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Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Nora will write to her about the wedding arrangements. The relatives on his side coming to the ceremony are 'A.S.' [Arthur Sidgwick],' C.S.S.' [Charlotte Sidgwick], 'E.W.B.' [Edward Benson], 'M.B.' [Minnie Benson], 'E[dward] Sidgwick, Lucy Sidgwick, W. Crofts, 'Mr W. C.', 'and perhaps Ellen with Miss Clough (Uncle John and Etty declining)', and that all the others he invited have declined. Besides these guests there are four or five friends of his, including Miss Clough, who are definitely coming, and one or two more who are probably coming. There will be about four times as many guests on Nora's side. Sends his love to Mary.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Remarks that it seems 'an immense time' since he left Rugby, even though it has only been a fortnight. Reports that he had to move into other rooms when he first came up to Cambridge, as the floors in his own rooms were rotten. Is back in his own rooms now, where he has installed a new stove. Is glad that she enjoyed her visit to London. Wishes that he could have spent more time in the [Great] Exhibition, and comments on some of the works, including the statue of the 'Reading Girl' [by Pietro Magni], and Story's Cleopatra. Has recovered his watch from Wellington College. Comments that Minnie appears to be very busy. Remarks that there has been some theological excitement in consequence of Bishop Colenso's publication in the Guardian. Reports that it was believed for some time that the Reverend F.D. Maurice was going to resign his preferment, and come to reside [in Cambridge] 'in order to write freely on theological topics - but he has decided not to do so.' Reports that Kingsley is lecturing [very well] on America, and is writing in Macmillan's Magazine 'a child's tale [The Water Babies] so absurd that [Henry] almost thought he was cracked'. Hopes that his mother's legal difficulties will be resolved satisfactorily.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes from 7 Athelstan Road, Margate;, having stayed last year in nearby Ethelbert Terrace; comments that 'all this part of the town was built by some fanatical Anglo-Saxon'; intends to be there for ten more days. Thinks that he never wrote to thank her for Miss Thackeray's books. Relates that he has been staying with the [Leslie] Stephens since he left Cambridge, where he has seen Miss Thackeray. Reports that she is going to write 'another Fairy Tale - Jack and the Bean-stalk', which is still a secret; she also told him some interesting things about Browning and Red Cotton Nightcap Country'; will tell his mother if she has ever 'read or tried to read that singular production'.

Recommends Mrs Cornish's novel Alcestis and Mrs Webster's dramatic poem The Auspicious Day; this made him cry while he was supervising the Local Examination in London, though he 'was perched so high that sixty-five young ladies could see... an Examiner Weep'. Asks her tell Arthur 'that Symonds's Greek Poets is very good in parts - on the whole, better than [Symonds's book about] Dante - and will improve his mind.' Asks how are all her affairs. Reports that 'many sympathizing strangers in London enquired after Rugby', but that he told them that the situation was unchanged. Reports also that all the M.P.s he has seen 'believe in the "Conservative Reaction" so that possibly H. H[ayman] may be made a Dean soon'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Refers to her last letter, which he was glad to get. Reports that he is living 'uneventfully and somewhat lazily' in Cambridge, trying to write something for a book that he is working on. Hopes to go to Rugby about 22 September. Is glad to hear that Isabel 'is getting on; thinks 'Nevil' a very good name for the new baby [Isabel and William Sidgwick's son]. Asks her to tell him something about 'Arthur's young lady [Charlotte Sophia Wilson]'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to write and tell him what she thinks of Arthur's engagement; is glad to think that he is going to be married, but admits to being surprised. Refers to Rugby, about which he 'had much to say'. Looks forward to seeing her. Reports that his life is 'highly uneventful but not unhappy', and that his work is 'in a lingering state.' Wishes to hear what she says about 'the Lincoln domicile' [E. W. Benson had recently been made Chancellor of the diocese of Lincoln]. Believes that he may sometime acquire 'the same fraternal feeling for that cathedral town' that he 'now has for the fir-woods of Wellington College'; wonders whether he will ever go to Wellington again. Inquires whether she sees Macmillan, and claims that [William Black's] 'Princess of Thule is a very pretty slightly woven story'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Should have written sooner, but has been very busy of late with correspondence connected with the lectures for women. Reports that they have just expanded the scheme, 'by constructing an Association to which any one may belong'; she herself will be a member if she continues to pay her guinea subscription.

