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Trevelyan, Sir Charles Philips (1870–1958), 3rd Baronet, politician
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan and G. M. Trevelyan

Verona. - Expects Bobbie and Georgie will be 'quite settled at home' when they get this letter, after a 'very nice stay at the Park' [their aunt Anna Maria Philips's house]. Hopes they will both settle to work at their lessons 'very steadily' after having had a 'famous holiday' and a lot of fun this summer. Sends her love to Miss Martin [their governess], with thanks for her letter; asks them to tell her that she thinks Charlie will be a while writing to her, as he has had to answer letters from 'all his relations'. He seemed 'cheerful' in his last letter. In an old town the other day they saw a high tower with a 'large cage' half-way up, in which 'naughty people used to be put'; asks if they should have one on the tower of the church in Ennismore Gardens. They also saw a large cart filled with grapes which six men were treading with their feet to turn into wine; asks whether they agree the process is 'Rather nasty'. They are going to Venice today; it is now much cooler, as there was a thunderstorm in the night. Hopes they found everyone well at home, and that 'Jemmy Cavendish is glad to be in his own nursery again'. Glad Bobbie has been writing to Charlie.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Got here all right on Monday, with 'no squash in the station stall'; they had the carriage to themselves all the way. They 'went to the "Cat and the Fiddle" yesterday'. They drove by the new road; he and Aunt A[nnie Philips] walked home by the old one, but the others, 'S[ophie], Gran.[papa Philips?], and G[eorgie?] drove home by an entirely different road'. They are going to Chatsworth today. G[eorgie?] seems all right, and Gran.[papa?] and Sophy are 'quite well'. Hopes his mother and the others are 'all getting on very well at Castle Howard'; sends his love to his father and to Charlie. The weather is fine today; has read 'several chapters of Bucland [perhaps a book by Frank Buckland?]' and finds it 'very interesting'.

The last page has a note to Caroline Trevelyan from her sister Anna M. Philips, dated 'August 5th'. She says the boys are being 'very good'; thinks they are 'greatly enjoying themselves'. They are just going to Chatsworth with her father; hopes it will 'not tire him very much'. Sophie is not going. The weather has 'turned very cold': it was 'only 46°[F] yesterday'. Hopes that the Trevelyans are having a 'very pleasant visit'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Decorated with transfer sticker of a sailing ship. Hopes his family are well and happy, as he is. There is a 'rage for Stilographic and Antistilographic [sic] pens'. Hugo has not been expelled. Will be 'very glad' to have a few photographs. Is 'top for the week in Latin'. The exams are this week. Asks his mother to send some stamps, envelopes and note paper. Mrs Arnold gives lectures on botany. Has begun to collect stamps; Smith has given him 21, Browning 7, and Smith is going to give him some more; knows she does not mind. Glad to hear Grandpapa [Trevelyan?] Is better. Robert and Charlie have been writing postcards to each other ‘in the secret way’. Adds a postscript hoping that Sophy is all right.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Expects she got his postcard on Saturday; thanks her for her letter. Shares his bedroom with Law, Lewin, and Booth, though they thought they would have O'Brien. The new boys are Lyall, Barneby and Whitelaw minor. He is now in the Lower First, which consists of Smith, Leveson, Archie, Lawrence and himself; Tomlin and Hales [? are in the Upper First. Lewin comes today. Asks his mother if he can send his stamp book, which he left on a shelf in the night nursery in London. Hopes his father will make a 'successful speech'. A boy here is collecting 'old crests [?]' so asks if she can find any. Hopes Charlie 'has got a good place'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

