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Trevelyan, Sir Charles Philips (1870–1958), 3rd Baronet, politician
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Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter and her cake; this was very good, and he and Hicks (who is as old as Robert), had tea with Mr and Mrs Arnold. A boy who was at Wixenford who has just left Harrow, Walford (Hugh Selwyn or Arthur George Walford?), was also here; he was in Watson's house and says he knows Charlie. Robert hopes Charlie is getting on well. Archie has asked Robert to go to see him next holiday in Ireland, but this 'would hardly be possible'; asks his mother if he could go, as he would like to but knows it would 'be rather a business' going to Ireland and back. The weather is very fine today. There was no match last Saturday, as the 'Farnborough fellows' were unwell. It is the Eton match tomorrow, but there are 'only three or four Eton chaps'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Was very glad that Robert went to the funeral; there is an 'immense gap' since [Sir George's sister] Margaret's 'vitality, and power of interest made one forget how long she had been very ill'. Charles and Mary went to Rounton [Grange] this morning; Janet, George, and their babies [Mary and Theodore]. A huge search-party was out for 'old Thompson', the farmer-shepherd at Harwood, who was nearly blind and got lost on 'Friday week, the first of the hot days'; Charles got fifty 'navvies from the water works' to join in; Harwood was eventually found drowned in Fallowlees Loch. It would not have been right to shoot Harwood moor, and the game were scattered over the county by the searchers; Sir George went shooting for the first time yesterday and did well; will shoot Catcherside next Monday. Has bought the twelve volumes of the "Yellow Book" in the original covers; asks if he has had a bargain. Glad that the Water Lane is being done to Robert and Elizabeth's satisfaction.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Perfect recent weather; has done 'a fair lot of work' and thinks he is 'well started' on his new play about 'a man who comes back from the Crusades and finds his enemy in occupation of his castle'. [C.P] Scott, editor of the "Manchester Guardian", has asked him to send an account of the landslip disaster [at the Cappuccini hotel]; if Scott prints his letter he will show it her, as his 'first and perhaps... last attempt at journalism'. The accounts of the landslip in the papers are 'greatly exaggerated'; Bessie need not worry about him. Once read a review of [Kenneth Grahame's] "The Golden Age" by Swinburne, 'with more than his usual extravagance of praise'; was rather disappointed when he read some of it soon after. Fry's sister Isabel has written 'a somewhat similar book, but with no pretentions', which he thinks is worth 'twenty golden ages'; it is called "Unitiated" and he will get it for Bessie to read; Isabel Fry is very nice, and a little like Bessie in temperament. Will lend her [Stephen Philips'] "Paolo and Francesca"; does not think much of it. Is too lazy to copy out verses, as he promised. Agrees that it is wonderful to think of going out for dinner together; not that either of them do that much, but in moderation it is very good, and he has never dined out enough for the 'novelty of it to be spoilt' as it is for her uncle. Teases her about her dreams. Is sure with her uncle and Lord Reay's advice they will be able to arrange their marriage properly; they should have as few formalities as possible, and avoid being married again in England if they can; would like the date to be as soon as possible, in June, but she should decide. Notes that this is the last letter he will send dated 1899, and '1900 will look awfully odd'.

Very interested by her description of her childhood; Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is certainly ' not the sort of person to have understood [Bessie] at all'; he had something of the same difficulty with Charles, who however tried to be sympathetic and a good brother to him; Charles 'had a sterner and more orderly temperament' and Bob 'the more haphazard one'. George is 'a sort of cross' between the two, but with much more intellect than Charles. Encloses a letter from Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan]; knew she had taken a fancy to Bessie; 'her staccato style is admirably expressive. She does it in conversation often'. Had said in his letter that his parents might visit Sicily next winter and she might possibly see him with them and Bessie next year. Has nearly finished reading [Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant"; thinks it 'a most remarkable novel' though it does drag in places. Calls the muses her 'real rivals, my dear nine mistresses'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Looking forward to seeing Robert and Elizabeth at Wallington. Robert must be having a good time with [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson 'in such scenery and circumstances'. Glad about 'the Water-lane'. Charles and Mary will be at Cambo for a good part of their visit. Must read [Aristophanes's] "Thesmophoriazusae" again; remembers [Charles] Vaughan saying 'how much he liked the three female comedies'. Is entering Macaulay's marks in his favourite Cicero speeches in the Dolphin [edition]; has already done this for the Terence. Miss Richardson has again got 'three County Council scholarships... not bad for a school of 60 children'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Thanks his father for his letter [12/76], and the '[obituary] notice of the poor silent fogey [Sir Joseph Crosland]'. Remembers the fogeys, and the amusement they gave, very well, but not where they met them; has a 'vague recollection that it was at some English sea-side hotel, perhaps in Yorkshire', but it may well have been abroad. Expects Crosland 'felt very much out of place in the House, and may have been glad to be turned out'; he 'seemed a kindly old fogey', and Robert can 'well believe that, in the stately phrase of the Times, he was "generous to a degree"'.

