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Trevelyan, Sir Charles Philips (1870–1958) 3rd Baronet, politician
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Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Casa al Dono, Vallombrosa (Prov. di Firenze). - Thanks for the letter and Bob's photo. Sympathises with Bessie on the disposal of Bob's library and letters. Thinks Wallington is the place for the letters, if Sir Charles will have them, otherwise some public library will take them; 'they must not be scattered'. Asks her to give his own letters to Bob to Silvia Sprigge, or send them to Umberto Morra. Feels that now Bob is dead and she cannot get about his walks, she would be best to leave the Shiffolds and move up to London. Recently had a visit from Bessie's relative Hubquelet [?].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - Is staying in the 'Blackett' room next to Molly and Charles; Catherine [Abercrombie] is in his old bedroom over the library. Went to the Gibbet yesterday. On Friday they are going to tea with Geoffrey [Young]; unfortunately Len will not be there. Had tea with Edith Bulmer yesterday. Glad Ada is 'well and cheerful'. Has written to [Wilfrid] Gibson about 'Gibson [sic: a slip of the pen for 'Geraldine'] - rather a difficult letter to write'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - The [Cambo] Exhibition went quite well, with only a couple of short rain-storms; watched the sheep-dog trials, and went through the tent which was full of exhibits. Today is wet, but not cold; he is well 'with less tickles [from eczema]'. Catherine [Abercrombie] also seems all right, and is sleeping well. Has not yet seen Edith Bulmer, but has arranged to visit her tomorrow. Geoffrey Young and Len had to go south to see a very ill friend, but they will probably return tomorrow. Geoffrey Trevelyan is here with his child and Gillian; likes 'him a lot, her rather less so'. Liked Clough W. Ellis very much; he 'drew out Charles to talk, and did something to cheer up George'. Sorry to miss Julian and Mary; hopes they will come again soon;; sad about Hogarth. Does not think his spectacles are ready, but Catherine has heard from Odell's about hers; they will pick them up on their way home through London.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - Went to Hallington yesterday for tea; afraid Janet was 'no better, in fact noticeably less well' than when he saw her last, though she tried to be cheerful; she was 'very nervouse [sic] with her hands in a way that was new, and told me the same thing over again'. Clough Williams Ellis was 'very agreeable' and cheered George up a little, he also got Charles to talk; sorry he has gone this morning. The house is not noisy, considering there are 'three or four children in it at present'. Hopes all well at the Shiffolds; asks when the Bluths are coming and whether they are still at Cambridge. No reading aloud here at the moment, so he and Catherine [Abercrombie] sometimes read "Pride and Prejudice". Charles is 'much more affable than he used to be'. It is the Cambo Exhibition, which may involve 'a lot of tiring standing about'. Very glad Ada is at the Shiffolds. Hopes Bessie could make out [Gaetano] Salvemini's address; she should ring up Alys Russell, who will know it, if not; he knows it is 'Miss Massie', but not her initials so cannot look her up.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - Bessie will have got his postcard saying they [he and Catherine Abercrombie] had a good journey; they are now 'having a pleasant time' despite bad weather. Going to Hallington this afternoon. Clough Williams Ellis and his wife came yesterday; they are both 'good company'; there are 'no other grown ups' except Gillian Trevelyan, with her baby. She is 'quite nice, and gets on with everybody'. The children are sometimes noisy, but there are not many of them. The Deed of Conveyance came this morning, which he will sign and send back to Down, Scott and Down today or tomorrow. Will be good to see [Gaetano] Salvemini again; thinks Thursday 31st will be a good day to do so. Glad Ada is with Bessie, and 'in better health'; sends his love to her. Will write tomorrow after seeing George and Janet [at Hallington]. Charles is 'cheerful'; they have played chess, and Bob won. Catherine has not suffered from the journey, but feels the cold; they have a fire all day in the library. Is quite well, 'in spite of tickles [from eczema]'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - They have written to Dr McKenna to see if he can see Bob on Thursday afternoon; would start home from there around 5 pm if so. Will let Bessie know as soon as possible; meanwhile the eczema seems 'a good deal better'. Kitty has gone hiking with a friend, leaving the children here. Molly's laryngitis is 'very much better'. Went to tea [with the Winthrop Youngs] at the Two Queens, which was 'very pleasant'. Charles is 'cheerful and active', and is reading "Middlemarch" to them in the evenings, which he does very well. They have seen Edith Bulmer sever times; she is worried about her boy, Martin, who 'is always getting bad colds and coughs'; she sends Bessie her love. Hopes the Bluths are well; sends his love. Hopes that Mrs MacEvoy is well, and sends 'kind remembrances' to her, Miss Goddard, and Mrs Young.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Shiffolds [this is an error for Wallington]. - Very glad to hear from Bessie's letter that her 'oily difficulties are solved'. His legs are much better, but there is still some eczema on the thighs and arms. Very glad that Morgan Forster is recovering, if slowly. Does not know if he can find a quotation for him [for the libretto of "Billy Budd", see 3/83], but when he returns home to his books he will try; agrees it should not matter whether it is a real quotation. The paper Bessie sent was not an income tax receipt, but a tithe receipt. Went to tea at the Two Queens' yesterday; Geoffrey and Len [Winthrop Young] were both very pleasant, and they hope to see them again. Catherine [Abercrombie] is going by bus to Edinburgh to stay the night with [her son] David one day next week. Kitty's Elizabeth and Catharine arrived this morning, and he thinks Kitty and Erika come on Monday. Things 'seem to go smoothly here'; Charles is 'cheerful'; Molly's laryngitis is much better; Catherine sends love to Bessie. Hopes the Bluths will be able to come; later on if he [Karl] is not better.