It 'snowed hard last Sunday, and no one could go out'. Has had a stiff neck and cold, but neither have been very bad. Sorry to hear Charlie has a bad cold and hopes he gets better soon; asks Caroline to thank him for his letter. They had a 'grand set out last Tuesday', which they had as half holiday instead of Wednesday. Mrs Lyell and Mrs Stirling came, and they had charades; will tell his mother 'all about it' in the holidays.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter. Is not yet allowed to go out, but his 'cough is much better'. The boys in his class, 'in order beginning at the top', are Smith, Archie, Browning, Robert himself, Sellar and Lawrence. Has begun studying Caesar and likes it 'very much'; is 'getting on very well in Greek'. Has finished [reading] Winning his Spurs and almost The Young Franc Tireurs [both by G. A. Henty] so will 'soon want another book'. His bedroom at school is shared with the same boys as before: Sellar and Alexander. Alexander says he knows 'a family called the Hol[l]ands very well, with a Meta in them' [like Robert's cousin Meta]; Robert asks his mother to find out if it is the same family. He also asks her to tell Charlie that he will write to him soon, and to thank him for the stamps and letters, 'some of the stamps are rather rare'. Sends love to all. Adds a picture of a townhouse [his family's London home?] below his signature.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Is sorry his mother is unwell; glad it is not serious. A boy called Weston wants to swap butterflies with him; asks if she thinks any would break if she brought his box from home when she comes. Is glad Charlie 'has got those eggs' [also a reference to butterfly collecting?]. The school began bathing on Thursday and the weather is 'beautifully fine'. Adds a postscript saying that he has not caught any butterflies yet, but has a 'Gold tail moth caterpillar'. Hopes his father, Aunt Margaret, and Georgie are well. Has got enough medicine, but Miss Bartlett said his mother might as well bring another 'bottle of Pancraticus, not the milky stuff'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Dated in Latin: 'Ante Diem octavum Kalendas Julias [25 May], A[b] U[rbe] C[ondita] 2441 [year since the founding of Rome, but Robert has miscalculated as this is a 17th century date]. First part of the letter is also in Latin: if his mother and Georgie are well, he and Charles are well [a typical beginning for a Roman letter]; he sends love to all. They will begin to bathe next week, or perhaps this week. The half-holidays are Wednesday and Saturday; it doesn't matter much when she visits, but it would be 'nicer' if she chose one of those days. Is sorry Aunt Margaret is unwell. Asks about Spider and Twopenny. Adds a postscript saying that there will be a match soon, then rounds off the letter with 'finis, τέλος, la fin, the end'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter. Asks if he will go [home?] on Thursday or Friday. Charlie wrote to him yesterday saying he thought they would meet at Rugby; Robert had thought they would meet at Reading. Some jackets came for him, but they were all too small. The school played Farnborough, and had a one-all draw; Robert saw Mure [?] there, who seemed very well. Adds a postscript to say that the Conservatives are in a majority in the Youth Parliament, but that there are nineteen Liberals and seventeen Conservatives in the school. Writes out verse: 'This time 1 week where shall I be, out of the clutches of A. P. E. No more latin no more Greek, no more cane to make you squeak... No more milk in dirt mugs, no more blankets full of bugs... No more nasty bloody mutton, no more shirts without button...'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Chief Secretary's Lodge, Phoenix Park, Dublin. - Is leaving early tomorrow to go to Welcombe; Bob's father is staying until Wednesday night. Has been very busy packing; the 'soldier boxes' will travel in the carriage. Charlie has written in 'very good spirits': he received good marks for his 'holiday task'. Hopes no more boys have got ring-worm, and asks whether the doctor has been to examine them. He must have had some days with good weather for football; asks if he will soon 'go into the big game'. They hope that some of the [Phoenix Park] murderers have been caught, and will be convicted. Hopes Bob gets on well with [Gerard Henry Craig] Sellar and Alexander. Georgie is very well; he is coming to Welcombe on Tuesday. Bob's father sends his love.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Asks her to thank his father for his letter, and tell him that Robert is studying 'the siege of Saguntium, just before Hannibal declared war with Rome' as Alcorus tells the Saguntines they should submit [see Livy]. Will tell Mr Arnold that he [Robert] 'may have the jersey' [see 45/26]. Mr Bent the clergyman is leaving; he showed the boys a 'magic lantern about Sweden and several English cathedrals'. Sends love to all; has written to Charlie.