His father's letter to Paul [Hubrecht] has just arrived and will be forwarded; thinks they [Paul and his brother Jan] both much enjoyed their visit to Wallington; Jan was here for two days, and they went over to the site on Sunday with him. The foundations [of Robert and Elizabeth's house] are about finished, and as far as can be judged the work seems very good; they will meet the architect there soon to make some plans about the garden, which will not be big but require thought as it is 'all on a slope'.

Has left [Turgenev's] Dmitri Roudine at Wallington; asks if it could be sent back to the library once his father has done with it. He and Bessie are both very well, and much enjoyed their time at Wallington 'in spite of the doubtful weather'; it was an 'additional pleasure to see Charles and Molly so happily settled'. Hopes his father is still getting on as well with his book; liked reading the two sections he gave him, and 'thought them everything that could be desired'. Bessie thanks both Robert's parents for their letters, and will 'write directly'; they both send their love.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Was judging at the Exhibition on Saturday; 'Sunday we went to Church!'; Sir George read his chapter to her for two hours on Monday. Elinor Middleton, Kenneth Swan and 'M. Burnett' have been staying with them; tomorrow it is the tenants' party. Sir George was very pleased to have Julian's photograph; intends to come to see him in the autumn. Theo and Humphry have had measles and are recovering; Mary shows no sign of it; the children's visit may be delayed a little but George comes on the 31st. The [Henry Yates] Thompsons visit soon. Pleased to have good news of Julian; would like to see a photograph of him in the donkey cart. Hopes they are enjoying Mr [Donald] Tovey's visit and that he is better.

Continues the letter after having been interrupted by Mary and her guests Mr and Mrs Runciman, then 'the children with the poney [sic]'; Pauline is 'beginning to ride nicely'. Has read Rosalind Murray's "The Leading Note", which is 'nice and simple, but a girl of that age does not know enough to write a novel'. Hopes Robert is enjoying having 'Ariadne clothed and adorned [by Tovey's composition of the score of "The bride of Dionysus"].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Glad that the Hardys [G. H. Hardy and his sister?] have arrived. Caroline mentioned La Croiz to the Arthur Elliots, as they are going to the Riviera at Easter, but could not tell them whether there were 'good drives' which is important as he is 'very lame'. The last days before [George and Janet's] wedding are most exciting; the Wards are 'wonderfully energetic' and their arrangements go well. Went to see the presents yesterday; there seemed to be almost as many as C[harles] and M[ary] had, though there were fewer presentations and large things. Janet had 'some very nice offerings from her girls, & many servants & poor people'; lots of books, silver, cheques; Janet's trousseau was 'nice and useful'. Hopes the weather at Oxford will be good. Caroline, Sir George and Booa [Mary Prestwich] are going down before the special train to be at the registry. She and Sir George have not been well; thinks Sir George was doing too much, so he is resting. The Duke of Cambridge has died, so there will be no question of going to Court tomorrow; is glad as it 'seemed so inappropriate'. Has a note from [Bramine Hubrecht at] Taormina saying that the things have been sent; hopes they will arrive soon. Hopes the concert went well. The H[enry] Y[ates] T[hompson]s 'would be sorry not to be able to stop'. They [the Liberals] have won another [by] election, and 'the Gov[ernment] are in a poor way'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Has been unwell and 'laid up', but is now better. [George and Janet's] wedding seems very near; wishes Elizabeth and Robert could be there. George is busy going over his book ["England Under The Stuarts"] with [Charles] Oman, and she thinks all but the last chapter will be finished before the wedding; he is taking a few days in the country from tomorrow. Charlie was 'triumphantly returned' for the North[umberland] C[ounty] C[ouncil] but looks tired; worries about him taking on more work. Mary looks very happy. Glad Elizabeth saw her 'pretty friend [sic] Mrs Salamon' [Jeanne Salamonson Asser] and had some music; Robert also writes that the Hardys [G. H. Hardy and his sister?] have come. Hopes Elizabeth gets to visit the Netherlands before returning to England. Looking forward to getting the things from Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht]; hopes there is a good reason for their sale at Taormina. Elizabeth must come to stay at Welcombe while Robert goes to his friends [G E Moore's reading party] if they are back in England by then. Sir George is reading newspapers each morning at the British Museum, which 'he hates doing'; he will finish this week. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is 'very beaming over George', and all [wedding] arrangements are going well.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi. - Has received the "Descent of the Primates" from Professor [Ambrosius] Hubrecht and found it very interesting; a long time since he read Darwin and 'tried to imagine [his] hairy, long-eard, tail-bearing, tree-haunting ancestors' and the paper has 'quite revived' the old fascination; never thought the hedgehog was 'so comparatively near a relation'. He and [Roger] Fry used to have one in London to kill black-beetles, which they called Hochi-Weechi, the Romany for hedgehog. Obviously Hubrecht's work is 'of great importance and value'. Had forgotten to send him the address of his own spectacle shop, and will do so when he writes to thank him. Had also forgotten to tell Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan; about their engagement]; will write at once. Hopes Gredel [Guije] gets through [her exam].