Postcard from Catherine Abercrombie to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Everything is going well; Bob is walking a little further each day, though she does not press things; his legs are 'marvellously better with this new treatment'. The Geoffrey Youngs came to lunch yesterday; they will visit them next week. Finds Wallington 'fascinating', and everyone is 'so kind & anxious to do all they can for Bob's comfort'. He and Sir Charles play a game of chess every day.

Letter from Catherine Abercrombie to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - The journey here was 'most luxurious', as Bob will have said, with a 'reserved carriage' to themselves so Bob could 'lie up all the time'. Everything needed was packed, and their welcome was 'most heartening'. Bob's leg is quickly improving, and he seems 'very well in other ways'; he is playing chess with Charles at the moment. The house is warm and everything very comfortable; 'Lady T' [Molly] is 'a dear, but has no voice [due to laryngitis]'. The only other guests are a 'weekending doctor' and his wife [Dr Boon, see 16/51] who 'come often to shoot'. Has not seen the 'treasures' yet, as Bob wants to show them her himself when he is better; the weather is still 'marvellous' so they can sit out in the sun. She was 'rather alarmed by Sir Charles at first, but that has worn off' and he is 'very kind'. Bob sends his love and will write tomorrow.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - Has no news, though Geoffrey and Len [Winthrop Young] are coming to lunch. Will write to Tet Htoot to thank him for the letter [see 17/171]. Thinks his eczema is much better, though there are 'some bad tickles left', Charles is reading "Middlemarch" in the evening, which he does very well, 'simply, not rhetorically'. Molly's laryngitis seems to be improving, though she is still writing out words to save her voice. He is doing some translation of Homer, not much. Catherine [Abercrombie] seems well, and 'enjoys being here'. Has been to see Edith Bulmer, who is well herself but 'as usual worried by the boy [Martin]'s having a bad cold'. Hopes Elizabeth is well, and that she enjoyed Van Stuwe's visit.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - All is well here; the house is kept 'quite warm nowadays' and they 'shut the windows more'. Is breakfasting in his room, but getting up soon after that; has been for some short walks though not yet as far as the garden; is leading a 'lazy life, lying on the sofa a great deal', but has also done some Homer translation. The house is quiet as there are no children here yet; the Weavers are coming in a few days, as are Kitty and her family. The only other guests have been 'Dr Boon and his nice wife and children' who have now left. Charles and Molly 'seem quite harmonious, and in good health except for Molly's laryngitis'. The Geoffrey Youngs have been away, but are now returned and are coming to tea tomorrow; he has been 'very unwell lately'. Bob is staying in the 'tapestry room', which is comfortable though there are 'no clothes pegs, and of course no water'; however, the house seems 'tidier and cleaner than it has been for a long time'. His eczema seems better. Hope Bessie has had a pleasant visit from van Stuwe and feels well and happy. Catherine [Abercrombie] is well, and getting on with Charles and Molly. Very kind of Tet Htoot to send the letter by Bob's grandfather [Sir Charles Edward Trevelyan: see 17/171]; will keep it to show Joan [Allen], and write to thank Tet Htoot. Asks to be remembered to Miss Goddard and the rest of the household.

