent to Elizabeth; Caroline and Booa [Mary Prestwich] then took him out to Donkin Rigg Farm in the Victoria. This morning it is wet, and he is 'playing about with the engine', with Hearn [the butler] keeping an eye on him. Hopes he will have a good journey tomorrow. Asks Elizabeth where she got the 'ink pills'; would like to give Robin [Price?] some for his journey. Has left a Liberty toy swan on wheels in the dining room at Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent], which Elizabeth should take and give to Julian when he wants something new. Hopes he is '"set up" for the winter (as Annie [Philips] would say)'; sad that the nice time with Elizabeth and the boy has ended.

Letter from Mary Prestwich to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington. - Had heard about the 'great event [his engagement]' in 'Mr Robert''s letter this morning, as a 'great secret', but thanks him for writing to tell her about it himself. Is very happy, and trusts the marriage will bring them 'great happiness mutually'; thinks from all she has heard of his fiancée that he has made a 'wise choice' for his own happiness, and she hopes for Elizabeth's. Hopes Elizabeth will find 'warm hearts to receive her' when she comes to England. 'Sir George and her Ladyship seem very happy about it; she will be a daughter to them'. She herself hopes that Elizabeth will 'let "Booa" [her family nickname] take her in as a part of you'. Has a 'warm feeling for the Dutch', increased at present by this 'unhappy war [the Second Boer War]'. Glad that Elizabeth is going to 'take you in hand, and try and make you tidy', though she does not know yet 'what a task she is undertaking'. Also glad that, as both Robert and his mother have told her, Elizabeth is 'intellectual, and refined, and accomplished'; he will find that as she herself has 'so often tried to impress upon you... it is not impossible to combine the two qualities (tidiness and intellectuality)'. Will have to 'try and turn out' some of Robert's boxes when he invites her to his new house, or fears Elizabeth will be 'still more shocked'. Will write to Anne [?] and Deane [?]; sure they will be pleased to hear the news.

Very kind of 'Miss Bessie' to say she is looking forward to knowing her; will always be pleased to do whatever she can for either of them. Is going with Robert's mother to Cambridge on Saturday, and will 'take tea with Mr. George on Sunday'; is sorry George will not be at home for Christmas, as she loves to have them all here; perhaps this will happen more when they are married.