Continues the letter next day. Has got on 'fairly well' with his play recently; the sirocco is blowing today so he cannot do much except copy out what he has done so far, translate some Sophocles, and deal with correspondence. Old Palumbo is about the same; his wife does not want Bob to go unless absolutely necessary. Has not yet had a letter, or rings from which to choose one for her, from the Frys, but has written to them. Has had a 'charming' letter from Tommy Phelps [17/156], whom he calls 'almost my eldest friend' and had jokingly warned him against Dutch ladies when he would not tell him why he was going to Holland again so soon; it was also Phelps who originated the Vondel / fondle pun. Also returns C [Charles Trevelyan?]'s letter. Copies out some lines from "Troilus and Cressida", which he discusses briefly.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Thanks Elizabeth for her long letter: 'the old ladies' must have been very funny. Hopes she found Julian well. Margaret and Reggie Smith are staying on their way north; he seems sensible and is going to travel to India and so on before 'settling down at the Bank'; Margaret 'has wonderful masses of red hair' which she wears in a strange style [a sketch illustrates this]. Hopes the weather will be good so they can have a picnic; Elizabeth and Robert were not fortunate with the weather for their visit, she loved seeing them and is glad they enjoyed themselves. Likes Robert's poem very much and so does Charlie. [Charles and Mary's] children came on Sunday, with 'little Steven Runciman'; Nora [Trevelyan?] has arrived 'so the Cambo "season" has commenced'. Hears there will be about six hundred people on the 'Liberal Excursion'; hopes they have good weather. Pantlin has gone with her cousin to the seaside. Mrs [Nora] Sidgwick is visiting next week. Hopes Mr Enticknap's journey home went well; she sees Gussie at work [in the gardens] 'looking busy and happy'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Otto Trevelyan