Letter from Sir Charles Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad to get Bob's Homeric hymn [to Demeter, in this year's "From the Shiffolds"], and would like to know 'more about its preservation and whether it has anything to do with the Homeric poems'; asks how many hymns there are. As usual, much admires the 'grand simplicity' of Bob's rendering. Bob will have heard that [Andrew] Baird has died, in three days of an illness which 'culminated in a brain haemorrhage of the sort that Franklin Roosevelt died of'. He was very rarely ill, so they were 'surprised at the tragedy'; he was a 'grand and trusty fellow' and is a 'lamentable loss to [Charles] and to all the countryside'. Has to find a new forester, a new head gardener, and a new parson for Cambo all at the same time.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Shiffolds. - Was glad to get Bessie's letter; has also had some Wallington news from Bob. Is having a pleasant visit to the Shiffolds: likes the 'helpers and servers' very much. They came to the library one evening with their little girl, and Bob read poetry to them. He and Bob have had one long game of chess, which ended in a draw; Bob seems well and very active-minded, and is translating 'Ibant obscure...' [Virgil, "Aeneid VI"]; is unhappy because he has lost the minute hand of his watch. They are discussing literary subjects and about the past. Has seen little of the 'pleasant-faced dog'. Went to tea with the Wedgwoods [Ralph and Iris] on Saturday; they sent down the car as his 'breathing-machinery' cannot cope with the hill. She should tell Charles [Trevelyan] that he has been enjoying Keith's "Memories of Wallington"; sends his greetings to him and Molly. Remembers Molly as having the sweetest reading voice he ever heard.

Letter from Molly Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - They were glad to get Bob's 'new & attractive little book [this year's "From the Shiffolds"] at Christmas', though it was not until some days of 'enforced leisure with a sore throat' that she had chance to read it: particularly likes the "Trojan Captives" and the "Veil", in which Bob makes such a 'subtle difference' between the two speakers, the Theologian and the Poet.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - They are still having 'wonderful weather, and not too hot', though he fears there may be drought in the South. Kitty has gone with Eka [Erika?] to Edinburgh, but they will be back on Saturday. The house has become 'rather more noisy, but not unbearably so, except at meals'; since Charles and Molly are 'both very deaf', people 'have to shout at them, and they at each other'. Gets little chance to talk to anyone, though has managed to with Kitty on the last couple of days. It will be better when Bessie is here, since Geoffrey and Len [Winthrop Young] will also be staying, and later E. M. Forster for a few days. Jarvis [?] Young is staying this weekend, whom Bob finds 'quite conversable'. Hopes that Bessie will get Julian to take her from Waterloo to Kings Cross; passes on recommendations from Jarvis Young on the journey; will talk about things when he sees her on Wednesday evening. Is going to see John Dower tomorrow for 'the third and last time'. There was a 'lovely' picnic at the Rothley Lake yesterday. Will be good to see Bessie again, even though it will only be for a short time. Has some more proofs to correct and many letters to write.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Written as from Mackenzie Robinson Hotel, Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh. - Expresses his concern over what is happening in India: Masood's son Akbar is here and 'tragic' on the subject; stayed in Washington with the Indian ambassador to the US, Asaf Ali, who was 'all smiles and hopefulness'. Has been sent by the "Sunday Times" to cover the opening of the Edinburgh Festival, but wishes he had not taken it on. Then goes to Wallington to see Trevelyan's brother Charles, and on to York. Hopes to be in Surrey in September and see the Trevelyans. Saw the Whiteheads at Harvard, and Roger Sessions at Berkeley

