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Trevelyan, Caroline (c 1847-1928) wife of Sir George Otto Trevelyan, 2nd Baronet
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Letter from Evelyn Spence Weiss to R. C. Trevelyan

73 Longton Avenue, Sydenham, SE26. - She and her husband thank Trevelyan 'most warmly' for another volume "From the Shiffolds", which they greatly value; has 'read & reread' the others. Was just about to write to Mrs Trevelyan when the book came; much appreciates how 'beautifully printed' it is, given her bad eyesight. Will include a letter for Mrs Trevelyan with their 'little news'. She is aging and her memory is certainly getting worse, though she recalls things from the 'far past' such as going for a walk with Trevelyan and her sister while their mothers talked. She tore her 'poor summer frock.. nearly from waist to hem' when they climbed a fence with barbed wire, and she remembers Lady Trevelyan mending it 'in the lovely Wallington hall'. Seems a 'far cry' from then to her golden wedding anniversary, which she and her husband celebrated in March; 'what a new world, not alas "brave new world"' it is now. Adds a postscript saying that her husband's arm 'made a perfect recovery': the surgeons said it was '"like a young man's"'.

Letter from Evelyn Spence Weiss to R. C. Trevelyan

73 Longton Avenue, Sydenham, SE26. - They are delighted to have Trevelyan's "From the Shiffolds"; Ernest [her husband] has not been well, so has not yet enjoyed it, but is looking forward to doing so. The poems give her 'nostalgia... yet happiness too'. Was interested in Trevelyan's poem "The Dandelion", since the flower is 'so beautiful & rarely celebrated by poets'. Long ago her mother, a 'friend and great admirer' of Trevelyan's mother, went to Coniston and visited the last surviving [Susanna] of the four Miss Beevers, Ruskin's friends. Expects Trevelyan knows the sisters each had 'their own terrace in their lovely garden', where they each grew their favourite flowers. Miss Beever asked her mother whether she knew [James Russell] Lowell's poem "To The Dandelion", which was the only one she had encountered before Trevelyan's. Thanks and good wishes from them both to both Trevelyans.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

Robin Ghyll, Langdale, Ambleside. - As he and Janet have 'hoped and expected' for a while, Mary has got engaged to John Moorman, who came to Hallington for a week in August; they met in June, at the Cornfords' musical parties in Cambridge. He left Cambridge this year, having stayed after his degree to train as a clergyman, and is now a curate in Leeds; he studied under [George Gordon] Coulton, who 'thinks highly of him'. He is 'liberal-minded', and George has discussed religion and history with him 'with much agreement and no feeling of barrier'. Moorman is also a 'fine walker' and is 'small but wiry'; his father was Professor of English at Leeds, and his mother is 'much respected in academic circles', and matron of a University hall in Leeds; their closest family friend is [Arthur] Grant, recently retired from the History Professorship there, a 'first-rate man'. Moorman's 'most intimate older and younger friends are Bishop Wyld [sic: Herbert Wild, Bishop of Newcastle], who conducted George and Bob's parents' funerals, and his son [John?]; in fact his 'whole entourage and atmosphere is about equally academic and clerical'. Thinks he will suit Mary very well, though 'not many people would', so he and Janet are much pleased.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

7A Stanley Gardens. - Has left the Trevelyan's umbrella with the rug at Horbury Crescent; was surprised to find Miss [Marie?] Busch there. Liked what he saw of the theological students to whom he gave an address yesterday, though he is unsure whether these talks do much good. Pleased to see Bessie and Julian: hopes to see Julian in Cambridge. Asks about [Bob Trevelyan's mother's] will. Ends by quoting a 'maxim of Goethe' in German.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Thanks Eddie for his letter on his mother's death; she had 'become very feeble, both in body and mind, of late years', so her death was 'not unexpected'; Bob's father still 'feels it a great deal, though he takes it stoically'; Bob fears he is 'becoming very weak physically', though still has much vitality. It was a very happy marriage, of almost sixty years; she was 'a very affectionate mother to us all, and to Bessie too'. Glad that Eddie knew her 'in old days', just as he has 'so pleasant a recollection' of Eddie's mother.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

I Tatti, Ponte a Mensola (sotto Settignano). - Has read in the papers of Trevelyan's mother's death; knows it was expected but imagines his sorrow and sends sympathies. Expresses an 'egoistical hope' that Trevelyan's travel plans, even if postponed, are not cancelled altogether. Has just returned from Turin, where 'Death has played terrible tricks' with some of his cousins recently, not at a great age. Sets out his immediate plans; he can come at any time from Rome to put Trevelyan up at Cortona.

Autobiographical sketch by R. C. Trevelyan

Describes: his studies at Cambridge; brief time as a pupil in the chambers of T. E. Scrutton, which would have been a 'great privilege and opportunity' if he had only had 'any talent for the law'; a long holiday at Corpo di Cava in southern Italy to recover from influenza, where he began to write a 'long, rambling... romantic modern novel' on the theme of incest, inspired by Ibsen's "Little Eyolf; outdoor composition; his turn to writing poetry, in which he was encouraged by Roger Fry.

