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Trevelyan, George Macaulay (1876–1962), historian, public educator, and conservationist
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will write to Jan Hubrecht at once and invite him; sorry M. [Ambrosius?] and Mad. H[ubrecht] are staying for such a short time. Has had interesting letters from Robert about the Chantrey Com[mission]n, [Roger] Fry and so on; he will be glad when Elizabeth comes. C[harles] and M[ary] hope to get into their new house on 8 August; G[eorge] and J[anet] are going to see Aunt Annie [Philips] tomorrow. If Elizabeth thinks Mary can play well enough to accompany her, they can 'make her practice'; it is very kind of Elizabeth to say she will play at a party. Caroline has to organise the Tenant's party. Asks if Elizabeth's subscription to the G[rosvenor] Cr[escent] Club is due; Caroline will give her the money when they meet; believes the Club has changed management.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - Has enjoyed reading [Robert's translation of Sophocles'] "Antigone"; Humphry also looked at it 'with great interest' since he has been studying the original at school. The translation seems as 'excellent and successful' as Bob's translation of the "Oresteia"; hopes it will also be acted at Old Sarum. Sends love to Bessie, and to Julian when he 'comes home [from school]'.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Is very happy to hear Trevelyan might be coming; hopes he will be home as he has no important engagements in Rome in summer or early autumn; he could also come to Vallombrosa. His account will be at Trevelyan's disposal for the books, as long as Trevelyan gives a fortnight's notice of his or his friends' arrival. Recommends a few pensions in Florence, but knows little about Rome, and suggests asking Sylvia [Sprigge]. Hopes Julian is recovering, and that Trevelyan's 'domestic troubles may be resolved'; sends love to Bessie. Had a 'charming and most flattering letter' from Trevelyan's brother about his translation [G. M. Trevelyan, "English Social History"].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Good to hear that Julian is settled in his own nursery again; sure he remembers it 'as he notices so much'. Very glad that nurse [Mrs Catt] is really better, and hopes all will go well now. She and Sir George are settling down at Welcombe; they are alone till George and Janet come on Wednesday. Sir George says Elizabeth 'must not mind about paying'. Sends love to Bob, and says she 'will read the Medici letters [edited by Janet Ross] with much interest'. She and Sir George did not like the Post impressionists [the exhibition organised by Roger Fry at the Grafton Galleries] which 'leave the impression of a bad, & rather nasty dream, though [she] can see how clever some of it is'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