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Bessie's letter with the six poems came this morning; will see John [Dower] again tomorrow and show him some, though John 'chiefly wishes to show [Bob] some new ones of his own'. John 'talked a good deal' yesterday, but was 'rather breathless'; seems he 'still tries to believe that he can get well'. Is in the room with George L[owthian Trevelyan]'s furniture in which used to be his father's room; the bed is 'very comfortable', though there is 'no washing apparatus'. Besides Kitty and her family there are several children, but he 'can't make out who they all are'; they spend all day outside, and are 'quite quiet as a rule'. There is also 'a Mrs [Esther?] Bicknell' and a friend of Kitty's whose name he has forgotten; and a daughter of Sybil Thorndike [Ann or Mary Casson] who sings 'chiefly folk-songs - not very interesting, but quite nice'. Len and Geoffrey [Winthrop Young] are coming just as he leaves, but Bessie will see them. Charles and George have gone out shooting; saw George at breakfast, and expects he will visit him [at Hallington] before he leaves on Tuesday. Expects Bessie will soon hear from Miss Dyson; asks whether 'that really is a certainty now'. Asks to be remembered to Miss Cook. Forgot to give Bessie a 'note Ursula Wood made about nurse-housekeepers', which he thinks might be worthwhile Gordon B[ottomley] trying; sends it now to send on if he thinks it worthwhile. Sends love to Bessie; is sorry he will not be at Wallington with her, but at least will see her on 27 August.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Marked 'Private'. Bessie's letter with enclosures came this morning; thought what Rex Warner said about Lucretius was quite good, though agrees with Bessie it was 'quite dull and wordy'; he should not have quoted 'so many Latin lines on end'. Does not know whether they [the BBC?] will let him read his script and the quotations, and will 'make a stand' if necessary. [Edgar] Bainton was 'very nice in his gentle friendly way' and did not seem much older. He is seeing BBC people tomorrow, and would like to see Bob again at the Shiffolds; perhaps that could be arranged at the end of August or beginning of September, as Bainton will quite soon return to Australia. Saw van Stuve briefly, who was very sorry he could not visit Bessie. Julian seemed 'quite cheerful'; he had enjoyed Frants [Röntgen?]'s visit and they got on well together. Agrees Miss Cook is 'a surprizing person'; expects she will enjoy herself at Wallington and get on with people. Miss Clark is here for several days, 'which is rather a bore'. Kitty is looking forward to seeing Bessie; her children are amusing; Elizabeth is 'quite a comic actor', and he expects 'rather a problem'. Has had 'rather a sad letter' from Irene [Cooper Willis?], whose little niece Patience is leaving England for good soon because her parents are going to live in Trinidad. Irene will be back on the 22nd so Bob will see her some time. Tells Bessie not to worry about the poems in his bureau drawer; had thought of showing a few to John [Dower] or Kitty. George Mac[aulay Trevelyan?] is coming tomorrow, so Bob will see him. Wonders if Bessie has heard anything definite from Miss Dyson. Has 'hardly seen Charles or Molly to talk to yet'; there was a Women's Institute meeting here yesterday.

Postcard from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Apologises for asking in his letter yesterday whether Bob had received his book ["English Social History: A Survey of Six Centuries: Chaucer to Queen Victoria"], when Bob's letter of 7 August mentions its arrival. Janet is reading [Bob's] "Windfalls" 'with great delight"; George has said how much he himself enjoyed it. They will look out for Robert Lloyd when term begins.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne. - Sends Bob an enclosure to 'deal with'. He and Janet are here in the gardener's cottage for August. The hospital in the Hall is 'full of convalescent wounded from Normandy - nice fellows who like the quiet of the place'. Charles and Molly 'seem well and happy'. The news of Tom [Sturge] Moore's death made him think very much 'about old days'; there was a 'nice article' about him by Desmond [MacCarthy] in the "Sunday Times". Hopes that Bob will soon get a copy of his new book, in fact written 'some years ago' ["English Social History: A Survey of Six Centuries: Chaucer to Queen Victoria "], which he has asked Longmans to send.