Pencil notes at the back of the book sketching out further topics for the autobiographical account, such as [Thomas] Sturge Moore; 'Taormina - Bessie - Mrs [Florence] Cacciola - Holland'; writing the libretto [for the "Bride of Dionysus"] for Donald Tovey; his translation of Aeschylus; Welcombe [his inheritance of the house from his mother?]; at the bottom of this page, the other way up, there is the beginning of an account of a gentleman living 'not long since, in one of the northern counties of England'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Headed 'Private'. Encloses a letter from Aunt Annie [Philips: 13/229]. Suggests that if Bob does decide to write to their father as she suggests, he should begin by saying that he does not know whether their mother is 'really likely to leave us quite soon', but understands from Aunt Annie that this is a possibility, and that he is anxious that in that event their father should not hurry to leave Welcombe. Also thinks that Bob should say he and Bessie have 'no thought of moving into Welcombe' themselves.

Letter from Anna Maria Philips to George Macaulay Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Gives a detailed account of [Caroline Trevelyan's] condition, which is 'much the same as on 21st'; thinks she will keep going 'a week or two longer' and will write on Wednesday. Sir George sits with her '3 or 4 times daily holding her hand'. Suggests that Robert should write to tell Sir George that it would be better for him to stay on at Welcombe for some time: she has just seen a letter from Mrs Watson saying the house at Wallington will be made ready quickly at short notice as requested, which must be in response to a letter from Sir George. She believes it is 'not safe' for him to go North until May or June, but she must get home at the end of February, for two weeks if possible. Glad she and George talked in November; feels they 'understand each other'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes Robert's weather is better than the 'dreary' conditions they are 'surviving'; they are very comfortable indoors. Aunt Annie [Philips] has 'unearthed a new novelist', [Ralph Hale] Mottram, who was a bank clerk until he went to the Front in France; discusses the novels he has read of his. Caroline sends her love.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Is sorry for 'this upset' [probably the last illness of either or both of Robert Trevelyan's parents]. Advice on Julian's application to Cambridge. Morgan [Forster] is no better: he is going to town to have an X-ray today. Enjoyed his afternoon with the Trevelyans; thinks [Gordon?] Bottomley 'most delightful'. Presumes she has told Allen not to call for him tomorrow.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Amused by Robert's letter about Julian; their family could always 'read aloud, write poetry, and declaim, but none of them were actors'; Julian has the technical, and pictorial, and manual power in which we were utterly destitute'; means the Macaulay and Trevelyan families, as Caroline is a 'beautiful artist'. Has given Robert's love to her and Aunt Anna.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Has instructed Drummond [his banker] to pay eighty pounds into Robert's account. Sends love to Elizabeth. Has been 'terribly busy for [his] age and strength' for a while with household and estate business. Caroline was taken ill a fortnight ago on Wednesday, and is only just starting to be carried downstairs for a few hours in the day. Aunt Annie [Philips] has given up all her engagements to come and nurse her.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Thanks Robert for the affection in his letter; he is very busy at the moment, and has little strength to do what needs to be done, but he and Caroline 'greatly felt' all Robert said about himself and Elizabeth. Caroline is liable to sudden, unpredictable attacks. Thanks for the news about Mary Caroline.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Has not yet transferred the second fifty pounds to Bob's account since the lawyers have not yet 'transferred the personalty' [personal property of Florence Cacciola Trevelyan, which has come to George and Bob on the death of her husband Salvatore Trevelyan]. Mary is going to the Netherlands again in the first week of October, to work. He and Janet are going to Cambridge on Monday to look for a house; he will take up 'residence and full work there [as Regius Professor of History] in January'. Their mother was taken 'seriously ill' a few days ago; she has a nurse, but the doctor thinks she is over the immediate danger. George thinks it 'unlikely she will live more than another year' and that she will get to Welcombe again, though the plan was for her and Sir George to go in about three weeks. Their father 'seems fairly well, though on a permanently lower level than last year'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Read Robert's letter aloud to Caroline; they were both very interested by what he said about the [solar] eclipse, which was similar to their own experiences; also by the account of Canon [James Maurice] Wilson who has always been 'something of a myth' to Sir George, since his closest associates mentioned Wilson frequently but he himself never met him; he must have been an 'extraordinary genius' given what Robert says of the 'relative powers' of Henry Sidgwick, with whom Wilson shared the Bell Scholarship. Julian will remember knowing such a man all his life. George has been staying at Oriel [College, Oxford] to read at the Bodleian and reports seeing a 'beautiful mural tablet' to Arthur Sidgwick' at Corpus [Christi]; quotes and discusses the last line. He and Caroline both value Robert and Bessy's letters, but he does not know how they can 'adequately answer them': Caroline is 'incapable' of writing letters 'with any business in them' and cannot really exert herself to write at all, while he has a great deal to do about the estates and domestic management but is 'very weak and often ill'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - States that in "Domesday Book" 'Treveljan' is listed with a proprietor called Offa; suggests he was an ancestor. He himself begins the 'authentic' family history later; there are twelve Trevelyans succeeding each other, father and eldest son, between the reigns of Henry III and Victoria. The author of the article about the Trevelyans wrote beforehand, but Sir George only told him about places where he could find photograph. Agrees completely with what Robert says about George's book ["History of England"]. He and Caroline very much want Robert to come and stay for a few nights in November; they are 'more or less invalids' but 'very contented' ones.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Caroline slept a good deal on the journey from Wallington, and 'bore it well'; he was more tired than ever before, and 'infinitely saddened' by seeing the 'same smokeless factories of the Industrial Midlands' and 'long rows of empty coal trucks as they saw on their way north four months ago [due to the coal workers' strike].