Sketches in cartoon strip form on third and fourth pages, each with numbers corresponding to a list on fourth page: '1. The Shot; 2. The fall; 3. The flight; 4. The arrest; 5. The transportation to gaol; 6. Kilmanum [ie Kilmainham Gaol in Dublin, where those convicted of the Phoenix Park Murders were imprisoned and executed]; 7. The execution.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

He wrote to Charlie on his birthday and sent him 'a little knife' he had bought here as a present; has bought a 'beutifull [sic] knife, with a railway key in it'. About fourteen 'Eaton boys are coming on Friday' [for a match]. Has 'not much to say'. Sends love to all. Adds a postscript saying that it 'rains hard', and rounding off with 'το τέλος' [The End, in Greek].

Five sketches showing a crash between two steam trains, named 'Angel' and 'Devil'.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley, Winchfield:- If all goes well, Bobbie will be 'sent to Reading on the 20th [of December] to join his brother [Charlie]' at the time she specifies. The 'strain' Bobbie recently suffered to his knee was 'fortunately a matter of no consequence' which only required a few days rest, caused when he 'kicked the ground in trying to kick the ball'; though it was 'very trying for the poor boy to miss playing in a match', there was no need for anxiety nor for a doctor to see him. Bobbie is 'quite well now' and doing 'as satisfactorily as possible' in both work and behaviour. He has 'taken a rather higher place' in his class in nearly all his examinations than he does in his 'weekly marks'. He has done well in Latin, not so well in Greek as he has not been studying it as long as some of the others in his class. Hugo joined the school at half term: he 'seems a very nice boy, delicate but with very good ability', though with 'no systematic training last far'; he seems to have settled down happily. His brother, 'a very nice fellow at Woolwich', has come to visit him, and will do so again.

Asks her to forgive his not answering her letter yesterday: this was due to a pleasant visit from "Mrs (Professor) Sellars'; he did not mean to 'sacrifice [his] duties to the school to [his] duties as a host' but his 'good intentions failed'.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley, Winchfield:- Understands how difficult it must be to arrange to send her boys [Charlie and Bobbie] from Ireland on different days, and has 'real pleasure' in acceding to her request; he supposes that if a 'satisfactory escort should offer itself the right day' she would let Bobbie come. They do 'care very much' about this matter, as cases like this are 'often used as a precedent' by people who have no real reason to delay return. Since, by preparing everything in advance, the school can usually begin work the day after the boys arrive, 'Bobbie will lose rather more lessons' than Mrs Trevelyan imagined; however, they will 'make the best of that' and hopes he will catch up soon. Glad to hear that Bobbie has been 'well and happy' and that she speaks 'happily of his general progress'. They have been 'truly concerned about the Booths' trouble [Tom Booth's ringworm; see 45/116], of which Mrs Arnold has just informed Mrs Trevelyan, and hopes they will soon have good news from Bobbie 'on that score'. Sends best wishes for the new year.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter and the paper. Has not yet written a speech. There are seventeen conservatives and nineteen liberals in the 'youth parliament'. Is going to have dinner with Mrs Arnold this week. May have a chance of a prize for French. There was going to be a match with Farnborough, but a boy there 'has caught an disease'; they are playing 'the Camerons' again tomorrow. Writes the next portion of the letter in Latin: he sends his love to all; is her affectionate son. If she and George are well, he and Charles are well; it is eight in the morning on the Ides of December [13th Dec], 1883; he hopes she is well; nothing stands in the way of him coming home soon. He then switches to French to say he has no more notepaper and envelopes, and asks if she can send some, though he does not need any postage stamps. There is then a line in Ancient Greek: 'the elephants love the keepers'. Asks if he will go home on Friday. Writes 'the end' in English, Latin, French, Italian, Ancient Greek, Spanish.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

On headed notepaper for Welcombe, Stratford on Avon:- Has arrived safely. Uncle Willie and Aunt Meggie [Price] came yesterday; Aunt Meggie is well, though Uncle Willie is 'rather lame'. They have been shooting today; 'several other gentlemen came'. They shot about forty pheasants, forty or fifty rabbits, and seventy rabbits released from bags - there was a black one among these. Grandpapa [Robert Needham Philips] is better, and went out shooting today for the first time this winter.