They are both [he and Georgie] wearing their 'flannel shirts now', which are 'very comfortable. The parson preached 'a Conservative speech about disestablishment (rather out of place where it was)', and they 'all laughed about it afterwards' since he 'kept calling the party for disestablishment robbers'. They had their paper-chase last Wednesday, but it rained [portion of text obscured by tape here]. Supposes everything will be taken to Grosvenor Crescent from Ennismore Gardens if the latter is to be let, and that it will be all right to send letters there. Does not think he needs 'anything particular'. Adds a postscript saying they are now reading Cicero and Horace; likes Cicero, though it is 'rather hard'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Begins the letter 'Dear as a daughter', which she says was used by 'an old Medici lady' in the book Robert has lent her ["Lives of the early Medici as told in their correspondence", by Janet Ross], which she finds interesting but has not yet finished. Annie [Philips] is here and seems well. Is more or less recovered from her 'little feverish attack'. Glad to have good news of Julian. Asks if Elizabeth can send back 'the Shetland scarf' if she is not using it, as it 'does not look as "invalidy" as a shawl'; glad she is better. The 'A.S's' [Arthur and Charlotte Sidgwick], Janet and George 'amalgamated well'. Asks if Elizabeth's maids have recovered, and hopes the nurse [Mrs Catt] is sleeping better. Miss Richardson is here and is going with TitBits [the horse] 'to see sights accompanied by Annie's maid'. Sir George was very pleased to get Robert's letter; he has had a correspondence 'with "the master" [of Trinity, Cambridge, Montagu Butler?] on classical things'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Intended to send a small book of his "Translations from Leopardi", but then decided to wait until Julian and Ursula next come here, as they 'might easily lose it moving about'. Pity they cannot come now, when the flowers in the woods are at their best. All quite well here; the [Sturge] Moores will return in a month. Originally enclosing, on Bessie's request, a photograph of 'the street in Forest Green that [Julian] used to admire'. The Bluths and Tet Htoot were here at Easter, but otherwise they 'seem to see nobody'. Hopes that Tet Htoot will bring two Chinese friends to visit. A 'bad London raid last night'; hopes he and the Bluths are all right; Irene [Cooper Willis?] has fortunately been away. Has very few friends in London now besides these, Logan [Pearsall Smith] and Alys [Russell]. Virginia [Woolf]'s death 'a great blow'; she 'felt she was going out of her mind again and could not face it'. Is re-reading "To the Lighthouse", his favourite of her books; is writing something on her for the "Abinger Chronicle", but it is 'impossible to say anything adequate in the way of criticism'. Forgets whether Julian knew her. Is continuing to translate Montaigne and getting 'a little bored with it'; 'much more fun writing poetry, even if it is not worth much'. Hopes Julian has managed to see Ursula at Taunton, and that she is well again. Has heard from G.M.T. [his brother George] that Charles is giving Wallington to the National Trust now instead of leaving it in his will; he will continue to live there, and one of the family (probably his son George Lowthian) will stay there after his death; this will save on death-duties so there will be much more money for the children. Supposes this should not be discussed until it is announced. Hopes Bessie will go with Miss Simpkins for a few days to George and Janet next month; otherwise she never 'goes away from here, which is not good for her'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Trevelyan

Hopes his father 'will go out' as then he will 'have some proper holidays'. Is getting on very well, as is G[eorgie]. There is to be a home match against Hartley Row next Wednesday. Is sending the [school news] paper, which is now printed 'instead of Cyclostyled', thinks this 'is a great improvement, though of course opinions may differ'. They have now begun studying Horace; thinks it is 'a good deal nicer that Caesar, or even than Virgil'. Hopes his father 'and Grandpapa are both quite well now'; comments on the 'fun we shall have in the hols'. Lawrence has given him the [birthday?] 'present of a very nice book'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry the 'pretty girl' [Hylkia Halbertsma, see 46/100] cannot stay with Elizabeth; wonders if she will have more success elsewhere; wonders whether, when Robert is settled with Madame Palumbo, Elizabeth could visit the Grandmonts at Taormina. Wishes she could have heard the concert [organised by Dolmetsch, see 46/100]; asks whether it was an artistic and financial success. Asks how she got on with the Arnolds; he [Ernest Penrose Arnold] 'had his faults' but both Robert and George owe much to him and his school [Wixenford]. The Arthur Severns have been visiting; she was Ruskin's niece [actually second cousin], and they live at Brantwood. Sir Courtenay Ilbert has also been; his daughters [Olive and Jessie] stayed with C[harles] and M[ary], as did F[rancis Dyke-] Acland and H[ilton] Young. George and Janet return to London on Monday; they want Robert and Elizabeth to dine with them and Caroline on 19 October, with a 'little party afterwards'; they could go to the theatre the night before. Amused by the idea of Elizabeth teaching a class; they are lucky to get her. Hopes [Helen] Fry is recovering; 'wretched for her' to be away from home as well.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - George gave Bob's [translation of] Theocritus to his father in law for his eightieth birthday, who has been reading it alongside the Greek and is 'full of admiration'. Having a 'great business here saving some of the wonderful Ashridge wilderness for the National Trust'; they have bought 'at least £40 000 worth' of land.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Expects this is the last letter he will write her from Ravello; will start on the 24th, spend some of that day at Pompeii and take the evening express to Florence, arriving next day. Bessie's last account of her 'patient' [her aunt] was better; hopes she may be recovering by the time he reaches the Hague. Has been unlucky with the weather for the last two years but should not complain, as if the weather had not been bad last January he may not have accompanied his brother [George?] to Sicily and met Bessie. In the same way, if the Grandmonts had had a cook at the start of 1896, they would not have dined at the Timeo so he would never have met them and heard of her; he ought to 'like all cooks for that henceforth'. Bessie's quotation from Dante was 'very charming'; asks if she copied it out at Ede before 2 September or after. Encloses a 'little relic' he found in his waistcoat pocket, which he has kissed; she too should 'put the bits [of the railway ticket] together and kiss them' since they brought her and Bob together and made them kiss each other, though she did not kiss him till November, and he kissed her wrist 'a whole month and more before'. Did not sleep well last night as '"that horrible little dog" Gyp (as Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] would say' was barking; Madame [von Wartburg] has the dog safe in her room tonight.