Is glad that her 'view of things' seems so cheerful. Presumes that 'the Governing Body [of Rugby School?] do not intend to treat the matter lightly'. Is glad that her plans for 'the winter campaign' seem pretty settled, and asks her when she intends to start [for abroad]. Wishes to arrange about his Christmas visits. Believes that Symonds may be 'on that coast about the same time'. Reports that has 'gone a seavoyaging for a few months, and thinks of staying some time on his return at Cannes: where he has an invalid sister [Lady Strachey]'

Reports that he saw Edward [Benson] the other day, 'looking very well', and wishing 'for the "leisure of a Headmaster"'; he gave a fair account of Mary. Hopes to see William soon. Would like to go to Rugby for a Sunday, but does not think he can get away for more than one that term, and he is to go to Oxford. Sends his love to his aunt Henrietta, and asks his mother to tell her that he 'shall bargain for at least a sketch of Mentone as a reward for [his] services as escort.' Adds that he is very well.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from London]:- Says 'all is over [regarding the dismissal of Hayman, headmaster of Rugby School], and as well as could be expected'; it is 'vexatious that everything should be so uncertain about Arthur, but all things human are missed'. Reports that it is rumoured that 'H. H[ayman]' intends to resist, but that [Charles or Edward?] Bowen says that the latter 'will only lose his money', and has not 'a legal leg to stand on.' Refers to the Times of that day, which is 'as good as can be expected'. Does not feel as happy as he expected, but 'the relief is very great'.

Is sorry to hear about his mother's heath; admits to have been worried about the journey that she intends to make, and claims to be relieved that the idea has been given up. States that Easter is a much more suitable time to travel, and hopes that he himself shall be able to go with her. Announces that he goes to Lincoln on 29 December. Reports that an announcement of his book appears in the Athenaeum and in the Manchester Courier, and that he has received a note from J. H. Lace [his cousin], asking for a copy. Claims that she never answered his letter about his 'Association'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he has decided 'with much regret' that he cannot leave Cambridge during the coming vacation, as he is too busy. Had intended to come down to her, but explains that about two weeks previously he had a bad attack of indigestion while he was trying to finish some work. Though he was recovering after taking a holiday, he wanted to see a doctor before resolving to work through the vacation and, on going to London 'on the business of Miss Clough's new house [for female students in Cambridge], consulted Gladstone's doctor, Andrew Clark, about his health. The latter diagnosed 'a tendency to rheumatic gout', put him on a strict diet, but let him go back to Cambridge to work.

Hopes to have 'a really good holiday' in the Long Vacation. Asks for news of Arthur; declares that he ought to be coming to England about that time. Refers to events at Rugby, and the attacks in the newspapers thereon. Claims that it was 'a clever trick of Hayman's lawyers to put the matter into Malins' court: no other judge would have allowed so much [ ] talk about the merits of a case which he knew he was not going to try on it's [sic] merits.' Hopes that she has been feeling well and it getting through her [ ] of removal'. Asks her to let him know of 'any Rugby or domestic news', and if she hears anything about Temple. Declares that he is sorry for him