Is going to get his presents tomorrow. Charlie is well, and has received The Dutch Republic as a [school?] prize. Sends love to all; hopes his parents and Georgie are well. 'Tiny is quite well'. The weather has been 'very fine'; hopes this will continue. Will write again for Christmas day.

Note on last page from Anna M Philips to her sister, addressing her as 'Dearest Carrie'. They have 'had a lovely day for the shooting'; the boys have been 'very good and happy'. Charlie is now reading his book until tea-time, and they will play billiards after that. Both boys 'seem very well... and are very well behaved and no trouble'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

On headed notepaper for Welcombe, Stratford on Avon:- Mrs Kite has come; she is well and sends 'kind regards' to Caroline Trevelyan. Aunt Annie 'has given her 1 mile of cotton. He has had some bedroom slippers from Aunt Annie; a book called Half-Hours with the Stars [by Richard Proctor] from Sophie; a "Status Quo" chessboard [for travel] from his grandfather, which is just what he wanted; a book called Homes Without Hands [by J. G, Wood]; a book called Sheer Pluck [by G. A. Henty] from Charlie; and 'sundry other presents'. The weather is very foggy. Sends love to all. Adds a postscript to say they 'have had nothing but carol singers today', and that he went for a ride with Uncle Willie yesterday and they lost their way.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Otto Trevelyan

On headed notepaper for Welcombe, Stratford on Avon:- Wishes them all a 'very merry Christmas and a happy New Year'. Has sent all his Christmas cards. The weather is fine 'though it freezed this morning'. Went riding yesterday morning, and this morning 'went to Warwick chapel'. They are 'going out rabiting [sic]' tomorrow. Went to Stratford yesterday with Aunt Annie, and bought all his 'Xmas presents'.

Note on last page from Anna Maria Philips, addressed to 'Otto'. Sends Christmas greetings to all, and wishes he, 'Carrie, and Georgie' could be with them. Hopes he will find the silver pencil case which she has sent him: it is 'for the Ink pencil leads'. The boys [Charles and Robert] are 'very good and happy'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Otto Trevelyan

[on headed notepaper for 40 Ennismore Gardens, SW]. Writes to congratulate his father 'on the passing of the County Franchise' [the Third Reform Act]; hopes 'the Lords will not kick it out'. They will finish reading Livy soon, then thinks they will go on to study Ovid and Caesar. There was a 'great thunderstorm' this morning, which has now stopped'. The school played Farnborough last Saturday but 'were utterly thrashed'. Charlie says he can now swim twenty yards after six lessons, 'which is very good'. The school will play 'Hartley-Row' on Wednesday, the picnic is on Thursday, and there will be lots more matches later. Asks his father to thank his mother for her letter; he is getting on well.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Forgot to mention in his last letter that Miss Bartlett says his coat does not fit him but that the tailor says it does. The editors of the paper [the school newspaper] are Leveson and Hicks, but 'Mr Evans really does everything'. The Eton match is on the 28th. Almost everyone, including Robert himself, was ill last night, but he was not bad. 'The answers of the riddles [in the school newspaper?] are in next number'. Adds a postscript hoping that Charlie is all right at Harrow.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for 8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W.]:- Apologises for being 'so long' in writing to his mother this week. Has just got a copy of the Latin prose, which has 'to be shown up in about a month's time, so there is no hurry'. Has not yet got the verse, but it will be given out in a few days. Got his spectacles, which he likes very much, and thinks 'the spring wires a great improvement'. Went to tea with Charlie last Sunday; had 'a very good tea, eggs and bacon', and Charlie looks 'very well'. Robert got a game [of cricket] yesterday, and scored four runs. Hopes his father is well; would like to see his speech on literature and supposes that it will be in the newspapers so will try to find it.