Thanks his father for his letter. Thinks G[eorge] is happy and 'quite at home' [at Wixenford]. Mr Arnold has told Robert to ask Charlie how much he will have to know when he goes to Harrow; wrote to him a few days ago. Likes the Virgil and Euripides' "Iphigenia" very much. Hears that Welldon has been chosen for Harrow [as headmaster]; hopes he is a 'nice man'. He and George are getting on well in their work. Asks his father to thank his mother for her letter and the umbrella. Tomlin 'took Up[p]er Shell'. [Nugent] Hicks is going to Harrow next term. Has written to Grandpapa T[revelyan]. Sends love to all, 'Spider included'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Trin[ity] Coll[ege], Cambridge. - Thanks Elizabeth for her letter; [he and Charles] were lucky as 'it is so difficult to get wedding presents which are not bores'. Wishes she had been at Welcombe last week; the weather was perfect, the 'primroses and daffodils and violets were all out', it was 'the best week of the English year, and at its very best in Warwickshire'. Wonders if she will like Northumberland; hopes she will have a chance to see this summer. Is looking forward to coming to Holland for the wedding very much.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Hears that snow has fallen on some parts of the Riviera, and wonders whether Elizabeth and Robert have seen any. [George and Janet's] wedding is near, and the arrangements all seem to be made; she, Sir George, Charles, M[ary] and Booa [Mary Prestwich] are going early and will be at the Registry Office; the others are coming by a special train and will go to the college [Somerville?]; some people think the arrangements 'very queer' and others 'are enthusiastic about the novel kind of marriage'. She herself thinks it will be nice, and wishes Elizabeth and Robert could be there. George and Janet are going to a farm house in Surrey where the Wards used to spend their summers for ten days, and will then go abroad after having seen the furniture put into their house. Wonders when Elizabeth and Robert will return and whether the 'road [to their new house] business will be settled'; supposes they will want the building to begin as soon as possible. The clergy made 'most violent efforts against the progressives' in the London County Council election, but made little difference to the numbers. No one is sure whether there will be a general election soon; the government is 'absolutely discredited' and many of their own party are talking 'openly against them'. Emily Hobhouse has been to tea with her, having just returned from the Transvaal; Caroline is glad that she is to have a testimonial given her. They are going to Welcombe for about a fortnight on 29 March, then will return to London before they go abroad at Whitsun. Sir George is well, and 'reading busily for Vol IV [of "The American Revolution"].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S. W. [London] :- Thanks his parents for their last letter; they are in town again, as Bessie needs to go to rehearsals for her last concert [with Arnold Dolmetsch] on Wednesday. The concerts have 'gone of very well so far', though Robert was unable to attend the last one since it was on the 'evening of the [Apostles?] dinner'. Henry Jackson made a 'very nice speech', as did 'Judge Lushington, who was the oldest of those present'.

They lunched at North Street last week and thought Charles and Molly looked 'very happy, and their house very nice'. They went to Harrow last Saturday to see the [F. E.?] Marshalls and had a 'very pleasant time there'; they went to the 'Speech room' in the evening 'to hear the final reading for the reading prize' which was 'very amusing', though they 'did not think the standard very high'. 'Young [James?] Butler, who must be about 15 or 16, was promising' though did not yet have 'sufficient command of his voice'; he is said to be 'quite a good scholar, and looks a nice boy'. The winner read Joy for his chosen piece. The Lower School had to read the 'description of William at the Boyne [from Macaulay]; but they did not make much of it'. Also saw Sir Arthur Hort, who is 'mainly responsible for [the] first fifteen boys'; believes he is 'doing very well', and there have certainly been more scholarships awarded to Harrow boys over the last few years. Very sad they have 'thought it necessary to dry up the Grove pond'; supposes it was a 'great nuisance and expense'.

They hope to see Sir George before long, and also that Caroline will come to Dorking around the end of the month.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi. - Filthy weather, as it has generally been since he arrived; has sent off his 'interminable commentary' on [Thomas Sturge Moore's] "Danaë", and has been reading Byron's play "Cain"; finds it 'surprisingly fine', though there are great faults, as in all of Byron; does not agree with Goethe's claim that Byron 'is a child the moment he begins to think'. Always pleased when he finds good things in Byron, as he is much criticised nowadays; people do not really read him, or 'only his inferior early things, e.g. Childe Harold'. Teases Bessie, pretending that 'an unconscionable young lady' keeps 'tormenting him with a stupid school-girl correspondence' and there is no telling where her reading of Plato may lead her. Is sorry that Bessie is having so bad a time with the dentist; best to go through with it in the end. Dined at Mrs Reid's last night, hearing 'local tales about brigands etc' and drinking good wine. They have 'some wonderful cats, the most beautiful [he] has ever seen'; would like to get 'one of the family some day'. Delighted to hear about [the birth of Bessie's niece] Amanda Röntgen; Bessie's aunt told him first, sends thanks for her letter. Copies out poems by Vaughn [sic: Henry Vaughan, "The Retreat"], and Blake ["Infant Joy"]. Will finish this letter and 'per-haps, as Grandmont says' send it by the early post. Is glad to have Bessie's photograph but wants the bigger one when she gets them.

