Showing 10 results

Archival description
Temple, Henry John (1784–1865), 3rd Viscount Palmerston, Prime Minister
Print preview View:

1 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

William Whewell letters and printed material received

A collection of some of the printed material and letters received by Whewell between 1819 to 1833, of which the materials relating to the Cambridge elections of 1829 and 1830 form a part.

Whewell, William (1794-1866), college head and writer on the history and philosophy of science

Letter from Edward M. Young to Henry Sidgwick

Appreciates Sidgwick's long letter. Reports that he has been well informed of Trinity, and more particularly, of 'Apostolic' news. Refers to his present illness. Asks for Sidgwick's advice in relation to whether or not he should take the Tripos examination or to stake his credit on some future Fellowship Exam. Asks whether he should study Pindar, Martial, Propertius and others. States that if he has any time it must be devoted partly to history and partly to '[Gk] Comp'. Asks if it is 'not fearful to forget the Greek for the simplest words, and to feel as well able to compose an air as an Iambic'. Reports that to him were sent three copies of Horace [at the University of Athens by G. O. Trevelyan?] which he discusses. Claims that '[Burnand] would have written a more telling piece for the stage, and Trevelyan should have produced something more worthy of his pen for the general public', but says that it nevertheless gave him an hour's laughter. Expresses regret that he missed 'the Professor's [Rhesio]', and asks if he was Platonical or ironical [W. H. Thompson, Regius Professor of Greek?]. Refers to a report in 'the Standard' about M. Milnes' attempt to canvass for Lord Palmerston in Cambridge within a few hours of the Chancellor's death [Prince Albert, Chancellor of Cambridge University until his death]. Expresses his contentment that Sidgwick [and others] 'have thrown the mantle upon [John?] Stanning', and supposes that the Duke of Devonshire 'is pretty safe of the Chancellorship'. Presumes that [Oscar?] Browning 'must have come down heavy upon [Sidgwick and others]...with his loyalty, during the last few days.' Refers to 'the great American debate', and is glad that the Arbitration [ ] will now be squashed. Refers to Miller's arguments, which he claims he could not have endured any more than Sidgwick. Tells him to remind Cowell, if he is still at Cambridge, that he promised to write to him.

Young, Edward Mallet (1839-1900) Head Master of Sherborne School

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW is surprised that he has not heard from RJ: 'I hope someday to have an opportunity of convincing you that I have ten times as much reason to be angry and weary and dissatisfied with my life as you have '. WW gives an account of the progress of Attree [William W. Atree - RJ's nephew] at Trinity. WW is sorry that RJ has 'promised not to come and vote for Lord Palmerston. I shall think the worst of the University if he is turned out upon that eternal no Popery cry which I do not think impossible. I cannot however persuade myself to care very much about the matter and am almost sick of hearing of that or any other subject of politics. Principally I believe because I can find no general principles at all to my liking and therefore cannot have the pleasure of applying them. If I could get rid of my tiresome occupations here and find time for some glimpses into your world of moral speculations I should at least have the pleasure of theorizing'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW will be glad to propose RJ's queries to Sir John Malcolm. He wishes RJ would let WW give Lord Palmerston's Committee 'at least one of your works. I do not think it will be a disagreeable business for the university to turn him out upon that senseless obstinacy of feeling against the Catholics; and to turn him out for a man like Copley [John S. Copley - Lord Lyndhurst] whose talents are too much entangled with a character of doubtful honesty to make him a respectable member'.

Copy letter from Francis Galton to J. G. Frazer

42 Rutland Gate, S.W. Dated October 18, 1902 - Answering Frazer's letter inquiring about the fear of death, suggests that Meadows Taylor had a phrase about the fear of death being a European maladay; recollects Lord Palmerston stating that Chinese men would offer themselves for execution if their funeral rites were paid for and a good dinner offered; cites 'Julius Caesar'; is heading to Rome and Sicily in November.

Letter from Francis Galton to J. G. Frazer

42 Rutland Gate, S.W. - Answers Frazer's letter inquiring about the fear of death, suggests that Meadows Taylor had a phrase about the fear of death being a European maladay; recollects Lord Palmerston stating that Chinese men would offer themselves for execution if their funeral rites were paid for and a good dinner offered; cites 'Julius Caesar'; is heading to Rome and Sicily in November.