Finishes the letter next day; the weather is lovely, and he almost regrets leaving, but will enjoy a few days in Florence and seeing [Bernard] Berenson; wants to see what he thinks of his last year's poems, and what he has done on this play. He usually likes Bob's work, but not always. Discussion of how no one person can be relied on to say whether something is good or bad. Hopes to see a few pictures at Florence, though does not mean to do much sightseeing. Sorry that Bessie had to miss Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture; thinks she is right that she should not come to England before her aunt is nearly well. Glad that her cousin [Louise Hubrecht] and the Röntgens liked his poems; Bessie is indeed a 'fine advertising agent'. Describes his breakfast here and in England.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - Thanks Bob for his letter. Has already sent on the corrections [for his "History of England"] to Longman's, though they will be too late for a reprint this week. Glad Bob thought 'the Victorian part was tolerable'. The Epilogue was 'imposed' on George by the 'Publisher's view of necessity'; believes this view to be 'correct', but thinks the epilogue 'could not be anything but a blot'. Does not 'understand the age we live' and what he does understand he does not like. Mary is enjoying herself in the Netherlands; George believes 'her attachment will be permanent'. The introductions Bessie gave her 'have made a great difference to her happiness there'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The end of term is close: 'in fact there are less than 1,000,000 seconds' until it comes. The exam [for Harrow?] will be 'very exciting'. Though he has not yet decided on a 'present for Mr A[rnold]', Robert thinks he 'would like best something for his writing table, like a good paper-weight'; thinks it would be almost as good to get it at 'the beginning of the hols', though if his mother has already found something she could send it to Robert now.

Has written to C[harlie] today. G[eorgie] is 'quite well now, and is doing very well in his class'; Robert hopes he will be placed first or second. They did not go in for the history exam with the rest, as they were 'not good enough', but took it a month afterwards. Mr Arnold has got Mr [E.E.?] Bowen to 'look them over', and if they are good enough Mr Arnold will 'give a prize like Mr Bowen's'; if not, just an 'ordinary prize'.

They were beaten three-nil in the Farnborough match. Is reading 'Leslie Stephen's life of [Henry] Fawcett', and thinks it 'very interesting'. Is glad 'Spi[der?' is all right'; it is 'a great pity about Mr Gladstone'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear Julian is crawling now; will send a parcel for his birthday soon. Unlucky that Miss [Margaret?] V[aughan] Williams has caught measles; it can be bad in adults. Miss Martin came to Welcombe yesterday; they expect the Runcimans, Janet, and George on Saturday; think Charlie is also coming since he stayed at home with a cold last week. Thinks Elizabeth will like Mrs Walter Rea; glad she has 'such nice neighbours'. She and Sir George move to London on 22 Feb; she will go to the concert on the way from the station, and asks whether Elizabeth will be there. Asks how she liked 'the Spaniard' [Benvingut Socias i Mercadé, see 46/174]. Nice that Julian listens to music.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

36 Chelsea Park Gardens, SW3 [written on Athenaeum headed notepaper]. - Glad that Mary is visiting Bob and Bessie again. Went to Hallington two days ago, since he was lecturing at the Newcastle Lit[erary] and Phil[osophical Society], thinks it is 'a possible place to live in some day' if they had enough money to do so comfortably, with a motorcar 'which would be essential'. It is a 'conceivability in the future' since Mary and H[umphry] are 'fond of Northumberland', but for the moment they have 'two dear old ladies [Sarah and Matilda Spencer] as tenants' who keep the house and grounds in good repair; there is also a good tenant at the Cheviot farm. The 'immediate value of the place is, as always, rather less than appears on paper' due to charges and so on; a third of the net annual amount will go to Bob, as agreed.