Finishes the letter next day. Bad weather again; is not in good spirits as his host Palumbo is dangerously ill; Palumbo has suffered from the same paralysis before and may recover; he is a 'very good fellow' and Bob will be sorry if he dies; pities his wife and daughter. Has just read the news of the great British losses at Ladysmith; does not know whether this means the town has fallen, but it looks as though Methuen was not strong enough to relieve it; if Redvers Buller does not do better than Methuen, expects Ladysmith will fall in a few weeks and would wish that if it would lead to the reopening of peace negotiations, but this seems unlikely. Says Bessie 'deserve[s] a whipping' for interpreting his jealousy of the lovers in his carriage as a desire to hug his female fellow-travellers. Is very glad she likes the "Symposium" so much; discusses it briefly and suggests other dialogues by Plato she could read. Copies out Blake's "Infant Sorrow" and "Cradle Song". [His brother] Charlie's letter was very nice; is sure she will like him, and he 'evidently means to like [her]'. Reminds her that the new century does not begin until 1901. Glad her practising is going well.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for 40 Ennismore Gardens, SW]. Is very glad to hear that Charlie is better. They are going to play a march against Farnborough tomorrow. It was 'very hot a few days ago', but is less so now. Sends his love to Charlie and their father. The term is nearly over now, with only two more weekend to go. The 'whole school is mad on stamps now'; thinks 'more than half the boys collect'. 'It was a very nice letter of the gamekeeper'. Adds a postscript to say G[eorgie] was unwell a few days ago, but has now recovered; thinks he had a headache.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Nice to hear of 'sunshine and flowers' from Elizabeth, as it is still very wintry here. Is glad to spend some time in London, see friends, and feel 'in the centre of things'. Charles, M[ary], G[eorge] and J[anet] often visit, and are all cheerful. George and Janet's wedding is fixed for 19 March; the Wards have taken a house at Oxford for a week for it, it is 'an original business' and she hopes it will satisfy everyone 'except the orthodox!'. Has paid Elizabeth's subscription to the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club, and seen the Secretary, who says its future will be 'settled next month' but she thinks it will carried on. Interested by Elizabeth's account of Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht]'s 'entertainment', and thinks it will be charming as 'the Italians have an artistic strain through all their vulgarity'. Does not think pipes [?] and jam will be useful [for bazaars], but would be glad if Madame Grandmont could send her five pounds worth of Taormina [embroidery and lace] work. Glad to hear the Frys are happier; has been very sorry for Roger Fry. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert will get the question of the road [to the house they are having built at Leith Hill] settled soon; annoying to have lost the winter for building. Wonders what Bob is writing; hopes their translation work is progressing. Politics very interesting, but she thinks the Government will hold on. Has no sympathy for either side in the [Russo-Japanese] War, and wishes 'they could both be beaten'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Thanks Bob for his letter, which 'did [George's] heart good'. Takes a 'more serious view of England's positive danger [emphasised]" than Charles and perhaps Bob, and so will go further than Bob may like in 'arguing the greater justice of our cause than Germany's to the Americans [on a lecture tour in the States], whose friendship is so essential'. Knows that Bob will not agree with everything he will say or do, but it means a lot that he 'so generously recognize[s]' that George is 'acting to the best of [his] conscience and not from funk'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Found C[harles] and M[ary] settled at North Street, a 'bright little house' which they have made pretty, furnishing it 'economically' and suitably for a small space; their [wedding] presents looked nice, and they have an excellent book collection. Mary looks very contented, and 'Charlie's hair is curling as it has not done for a long time!'. One of the two small drawing-rooms has two pianos in; if they play them together their neighbours will think it noisy, but 'they are humble folk, & the children who swam in Westminster will come & listen in the street!'. George looks as if he needs a holiday; Caroline is glad the wedding is not far away, on 17 March. Janet looks very happy and says she is busy with her trousseau. Dorothy has returned and said to be 'much better for her journey'. Saw the H[enry] Y[ates] Thompsons yesterday; they start for Sicily tomorrow; Caroline will ask Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] to let them see her garden. Asks whether Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht] would let them call on her; thinks she would like Dolly. Harry is telling people that Caroline and Sir George like their new daughters-in-law, but will not say 'either of them come up to Elizabeth in character or walking!'. Glad he has the right impression, though of course they will all have a 'separate place' in their hearts; Mary is good, sensible, and suits Charles, but 'needs a little polishing'.