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Is in Cambridge again, 'reading in a lazy way, and taking a little real holiday.' Finds that he cannot take a holiday in London, as it is 'too exciting', and declares that he craves uniformity in his life. Is glad to hear from Dr Bateson and Mrs C. Bowen among others 'that everything went off charmingly at Rugby'. Reports that his hay fever 'has been wonderfully absent' that year. States that he wrote to Mrs Howell, and that he did not happen to find anyone who knew about Oban. Announces that he is going to London on the following Monday, and gives his address on Savile Row. Reports that everybody speaks to him in praise of Arthur's wife. Declares that he has been investigating Spiritualism, and asks if she is interested.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from London]:- Regrets that he must give up his research into the subject of Spiritualism, due to his work commitments, but hopes to take it up again sometime in the future; calls it 'a most perplexing subject', with 'so much crass imposture and foolish credulity mixed up in it' that it is not surprising that 'men of science' refuse to have anything to do with it. Refers approvingly to Crookes' articles in the Quarterly Journal of Science giving evidence in support of the phenomena, and reports that he [Crookes] 'is exhibiting before the Royal Society experiments of novel and great interest on the motive force of heat'.

Reports that they have had tremendous heat in London, which has made him almost unable to work. Announces that he is now going back to Cambridge for a few days to finish his book, which he hopes to have printed soon. States that it is too technical to give him any general reputation. Hopes that Miss Temple is better. Asks her, if she says anything to 'the Bishop [Frederick Temple]' about Spiritualism, to say that 'no one should pronounce on the prima facie case for serious investigation'. Announces that he is going to the Lakes in August, and that he shall try to see Mary early in September. Asks her to give his 'kind remembrances' to her hosts.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Lincoln]:- Explains that he has been putting off writing because of 'a sense of incompleteness' about his life. Considers his life 'in three aspects'; in relation to his book [The Methods of Ethics], in relation to his enquiry into Spiritualism, and in relation to 'the holiday-making which may be supposed to be the proper business of the month of August.' Reports that Macmillan has decided to take on his book, and to give him half profits. Had urged Macmillan to show a portion of the MS to Mr John Morley, the editor of the Fortnightly Review, because it is 'written in a rather obscure and technical style, intended primarily for students', he [Henry] feared that it was unfair on Macmillan to ask him to take the risk of publishing the book, but Morley said that the book ought to generate a fair amount of interest, and to pay its expenses. Reports that since then he has been correcting proof sheets.

States that he has plenty of time to spare and has been researching Spiritualism. Reports that he went to stay with Lord Rayleigh early in August to meet Mrs Jencken, 'one of the original Fox girls, in connexion with whom these singular phenomena first attracted attention in America in 1848.' Declares that they heard 'an abundance of "raps" ', but that the experiment that they were trying did not succeed. After leaving Rayleigh he spent a fortnight at Hallsteads. Reports that 'many remarkable phenomena had occurred there before [he] arrived, which were all the more interesting because there was no public medium', and gives details of these incidents. Declares that Hallsteads [home of Walter and Annie Marshall] to be a charming place, and that he enjoyed his stay there very much. Reports that all at Lincoln [new home of his sister and brother-in-law] are well, that Mary is apparently very well, and that the boys are 'in excellent spirits.' Offers his 'sincere commiserations on the matrimonial engagement', and hopes that she is bearing up against the blow.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Explains that he has been busy with much official correspondence. Confirms that he will try to go to Rugby at Christmas, and states that there are other engagements which may prevent him. Reports that he nearly went to Oxford [where his mother now lives] at the beginning of the term, but was prevented at the last moment by business in Cambridge. States that the 'Education of Women' hampers his movements more than would otherwise be the case.

Hopes that she does not find the work of establishment very tiring, and notes that she does not mention whether Mary has arranged matters 'with her "young man" ', and when she is going to leave her. Reports that Edward is with him in Cambridge, and that he gave very good accounts of Mary and the children; 'Martin has already plunged into ephemeral literature and become a contributor to the Wykehamist [the Winchester College school magazine]'. Refers also to Arthur and Edward. In relation to his enquiries into Spiritualism, reports that he does not have much to tell about them. Believes that the young men in Cambridge are beginning to become very interested in the subject. Admits that he had forgotten about the G[ ], and states that he will go and give her message.