Postcard from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Sends Trevelyan's cap. He and his wife are much grieved at the cause of Trevelyan's departure [the sudden death of his nephew Theodore]; they hope to see him and his wife soon. Asks if Trevelyan could write to C. H. Reilly a formal testimonial, regarding Abercrombie's suitability for the post of literary adviser to the Liverpool Repertory Theatre. There will be a board meeting on Wednesday and Reilly is chair [see also 1/37].

Card from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S. W. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; glad she likes Theodore [as a name for his son]; Jan is 'doing extremely well now'. Is sure that Miss [Ivy] Pretious 'could not get away', but Miss [Mary] Sheepshanks might; gives her address. Miss Sheepshanks 'certainly answers to [Bessie's] description' and is a 'very interesting person with many fine qualities both of mind & character'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Has just read Bob's "Meleager" with 'real excitement'; thinks it has 'great power and romance and originality' as well as Bob's usual 'careful artistry'. Supposes Bob invented 'the idea of the ghosts', which is 'very effective'. Glad that Bob brought in the family motto ['Time... trieth troth'] which is the best George knows. Mary much enjoyed her visit to Bob and Bessie at the Shiffolds.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad that Elizabeth has heard of some nurses who may suit her, but sorry that she has this trouble. Good that Julian is so well; she and Sir George hope to visit in October and see him. Thinks [E. M.] Forster must be interesting, since his novels are 'so clever & original', though she does not think he manages plot well. Has been reading [Myra Kelly's] "Little Aliens", about 'the little Jew children in America', which is 'pretty & funny; but quite slight'. Sorry Mr [Donald] Tovey is not progressing quickly, but it must require much work to write the music for an opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]; probably best that it will not be put on next summer, as 'the world will be simply mad over the Coronation'. George's children are 'much improved': Mary has shown no signs of temper; Theo is 'passionate occasionally' but still young, and a 'very nice boy'; [Humphry] seems quite strong now.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad the invalid [Thomas Sturge Moore] has recovered, and that Mrs Moore is such a good friend; hopes he is not 'delicate'. Sir George has sent a hare and duck which he shot himself. Caroline sends part of a letter from Miss Jones and some newspaper reports; asks Elizabeth to destroy Miss Jones's note and return the reports to her at 37 Broadwater Down, Tunbridge Wells. Glad Elizabeth enjoyed the Conference [of the Women's Liberal Associations?]; Mrs [Eva?] McClaren is 'bold' and 'uncompromising', but also 'warmhearted... cultivated' and charming. Knows Mrs [Frances] H[eron] Maxwell from the Westminster Women's Liberal Association; her 'appearance is really terrible' but she is a 'very good woman', most energetic, and 'sympathetic with working women'. Mary wrote a paper on land value and read it at the [Women's Liberal Associations] Conference at Sunderland; Caroline is very pleased they are both interested in the work she likes so much. Sure Maria [Springett] will enjoy making Elizabeth comfortable; Aunt Annie will be at Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] on Friday afternoon. Sir George has been asking how the [building of the new] house is going; perhaps Robert can write about it. Asks when they are going abroad, and whether Elizabeth has found anyone to go with her. Will send flowers on Monday. Hopes Robert's proofs are going well[ for "The Birth of Parsival?]. George's book ["England Under the Stuarts]" is just coming out.