If there are things at La Croix which would be suitable for a bazaar at Stratford, asks if Elizabeth could buy her two pounds worth; she can send them by post if she likes. Going today to see if they can find out about Aunt Margaret [Holland]'s health; fears it is her 'old trouble, clots'. Meta [Smith?] has reached Egypt; is said to be better. Very glad life at La Croix suits Robert's work. Caroline has found a cabinet at Stratford which she thinks will suit their new house; asks whether the work on that has begun yet.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

It 'snowed hard last Sunday, and no one could go out'. Has had a stiff neck and cold, but neither have been very bad. Sorry to hear Charlie has a bad cold and hopes he gets better soon; asks Caroline to thank him for his letter. They had a 'grand set out last Tuesday', which they had as half holiday instead of Wednesday. Mrs Lyell and Mrs Stirling came, and they had charades; will tell his mother 'all about it' in the holidays.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - They have just arrived in London, in pouring rain. Glad Elizabeth and Robert continue to like La Croix [-Valmer?]. Expects it must be difficult to give a sense of period language in their translation work; sure that between them they will do well. The gathering at Welcombe was pleasant: Henry James, 'as delightful as ever', Miss [Lily] Noble who 'always brings an atmosphere of culture and friendliness', Sir Alfred Lyall, 'the agreeable man of the world'; Mrs [Alice Stopford] Green, earnest and serious, who 'occasionally treads on all our toes!'. There was lots of talk, and they managed some walks [despite the weather]. Yesterday and this morning she watched some flowering shrubs being planted in the garden at Welcombe; hopes they will flourish. Going to North Street [Charles and Mary's house] tomorrow, and will write and tell Elizabeth about it. Has had a letter from Mad[am]e Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan], who is pleased with the photographs Caroline sent her