Letter from Eleanor Balfour to Mary Sidgwick

Henry wishes her to write to Mary about the arrangements for the wedding. Discusses arrangements for guests to arrive at 4 Carlton Gardens after the wedding service. Explains that they [the Balfours] have two carriages: one will take her and Henry back to the house and the other will take her sister [Alice?]; they could then send one back to the church to collect Mary. She and Henry intend to leave 'by a 2.5 train from Victoria.' They are going up to Carlton Gardens on Friday or Saturday. It is very inconvenient not to be able to get into the house: it makes arrangements so much more difficult. They went to Cambridge the previous day to see a house, which they are thinking of taking 'at Midsummer', and thought it looked comfortable, but it is not quite finished yet.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Haileybury]:- Remarks on the unfairness of the fact that because Arthur does not write to her, she does not write to him: Henry arrived at this conclusion from a message he got from [J. M.?] Wilson when he saw him at Trevelyan's dinner. Reports that he is 'pretty well' and 'tolerably busy'. Has been examining a school lately, and has made good progress with his Arabic. Adds that his eyes are pretty well. Reports that Trevelyan has gone down for good; his father has been appointed financial member of the Indian Council and his son is to be his private secretary. Observes that Trevelyan is the last of the friends that he made as an undergraduate, but declares that there are lots of nice men still at the university, and that he has not lost the power of making friends. States, however, that he feels that he is growing old, and 'probably appear[s] a great Don to freshmen'.

Is anxious to hear the result of the Great Ladkin case; asks 'is the monster subdued or have [they] had to "eat the [Leck]". Reports that Mrs Kingsley enquired after his mother; Mrs Kingsley has had quite a long illness, from which she is now recovered, and he has not seen anything of the Kingsleys this term. Declares Miss [Rose?] Kingsley to be 'a very nice girl.' Asks whether his mother has seen Kingsley's letters in the Times, and comments that most people at Cambridge think that he has done good by them, but observes that he has been 'as usual hasty and one-sided.' Believes that the Manchester people ought to have spoken before. States that he saw Temple's letter, which was 'very good as always', and comments on his testimony as to conduct of manufacturers.

Reports that Arthur is very well, and that he himself is staying with [A. G.] Butler in Hertfordshire. He saw Miss Mulock, who was staying with [Alexander?] Macmillan, some days previously; she 'looks pleasant and sympathetic, yet hardly capable of the powerful delineation of passion one meets with in her books'; she is said to be 'odd' and to 'come to evening parties in her morning dress'.

Attributes his mother's epistolary silence to dissipation, and asks if everybody on the Bilton Road asked her out to dinner, and whether they shall 'entertain "all manner of Dukes" as Arthur says' when they return. Asks if any family catastrophe has occurred. Tells her if she meets any Trinity man she may tell them that [J. L.] Hammond is going to be Bursar. Declares that Mr Martin is looking better every week; that Professor Sedgwick is flourishing, and is expected to lecture the following year 'for "positively the last time" as he has said any time the last ten years.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Claims to be ashamed of not having answered her first letter, and remarks that it is such an unusual thing to owe her a letter. States that he had hoped to go and see her that term just before the examinations, but explains that a friend of his has just arranged a visit to him, so he must postpone it. Announces that he is to spend the Long Vacation in England, and therefore shall be free to accept invitations then. Declares that had had also wished to go to Rugby at the end of the term. Reports that he is very busy with examinations, and if his hayfever gets worse, he 'must not venture...' as his eyes 'may be taken bad: [which] would be a disastrous preliminary to the study of Hebrew...' Remarks that Arthur seems to have enjoyed himself very much at Rugby, and reports that he heard from their mother that day, but that she seemed 'rather dull.' Announces that he is going up to town the following day, 'and shall try and cast a hurried glance over the Academy', but must be back in Cambridge again on Thursday morning as he has to 'non-placet a Grace of the senate (petitioning against Mr Bouverie's bill [to repeal the "Conformity to the Liturgy" clause in the Act of Uniformity).' Explains that the non-placeters are in 'a miserable minority', and he doesn't wish to make it even smaller.