Draft [?] letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Winston Churchill

The Shiffolds. - Is sending the Prime Minister a report of a speech given by his father at the Whitefriars Club dinner, about forty years ago, which he recently found amongst his papers. If Churchill has not seen it before, thinks he will be interested in what Sir George Trevelyan said about his father Randolph, for whom Trevelyan thinks his father 'had a real affection as well as admiration'. Sir George once told him how, just after Gladstone brought in his first Home-Rule Bill, he walked away from the House with Lord Randolph; they had to part ways at the bottom of St James's Street but stood there for some time while Lord Randolph gave him a forecast of what would happen. Robert supposes 'his prophecy did not include the Parnell divorce case', but Sir George said practically everything else came true. The Prime Minister knows Robert's brothers, but he expects he will not remember him, though they must have been at Harrow together for some years.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - All pleasant here so far; the only people here are Phil and Liza [Price], Hugh Bell's son [Hugh or John] and a friend of his who are 'quite nice boys', Kitty with her children, Marjorie and Patricia. There had been a shooting party, and he saw George and Janet for a minute before they left; thinks he will cycle over to see them soon. Glad he went by the early train from Ockley, as it meant he was in time to get a 'corner seat' on the Kings Cross train; his compartment was full throughout the journey, with 'quite nice people' including soldiers and later several merchant-service sailors; the corridors were 'rather crowded' so although he could have got to the restaurant car he was glad to have a packed lunch. Thinks Bessie had better go by train from Newcastle to avoid the 'long cold wait' he had in the Haymarket for a bus, reading Anatole France. She need only bring his small scarf. The school-children are 'very quiet'; the Bell boy plays piano in the evening '(not very brilliantly)' and Marjorie the oboe, but apparently Charles usually reads "Vanity Fair". Last night, however, he had to 'put on his general's uniform' and go to dine at Morpeth with 'a lot of Officers and the Duke of Gloucester - rather dull, C. says'. Hopes Bessie is also having the fine weather. Has not yet been round to see the woods and fallen trees. Will be very glad when Bessie comes on Tuesday.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Intended to send a small book of his "Translations from Leopardi", but then decided to wait until Julian and Ursula next come here, as they 'might easily lose it moving about'. Pity they cannot come now, when the flowers in the woods are at their best. All quite well here; the [Sturge] Moores will return in a month. Originally enclosing, on Bessie's request, a photograph of 'the street in Forest Green that [Julian] used to admire'. The Bluths and Tet Htoot were here at Easter, but otherwise they 'seem to see nobody'. Hopes that Tet Htoot will bring two Chinese friends to visit. A 'bad London raid last night'; hopes he and the Bluths are all right; Irene [Cooper Willis?] has fortunately been away. Has very few friends in London now besides these, Logan [Pearsall Smith] and Alys [Russell]. Virginia [Woolf]'s death 'a great blow'; she 'felt she was going out of her mind again and could not face it'. Is re-reading "To the Lighthouse", his favourite of her books; is writing something on her for the "Abinger Chronicle", but it is 'impossible to say anything adequate in the way of criticism'. Forgets whether Julian knew her. Is continuing to translate Montaigne and getting 'a little bored with it'; 'much more fun writing poetry, even if it is not worth much'. Hopes Julian has managed to see Ursula at Taunton, and that she is well again. Has heard from G.M.T. [his brother George] that Charles is giving Wallington to the National Trust now instead of leaving it in his will; he will continue to live there, and one of the family (probably his son George Lowthian) will stay there after his death; this will save on death-duties so there will be much more money for the children. Supposes this should not be discussed until it is announced. Hopes Bessie will go with Miss Simpkins for a few days to George and Janet next month; otherwise she never 'goes away from here, which is not good for her'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Glad that Bob approves about Wallington [being given at once to the National Trust by Charles: see 14/169]. Much looking forward to a visit from Bob: they can only put up two people at a time, so asks Bob to arrange it in good time beforehand: must be after 3 May. Janet is writing to Bessie about a visit from her and Miss Simkins.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Encloses a letter [14/169] which he is also sending a copy of to his children and to Aunt Annie [Philips]; expects Charles will tell Bob himself, but thought that since he himself was 'mainly responsible for it being done now and in this way' he would write. Feels that in 'the general ruin that is falling on us all', that handing Wallington over to the N[ationa] T[rust] now, thereby avoiding death duties, is the only way to save it