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for 40 Ennismore Gardens, SW]. Is sorry C[harlie] 'is ill again and cannot go back [to Harrow] tomorrow'; hopes he will be able to soon. The Farnborough match is tomorrow, and a home game. There is no more ice left; it was 'beautifully hot today, nearly as hot as summer'. Mr A[rnold] is better and teaching his divinity class again. Georgie's chilblains are 'almost well now', and probably his cold since he went out today; he and Robert are 'getting on very well'. Thompson, Mr Arnold, and Mr Wilkins went into 'the lavatory yesterday evening' during tea 'and what followed [a whipping?] I leave to you to imagine'; Robert thinks Thompson may have 'told a lie, but there are various accounts'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - He and Caroline agree that it is 'poor work' seeing North Italian cities at the beginning of January; the contrast between the North and South of the Apennines is very great: even so early the Val d'Arno was lovely. Expects the 'quiet life' at Welcombe will soon 'set him up'. Much interested by Robert and Bessie's accounts of the New Year festivities at Aulla [Fortezza della Brunella, home of the Waterfields]; could not find an account of the siege in Gregorovius as he ends in 1527, so must look it up in Sismondi. Parliament has been dissolved [for the general election]; they have a 'very energetic candidate' [Thomas Kincaid-Smith]' at Stratford who 'has canvassed the whole division in a motor' and is 'learning some politics as he goes along'. There are plenty of 'humorous incidents all about', including at Elland [Charles's constituency]. Balfour 'kicked off at the beginning of a football match [at Manchester United] and Sir James Fergusson in the middle' and both were 'hooted'; comments on 'such a function' being given to 'a London swell, born in 1832, who was wounded at Inkerman! [Fergusson]'. Is finishing Bergk [his edition of the Greek lyric poets] with the help of Weir Smith [Herbert Weir Smyth]; an excellent book recommended to him by 'dear Jebb'. Sends love to Bessie; the [new] piano has come and 'looks beautiful'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for 40 Ennismore Gardens, SW]. Thanks his parents for their letters. Mr Arnold is 'getting much better'; Robert has been working with him for the last week on his Greek and Latin Prose. Robert's mother asked in her last letter when she could next visit; asks his father to tell her that Mr Arnold will not be well enough for about a fortnight, and Robert will let her know when he has recovered sufficiently. G[eorge] is 'getting on very well'. Has just finished reading a book called The Carved Cartoon [by Austin Clare] about the plague and fire of London. Is glad Charlie has returned to school and is all right.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Palace Hotel, Rome. - Glad that Robert and Elizabeth are enjoying the castle [at Aulla, home of Aubrey and Lina Waterfield]. He and Caroline have had some pleasant expeditions: to Ostia in 'the American Ambassador's motor, a fearful joy'; to Castel Gandolfo and Nemi; and to Grottaferrata, where they saw an exhibition of medieval ecclesiastical objects in the old monastery and he had a fine walk around the castle into the valley of the Almo. But on an expedition to the Villa Livia, he fell and hurt himself, and brought on the worst attack of rheumatism he has ever had; this is his fourth day in bed. They are disappointed about Charles being left out, but he is 'behaving very well'. Was moved by the death of [Arthur] Humphreys-Owen, and even more by that of [Sir Richard] Jebb, about whom his feelings were 'rather ideal' since first seeing him as 'an elegant, rather black-looking, rather too carefully dressed freshman in [Herbert] Malkin's rooms'; Malkin reminded him this year that when he asked Sir George to meet Jebb, he cried '"What! Jebb? Oh, joy!!'. They intend to leave Rome on 28 December and to be in England by 4 January, but he must be well to travel.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Robert gave lots of news about Elizabeth in his letter; interesting that she is translating again; asks whether she finished the novel she was working on last year. There must be a great deal of Dutch literature 'unknown to other nations' as the language is rarely learnt. The poem must be curious; asks whether the language differs much from modern Dutch; it dates from a 'great time in the countrie's [sic] history]. She and Sir George have been seeing neighbours and going into town she has been to London several times. There are great floods: 'the Avon is out all down the valley'. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert will continue to like La Croix [-Valmer?]. They are feeling happier about politics; Chamberlain is 'not gaining ground' and the Government 'make a most wretched show' in the House of Commons. They are expecting H[enry] James, Miss [Lily] Noble, Mrs [Alice Stopford] Green and Sir [Alfred] Lyall for a couple of days tomorrow, and go up to London on the 12th. North Street [Charles and Mary's London house] has been 'started', with 'no drawbacks', and she looks forward to seeing it; Cheyne Gardens [George and Janet's London house] is also progressing, and Janet is very pleased with it. The "Independent [Review]" for February is good, and much attention is being paid to it; hopes it is 'establishing itself'. Has subscribed again to Rolandi [the foreign language bookseller and library], so asks Elizabeth to let her know if she hears of any good French books. Notes that 'the modern world seems to find it necessary to have a millionaire for hero!'. Asks if Elizabeth has anyone to accompany her violin playing. Aunt Margaret [Holland] is still too ill for visitors, and does not even have letters read to her.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for the Harrow Philathletic Club; 'Trinity' added in pencil]: - People are now beginning to go down: Cambridge is 'becoming much quieter', and he is 'rather glad to be able to stay up until next Friday'. Will come home then, and go to Tunbridge Wells on the following day [to see his aunt Anna Maria Philips, and Sophie Wicksteed]. Asks when they are likely to go abroad: he supposes 'as soon as Georgie comes home'. There are no more lectures, but he will go to Lendrum [a coach] once more; thinks he will continue to see him next term, as he 'learn[s] a great deal from him'.

Several people are coming up from Harrow tomorrow 'to pass [their] matriculation', including Tommy [Macaulay] Booth and [J.W.?] Sandilands. Robert is going to pay all his bills this term, including his kitchen bill; will then be able to 'see more or less what the term has cost'. Thinks Charlie is well, though has 'not seen him much for a day or two'. He himself has had a cold, but it is 'almost gone now'.

Hopes 'all is going well in politics', but they [the Liberals] 'can afford to have a few reverses after London'. The Magpie and Stump debating society dinner 'was a great success after the election [of the new President]': Verrall and Ja[c]kson were there, and it 'was not too rowdy'. Lord Herschell's meeting was also a success, though Robert was 'a little disappointed in his speech'. Hopes his parents are well.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Decorated with transfer sticker of a sailing ship. Hopes his family are well and happy, as he is. There is a 'rage for Stilographic and Antistilographic [sic] pens'. Hugo has not been expelled. Will be 'very glad' to have a few photographs. Is 'top for the week in Latin'. The exams are this week. Asks his mother to send some stamps, envelopes and note paper. Mrs Arnold gives lectures on botany. Has begun to collect stamps; Smith has given him 21, Browning 7, and Smith is going to give him some more; knows she does not mind. Glad to hear Grandpapa [Trevelyan?] Is better. Robert and Charlie have been writing postcards to each other ‘in the secret way’. Adds a postscript hoping that Sophy is all right.

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