Letter from Mary Prestwich to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington. - Hears that Robert is home, so is writing to thank him and 'Mrs Robert' for her dress; has had their money for it from his mother; she wore it on Sunday 'for the first time since the 7th' [Robert and Elizabeth's wedding day], and it will always remind her of that day and the week she spent at the Hague. His mother says Robert and Elizabeth are 'both so very busy unpacking and getting straight'; wishes she could help. If she has bought too much linen than Elizabeth needs, asks Robert to say that she herself can use it hear or in London, and pay them for it. Wishes them 'God's richest blessing in [their] new life'. Adds a postscript to say it is the first real day of summer here, and Robert's parents and brother George have gone for 'their long contemplated trip to Wooller [sic: Wooler]'. Hopes Robert will visit soon.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Discusses arrangements for her visit on Wednesday 1 November; Tuesday would be difficult as she has a Com[mittee] all day. If it would be inconvenient due to the departure of Elizabeth's 'troublesome little maid', she could come on the 9th or 10th if she knew at once. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is not coming up before they go abroad, but will be in London over Christmas so Elizabeth could invite her to visit then. Caroline will not bring Pantlin [her maid] so Elizabeth must excuse her appearance. Very sorry about Florence [the maid]; she thinks the mother 'very foolish'. Suggests finding a girl from further away; she herself never takes them from the village as 'they do nothing but talk & gossip'. Asks when Elizabeth and Robert think of going abroad; asks if they will come south, and see Caroline and Sir George in Rome on the way; they start on 12 December. Glad Elizabeth likes the name Pauline; the baby is nice and placid, not as lively as Mary was; Mary does not like her at the moment 'as she is not allowed to seize her by the head, & put her nose into her mouth'; they leave on Wednesday. Thanks Elizabeth for the news about Aunt Margaret [Holland?]. Wonders whether next year Elizabeth should get a 'regular house parlourmaid, & let Mrs Enticknap do the cooking'. Sends love to Robert; glad he is getting some shooting.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Florence. - Is writing before they leave for Rome early tomorrow morning; they have very much enjoyed themselves as there are 'such endless lovely things to see', though the weather has been bad. Glad to hear Elizabeth and Robert have made pleasant arrangements for their winter stay abroad; Elizabeth will be glad not to go as far as Ravello, and 'it cannot be colder!'; hopes she will take warmer clothes with her as there may be a harsh winter. Thinks Florence milder than usual for November. Glad Elizabeth likes the bag; she herself finds one 'a great comfort'. Hopes Elizabeth's 'girl' [a new maid] is doing well, and that Mrs Enticknap likes the idea of training her when Elizabeth and Robert are away. She and Sir George are 'much interested in the political crisis', but she does not think anything will happen for a while. George 'writes in high spirits'; she is glad Elizabeth will see him and Janet; believes Charlie is on a speaking tour. Hopes Elizabeth will see Booa [Mary Prestwich] when she comes up. They can stay at 8 Gro[svenor ] Cr[escent] before they start; there will be 'someone in the kitchen & a man there'. They are excited at going to Rome; they love the art at Florence, but there are 'more and different interests in Rome'. They have not met anyone they know except [Henry] White, the American ambassador, and his wife, who have returned to Rome; will dine with them on Thanksgiving Day next Thursday 'and eat Turkey & Cranberry sauce!'. Has seen in the newspapers that [Joseph] Joachim is 'playing as well as ever'; hopes Elizabeth thinks so. Liked the music when they went to High Mass on Sunday: strings, choir, and occasional organ, 'rather sentimental' but better than in Rome, where she always thinks 'the voices & the organ carry on a sort of contest' as to which can be loudest.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Glad to hear that [Joseph] Joachim was so nice to her; hopes she also enjoyed her evening with the Piersons. Has talked to his father, who has convinced him that they should invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding, as a relative; admits that it would be strange not to do so in England. Told his father it may cause difficulties with the Grandmonts; but he replied that politics should not enter into the matter. In a way it would be a slight to his father, since he wishes it, not to invite them; he would in that case not come over. Thinks that the Howards would not be 'much in the way' at the wedding, especially as his brothers and parents will be there; does not think him 'a bad fellow, and she, though dull, was quite harmless'; will not deny it would be pleasanter if they did not come. More serious if the Grandmonts really object; understands their feelings, though thinks them 'wrong and unreasonable'; they are among Bessie's best friends and good friends of his too, and it is through them that he and Bessie know each other; would be a great pity if they did not come. Does not think the fact her uncle, who will send the invitations, does not know the Howards is 'essential'. She will have to explain the situation to him; then the Grandmonts should probably be told as soon as possible so that they can make a decision. He or his father could write to her uncle to explain if she prefers.

The marriage conditions are all right; both he and his father will write to her uncle about them. Is going to Cambridge tomorrow and will see Tom Moore; wants to read him the two finished acts of the play. Will probably 'take wings' on Saturday evening: become an 'angel' and 'cease to be an active member of the Society of Apostles'. [Oswald?] Sickert is probably coming to Dorking the Sunday after; has worked well recently, and a few visitors will not make much difference. Sanger is back and seems well again, from the little Bob has seen of him. Has been to the tailors and it is hard to find material of the kind she wants; sends some more patterns, which he thinks will look lighter when made up and were lighter than the ones he wore for Roger [Fry's] wedding. The travelling clock which the servants have given them is very good; there was a note with it in Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s handwriting, which he copies out. Wants to write them a thank-you note, but is unsure how to address it; had better ask his mother.

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