Is 'getting on all right in Glazer's form', but does not know where he will be placed. Is working hard at gymnastics, and hopes to 'get [his] B before the end of the term'. Has given up thinking about his epigram, as he could not write a 'really good one', and will concentrate on the fifth-form verse and prose. Will enter the reading prize, as it 'takes no time, and does not want any preparing'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter and her cake; this was very good, and he and Hicks (who is as old as Robert), had tea with Mr and Mrs Arnold. A boy who was at Wixenford who has just left Harrow, Walford (Hugh Selwyn or Arthur George Walford?), was also here; he was in Watson's house and says he knows Charlie. Robert hopes Charlie is getting on well. Archie has asked Robert to go to see him next holiday in Ireland, but this 'would hardly be possible'; asks his mother if he could go, as he would like to but knows it would 'be rather a business' going to Ireland and back. The weather is very fine today. There was no match last Saturday, as the 'Farnborough fellows' were unwell. It is the Eton match tomorrow, but there are 'only three or four Eton chaps'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Has written to Charlie asking him to send 'his first impressions of Harrow'. Sends the '[school] newspaper for this fortnight', which includes 'a piece of poetry by Kingsl[e]y, which is the first he wrote', sent in by Mr Powles. Robert's 'bedroom is getting on very well'. Sends love to all. There is an away match with Mortimer on the 15th. The weather is 'very fine today'. Sellar and Hugo are coming down on the 13th. The 'book for Archie' is True to the Old Flag [by G. A. Henty].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter, which he got today. Thinks she 'might as well' send him 'Archie's book' [Henty's True to the Old Flag, see 45/48?] straightaway. Is glad 'Papa is well again'. Charlie has sent 'his first impressions of Harrow', which Robert thinks will go into the [school] paper. Sends love to all. 'Grandpapa T[revelyan]' has just sent Robert '20 bob [shillings]'. The school 'played Cameron on Saturday and were licked'; the score was 'equal until about the last minute, neither side having got a goal', until Cameron scored; it was a 'very good game'. Robert was 'on the right wing with Melly. Leveson and Hicks went as reporters'. Is 'getting on very well'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The new masters are Mr Rice Jones, replacing Mr Viner, and Mr Champney, replacing Mr Evans. There are five new boys: Henry, Crocker, Wilder, Smith, and Percival. It is 'awfully hot today'. He got Lorna Doone just in time to pack it into his portmanteau. He and S[ackville?] West do all their classics with Mr Arnold; Robert also studies French and Old Testament Divinity with Arnold, History and Geography with Mr Rice Jones, and English and Euclid with Mr Champney. Mr Rice Jones says that he once stayed at Cambo, and knows Mr Gow [the Trevelyan's land agent at Cambo?] and several others. Sends love to his father and to Charlie, 'if he has not gone to the Park [home of their grandfather Robert Needham Philips] yet'. Adds a footnote with an asterisk saying that he is not sure how to spell Rice and Gow, marking these names in the text above also with an asterisk. Finishes by saying they are playing cricket, and Georgie is 'quite well'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for 40 Ennismore Gardens, SW]. Is 'sorry to hear the elections are going on badly'. It rained this morning, though they got outside in the afternoon. Is just finishing the Odyssey. The school plays Mortimer at home next Wednesday, and Farmbourgh. Hopes that his father is well, and that 'Grandpapa's cold is better'. Sends love to all. The end of term is quite close near. Asks if she has seen 'all the falling stars'. Is glad that C[harlie] is 'so high class'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter. Thinks Georgie is 'quite happy'. Has talked to Mr Cole about a [cricket] bat, who thinks Robert would do best with a '12s 6 d.' one from Lillywhite's. There is going to be a match with a new school at Bracknell belonging to Mr Maresfield. Is 'getting on very well' with Euclid. Tomlin is 'top of his class this week'. Hopes Charlie is doing well. Georgie says he forgot to thank her 'for the bit about Wolseley, it was very interesting'. Hears 'Lord Suddley is dead'. 'Accounts done'. Robert sends his mother the [school news?] paper.

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