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - He and Caroline received and Robert and Elizabeth's letters this morning about Julian's success in the School Certificate; Julian impressed them favourably in 'character, intellect, and body'; found him very similar to his cousin George, which is a 'compliment to them both'. Envies Julian seeing the "Mikado" for the first time. Has had two months now of the 'horrid wound' [to his hand], though it is now a scar rather than a war; is much weaker but cannot expect to be otherwise.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - They have seen and discussed Elizabeth's letter to Aunt Anna [Philips], who is 'as always very kind and considerate' about it. Caroline is anxious to see her, and they would like her to come with Julian from 28 August to 2 September, when she is due at Scarborough. It will be a very quiet visit, since neither of them are strong.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Is worried about the thirty five pounds [his payment towards Julian's school fees]: has an entry in his private account book for the 30 Apr, and a letter from Drummonds dated 1 May and acknowledging the receipt of his instructions to transfer the money, so they have either forgotten to do so or sent Elizabeth's pass book too soon for the entry of the transfer to be made; if the latter is not the case he will remind them. They are uncertain and anxious about when they will go to Wallington, as he has grown much weaker recently; thinks Caroline is now the stronger; they had hoped to go north on 8 June.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad Robert had so good a time in the Netherlands; Caroline had a 'very full' letter from Elizabeth today with news of herself and Julian, and the 'whole plan' seems to have been very successful. Mrs Stinchcombe [the Welcombe housekeeper] has had a visit from a nephew, whose father is the manager of a 'boot-business at Northampton'; Sir George sends an enclosure with information about his achievements; his aunt had not realised how well he was doing until his fellowship at [St]. John's. Sir George 'never saw a more modest, good looking, impressive young fellow'. His own health is declining, and he is 'less and less fit for work or for general company', but can expect nothing else. They hope to go north in June; will let Robert know nearer the time whether they will be well enough for a visit before then.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Likes writing to Settignano; sends his regards to Robert's host [Bernard Berenson]. Is grateful for the photograph of Aulla [home of Robert's friends the Waterfields]; has tried to get a sense of it by comparing photograph and letter, but will have to ask Elizabeth for further help when she comes tomorrow; hopes she has recovered from her bad cold. He and Caroline are quite well, but he is 'very perceptibly weaker every month or so', though he can still get household and financial business done, and enjoys his Greek and Latin reading 'at least as much as ever'; has now finished re-reading Tacitus, Herodotus, and the first half of Thucydides, which he intends now to finish alongside Xenophon's "Hellenica" and some Suetonius; praises Suetonius's biographies of Augustus and Julius Caesar.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - He and Caroline are glad to hear that Elizabeth hopes to come to see them at the beginning of March. Asks her to bring the violin; has asked about Mrs Howe to whom he will make the 'usual present' given as a fee when she plays in nearby towns and villages to accompany Elizabeth. He and Caroline are weaker, but 'not spoiled as host and hostess for such as you'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Has paid thirty five pounds for Julian's school fees into her account at Drummonds, and will do the same again in April. Anna [Philips] has told them much about the 'wise and happy life at the Shiffolds'. He and Caroline are both happy, though neither of them are very well; it is a great comfort to have Aunt Anna with them.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Is returning 'the Report' [from Julian's school?] in 'an envelope worthy of it'; it has been studied with 'much interest, sympathy and satisfaction' by all three of them [Sir George, Caroline, and Anna Philips], and they appreciated Elizabeth's letter. He has not been very well, and needed comforting as he cannot afford to be ill with Caroline 'as she is'; he is better now but still 'rather pulled down'. Glad Elizabeth likes the aerial landscape, and the Lady Desborough letter; she was an 'exquisitely beautiful child' when they used to see her often at her uncle Henry Cowper's house.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Delighted to hear of what Robert, Elizabeth, and Julian are reading [something by Byron?]; 'curious' how 'such trifles' are only written by people of the calibre of Byron, Scott, Burns and Macaulay; gives several quotations. Gratified by what Robert says about the letter to Lady Desborough [11/199 probably also refers to this]. Robert seems to be confusing separate incidents from Garibaldi's life. Best Christmas wishes to Robert and family. Caroline much 'appreciates and cherishes' Elizabeth's letters.

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