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Is also sending this letter to Aunt Annie [Philips], Humphry and Mary. Charles, largely on his wife and George's advice, has decided to hand over the Wallington house and estate to the National Trust at once, reserving a life interest for himself in its management; he requests the National Trust to allow Molly, or one of his children, to stay in the rent for a nominal amount after his death, and for the NT to vest the management of the estate in one of his children; the NT have agreed to declare their intention to do so, though they cannot put themselves under legal obligation without also incurring death duties; George states that the Trust will 'certainly fulfil its promise'. He himself approves of the arrangement, having as Executor of Charles's Will urged it on him since it avoids death duties. Did 'not take a decided view' on whether Wallington ought to be left to the Trust, but when he saw that Charles was determined to do so he became his Executor to 'make it easy as possible for all concerned'; the war and 'probable state of things' afterwards make him 'more favourably disposed towards the plan', as he is convinced that neither [Charles's son] George nor anyone else would be able to 'run the estate burdened with death duties without selling the treasures of Wallington or large parts of the estate or both', and so on 'from generation to generation'. A lengthy handwritten final paragraph acknowledges that the younger George has been 'hardly treated in not being more consulted and given a more definite place in the arrangement'; yet he previously 'showed no interest in Wallington' and his father is determined 'not to treat him as "an eldest son"; given that, the new arrangement is much the best for George.

Letter from Sir Charles Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Thanks Bob for the book [his "Collected Works"?], which they have just received; it is 'beautifully produced and printed'. Has already read Bob's 'beautiful poem on Goldie Dickinson' with 'great admiration and pleasure': few people have 'such satisfying tributes for their friends to rejoice in' as E. M. Forster's book on Dickinson and Bob's poem. Is going next week with [his son] Geoffrey, Edith [Bulmer] and 'an American whom Geoffrey has found' to the U.S.S.R.: they will spend June and July there. Hopes Bob will come to Wallington in August; 'some grouse disease' is threatened, but so far thinks it has been a 'good hatching season'.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

W[est] H[ackhurst]. - Very much liked the poem Trevelyan has written about Goldie [Dickinson]: Bessie has given him a copy to keep. He shares the sentiments about Goldie: he was not afraid of death, only distressed by the state of the world as he left it. Forster is glad he has gone, particularly that he did not live to see Japan attack China. Expects Trevelyan will send a copy to May and Hettie [Dickinson's sisters], to whom it will give great pleasure. Is lending his own copy to Florence Barger. Sends greetings to Trevelyan's brother [Sir Charles]; would like to visit him again, and wonders how his plantations coped with the summer. Has just returned from Dorset, and is to 'broadcast about T. E. Lawrence's cottage there.'

Letter from Cyril Bailey to R. C. Trevelyan

The King's Mound, Mansfield Road, Oxford. - Thanks Trevelyan for his 'kind and generous letter'; glad that his criticism [in a review of Trevelyan's translation of Lucretius for the TLS, see 21/43] did not seem 'unjust'. Was sure Trevelyan must have felt the 'disadvantage... of blank verse' far more than he himself did as a reader; agrees that it has compensations, and does not think there is really an alternative; discusses possibilities, particularly verse forms used by [Robert] Bridges; Bridge's hexameters 'irritated' Bailey. Asks Trevelyan to let him know if he ever comes to Oxford, to make sure of meeting; could almost always give him somewhere to sleep if needed. Both Trevelyan's brother's are 'such old friends' of Bailey's wife, and indeed of Bailey himself.

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