Reports that he dined with the Kitcheners at Newmarket some days ago, 'and saw E. R[hodes]', who 'is not so good in conversation as Miss (Annette) Kitchener, though her writing is decidedly more powerful.' Regrets to hear that his mother is still 'a sleeping partner of the [Initial S]ociety.' Asks her whether he ever showed her some things he translated 'in Iphigenia in [ ]', and quotes from it. Declares that he is getting to know a great deal about English history, and is 'wondering whether a book could be written about it at once short, instructive and interesting.' Advises her to read Goldwin Smith's lectures, which are 'so carefully composed that it is a real pleasure to read them independently of anything one learns from them.' Asks her to keep for him a pair of laced boots, which he believes he left at her house. Asks her to send back Ch[ ] some time.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Doesn't expect 'the "general public" ' to read much of his book [Methods of Ethics]. Claims that the point of it is that 'it treats in a technical and precise manner questions which are ordinarily discussed loosely and popularly.' Claims to be now 'very jolly and sufficiently idle', and awaits the reviews. Reports that Arthur has asked him to go to Rugby 'on the 2d'. States that he shall have to go away 'on the 7th' or earlier. Wishes to have a long talk with his mother, and suggests that he might go to her from Cheltenham 'on Friday [the first] and go on to Rugby the next day.' Asks if this arrangement would suit her.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Newcastle]:- Regrets to hear that she has been 'dreary and depressed.' Explains that he has been so busy with the correspondence of 'the women's schemes' that he has almost given up all other letter-writing. Refers to his book [The Methods of Ethics], and to some reviews of it, including those in the Spectator; and that by Sully in the Examiner, to which Arthur refers and which he thinks is 'the best... or at least the one most gratifying to the author'. Will probably produce another book in three or four years' time, and due to the reception of this one will 'do the work with more ease and confidence' and therefore he hopes 'better'. Also hopes the sales of this book 'will have been good enough to induce Macmillan to run the risk of another'.

In relation to his investigation into Spiritualism, states that the phenomena that they have witnessed 'are very extraordinary', and that the test that they have applied 'have so far failed to indicate any imposture on the part of the mediums'. They hope to be able to apply stricter tests when the mediums come to London in the next few days. Announces that he returns to Cambridge the following day for two nights, and then to London.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to say that he is pleased with her news [of his cousin Annie's engagement]. States that his recollections of Stephen Marshall 'are altogether pleasant', and asks why she should be surprised. Thinks that the marriage seems to be 'in every way most suitable.' Declares that he is very busy in various ways, and is occupied with the investigation of Spiritualism. Undertakes to send the Examiner if he can find it. Claims that he is very well and as he is still 'taking a holiday from hard brain-work', nothing disagrees with him.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Broadstairs]:- Reports that he is settled in the same house with Isabel; he arrived the previous Friday, and has secured rooms there until Saturday 3 July. Intends to go to London early on 5 July, and they are going to being a new series of experiments on 6 July. Will be in London until 20 July, and is considering paying one or two visits until about the middle of August, when he plans to settle down in Cambridge. Reports that [Broadstairs] 'seems very salubrious', and that Nevil [his nephew] appears to be in excellent health and spirits. Declares that Isabel is very kind and does her best to make him comfortable. Reports that his book has sold as well as [Alexander?] Macmillan had expected, and a second edition is being discussed. Reports that two-hundred and fifty copies have gone to the United States, and he sends her the enclosed card [not included] to prove that is fame is 'More Than European!'