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

Calcutta. - Letter of introduction to Arindam Dutt, who is coming to England to study for the Bar and join a British university; his father, Charu Dutt, a retired Civil Service man is 'one of the finest men in India'. Young Dutt will try to get into Cambridge through the 'usual wearisome official channels' such as the India High Commissioner's office; should he fail, Suhrawardy asks if Trevelyan can give him an introduction to Lowes Dickinson, Keynes, or his brother [George]. Also asks if Trevelyan can invite Dutt to his club; fears he will have a lonely time at first. Has been enjoying "The Fountain", by [Charles] Morgan, which has much about Holland and the Dutch; thought Bessie might be interested, if she has not read it. A postscript notes that their mutual friend Chanda has married young Dutt's only sister.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Casa al Dono, Vallombrosa (Prov. di Firenze). - Is here for a brief holiday; returns to Metelliano today then will go to Rome on the 17th. All fine about Trevelyan's friends [the Deuchars]; asks if they should be met in Florence, in which case Nicky [Mariano] can manage like last year, or if they can wait till Rome where he would be pleased to meet them. Will see Desmond [MacCarthy] in Venice for the PEN Congress; regrets he will not see Trevelyan or his brother [George]. Was not able to finish his letter at Casa al Dono and signs off from Metelliano.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Supposes this will be the last time he writes to her 'from here [Wixenford]'. Mr A[rnold] has let him look at the Times of the 8th, and he has read 'Papa's speech', though he 'could not get through much of the G[rand] O[ld] M[an - Gladstone]'s speech'; does hope 'his bill [the Government of Ireland Bill] will not be passed'; Gladstone 'must be a wonderfully strong man to speak for 3 hours and 25 minutes at his age'. It will be all right if they get Mr Arnold's present on Saturday. Thinks G[eorgie] is 'doing very well in his examinations', and does not see why he should not get a history prize. Expects he himself will get a history prize, but 'Mr B[owen?]' says he was 'not as good as the other boy who got the real prize'; in the [Harrow?] examination, 'those who do not pass the first paper cannot go in for the other two'; as Robert could not have passed the first one, he would not have been able to do the others, and it was in those that he came top; B[owen] says he did the last 'very well'. Sackville-West has had a bad 'feverish attack' and will not be able to do any more work this term. O'Brien took the exam at Charterhouse last Wednesday, and 'got a good place'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Expecting Elizabeth with pleasure on the 9th. Julian is very well. Hopes Elizabeth has a good time at Cambridge; it will be interesting to stay in the College [Newnham?]; asks to be remembered to Miss [Mary?] Fletcher, whose post [Librarian] must be 'delightful. Elizabeth must not worry about Caroline's [Belgian] refugees: George thinks there might be a delay in sending them [to Snitterfield: see 11/10] as the Central Committee is 'so overwhelmed'. It is George's birthday; Mary planned that he should plant a tree, but it is pouring with rain. Elizabeth will be glad when her guest [Catherine Abercrombie] is 'sent off home': she should be very grateful to Elizabeth. Thinks Miss Evans 'manages Julian very well'; he is not always obedient and 'wants a strong hand'.

Letter from Gilbert Murray to R. C. Trevelyan

131 Banbury Road, Oxford. - "Sisyphus" is 'delightful and extraordinary'; has only just read it as when it arrived he was about to leave for Italy and by mistake it did not go with him. Likes it better than anything else by Trevelyan he knows: 'so individual... has such a strange blend of grotesqueness and beauty running through it - very Aristophanic in some ways'. Though the 'queer broken-backed metres... bothered [him]' for a while, they fit the theme. Is a little disappointed in the 'Artemis-chastity point': even he 'would not have accepted such an oath, and Sisyphus had much more knowledge of the world than a don'. Wonders about performance: no doubt Trevelyan has music; to Murray's taste 'music will bedevil and ruin it' but others would not agree. Would be expensive if there is much music; if not, suggests sending it to Charles Strachey or to GBS [George Bernard Shaw] for the Stage Society. Does not know Trevelyan's address, so is sending it to his brother [George?].

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