Is at present 'in a lazy state working languidly at an article [he has] to write for a new journal on Philosophy [Mind]'. Intends to be relatively idle for a few months, and does not feel inclined to work on a new book just yet. Is glad that [his cousin] Anne's wedding went off well. Reports that his uncle Robert wrote to him to say that [his cousin] Chris was considering coming to Cambridge to study Moral Sciences, and asks if she has heard anything about this. Does not feel sure that it is a wise scheme. Supposes that he has been stimulated by Stephen Marshall's example, 'and perhaps thinks home will be dull without Annie'. Hopes that she has a good visit at Lincoln [to the Bensons]. Informs her that 'H P. goes back to London early on the 5th July' and tells her to write to him before that.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Refers to 'the enclosed' [not included; probably a letter from the Master of Trinity], 'which means an addition of £250 a year to [his] income and an established position [as' Praelector of Moral and Political Philosophy]; it is a great relief to him that he is 'quite fixed' in Cambridge. Announces that he will come to see her in Oxford as soon as he can. Hopes that she will come and see him in Cambridge. Asks her to tell William the news.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that he has wanted to write to Myers since he and Nora went back to Cambridge [after his mother's funeral], but claims that he finds it difficult to write 'not from painfulness of feeling', since his mother's death 'seems really a release, but from perplexity and mingledness.' Writes that he feels as if he had 'reached the summit of the Pass of Life: behind the old memories from infancy, unrolled like a map, and before the strange world of "the majority" near though in a mist, at which [he is] forced to gaze. And more than ever the alternatives of the Great Either-Or seem to be Pessimism or Faith'.

Reports that Nora was away 'all the time at Terling'. States that, although she was not seriously ill, he had been worried about her, but she considers herself quite well now.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Hopes that she has recovered from her trip to the dentist. States that he would have come to London to see her had he not been so busy. Encourages her to come to Cambridge to see Newnham Hall 'with the first bloom on it'; the 'house is full', all is going well so far, and all those involved have 'the sense of repose and tranquil pleasure with which one reaches the top of the first stage in climbing a hill!'. Undertakes to get her 'a comfortable room at the 'Hoop'. Refers to 'the enclosed' [not included], which he wishes her to send back.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Explains that the reason that he would like her to come to Cambridge is so that she may see Newnham Hall with 'the first bloom on it.' Reports that the house is full, and that everything is going on satisfactorily so far. Assures her that she may come any other time, but informs her that he goes away for the vacation on 10 December. Reports that Edward came up to Cambridge to elect Stuart professor [of Mechanism and Applied Mechanics], but he did not see him, as he was only in town for an hour. Hopes that her dental arrangements 'are going on as well as can be expected', and that her Rogers 'is not the real Rogers'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from A. Balfour's house, Strathconan, Ross-shire]:- Explains that his last letter to her was written on their journey from Edinburgh. Refers to the 'charm of the scenery', and to the nearby hills, one of which they climbed a day or two previously. Reports that his brothers-in-law began to stalk deer on the previous Monday, and that they have killed four stags. States that they are 'now living almost entirely on the produce of the chase of various kinds'; is glad she likes the grouse sent to her. Reports that he has gone with Nora to visit two or three people 'in the "Strath", one of them a woman living in almost the only remaining specimen of the stone hovels that a generation ago were the ordinary houses [there]'. Remarks on the resemblance of the Highland people to Irishmen 'as [they] ordinarily imagine them, and refers to a woman whom they visited, 'who said "at all at all" just like an Irishwoman in fiction' but he 'did not detect in her household arrangements any of the recognised defects of the Irish character'. States that they have promised to stay there until the following Wednesday, and he thinks that they will then return to Cambridge. Reports that Nora sends her love, and expresses their concern that she has had some pain in her hand.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from 18 Brookside, Cambridge]:- Reports that they have been 'vibrating between London and Cambridge for about ten days', and that Nora 'has nearly arranged the furniture of [their] new house [Hillside] to her satisfaction.' Expects that they shall probably transfer themselves into their new house in the week after the following week. Hopes that his mother is recovering and that she will soon be able to go out. Reports that they are beginning to have 'some lovely after-summer days' in Cambridge. Hopes that B[ ] has recovered from his attack. Reports that is is 'absolutely "saison morte" in Cambridge', but that there happen to be one or two friends there. Remarks that 'there is a prevailing theory that Cambridge is unhealthy in September', and he believes that this is because everyone goes away then, not vice versa.

Reports that he has had a letter from his uncle Robert, who informs him that the Pet[ ] Charity expects to get some money from the charity commissioners for the better education of girls in Shipton, and that an inquiry is to be held on 25 September. Does not think that 'the "Public Day School Company" have ever tried to deal with the case of towns of that size', and he is very doubtful what advice he ought to give to his uncle about the matter. Informs her that their cook 'has just achieved the manufacture of Fondu and S[ ] Pudding' from the receipts his mother gave him. Announces that Roden Noel is coming to stay with them on the following Wednesday. Refers to Temple's letter about the Eastern Question in the Times. States that Nora sends her love.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Hillside, Cambridge]:- States that he has been occupied in preparing his annual report of the 'A.F.P.T.H.E.O.W.I.C.' [the Association for Promoting the Higher Education of Women in Cambridge], which is, he informs her, the association of which she is one of the patrons. Reports that Nora 'is doing mathematics' and arranging the interior decoration of their house; says 'Everybody in Cambridge seems to think that this house was made for us'. Refers to the dilapidated condition of the garden, describes his new study, and states that from its window he can see 'across the leafy [ ] of Magdalene.' Reports that Edward Benson has just arrived from Winchester, and says that 'all are well at the [Chancery].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he will come down with Arthur on the 22nd [December]. States that William talks of coming to see him for two days 'on the Saturday'. Declares that his work is over, and that he is 'grinding' at Arabic and ethnology. His friends are 'all coming up from the different schools and it is very jolly'. Replies that she should not get him a ticket for the concert since he does not know if he shall come until the evening. Intends to bring his Arabic home with him. Reports that he has read Prehistoric Man [by Daniel Wilson?], but wasn't very impressed with it, and announces that there are 'some interesting scientific books expected by Lyall and Huxley, bearing on Primæval Man'. States that he looks forward to seeing Miss [Lucy?] Brown.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Has just been with Nora, who has returned from Paris. The 'Secret [of their future marriage] may be now considered altogether public', as Nora has told all her relatives. Tells her that she may tell who she likes. They are going to Nora's brother-in-law's house in Essex [Terling Place, home of John William Strutt, 3rd Baron Rayleigh] the following day, and states that he will probably make that place his 'headquarters' until about 10 January. Will be in London on 4 January for a night, and probably another night in the same week. If his mother has to be in London after 10 January, she will find them all - Nora, Henry, Arthur and Charlotte Sidgwick, H.G. Dakyns and J.A. Symonds - there.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he is making 'a sort of tour of the North-German universities in order to study their system', and that he has spent a couple of days in Bonn and Göttingen, and is now in Leipzig. Notes that the professors to whom he has letters of introduction are all away. Has not yet made up his mind whether the journey was worth it or not, as he claims that he 'could have certainly got most of the information ... out of books catalogues etc.' States that his professors 'are very amiable and obliging, especially in the smaller towns like Bonn and Göttingen'. Refers to the fact that he stayed in Göttingen for two months in 1864. Remarks that although all the professors he visits are 'friendly and communicative', and helpful towards him, the natural habit of a German does not bend to hospitality towards a stranger in [his] position.' Explains that Nora did not accompany him for health reasons. Hopes that his mother has enjoyed her drives, and has been able to get out every day. States that they look forward to going to visit her on 6 August. Sends his love to his Aunt. Refers to an encounter he had with 'an Americanized German', with whom they discussed the difference between the ways of the two nations, as exemplified by warning notices at railway stations.

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