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Trevelyan, Elizabeth (1875-1957) musician, known as Bessie
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry the 'pretty girl' [Hylkia Halbertsma, see 46/100] cannot stay with Elizabeth; wonders if she will have more success elsewhere; wonders whether, when Robert is settled with Madame Palumbo, Elizabeth could visit the Grandmonts at Taormina. Wishes she could have heard the concert [organised by Dolmetsch, see 46/100]; asks whether it was an artistic and financial success. Asks how she got on with the Arnolds; he [Ernest Penrose Arnold] 'had his faults' but both Robert and George owe much to him and his school [Wixenford]. The Arthur Severns have been visiting; she was Ruskin's niece [actually second cousin], and they live at Brantwood. Sir Courtenay Ilbert has also been; his daughters [Olive and Jessie] stayed with C[harles] and M[ary], as did F[rancis Dyke-] Acland and H[ilton] Young. George and Janet return to London on Monday; they want Robert and Elizabeth to dine with them and Caroline on 19 October, with a 'little party afterwards'; they could go to the theatre the night before. Amused by the idea of Elizabeth teaching a class; they are lucky to get her. Hopes [Helen] Fry is recovering; 'wretched for her' to be away from home as well.

Letter from Alphonse Grandmont to R. C. Trevelyan

Taormina. - Apologises for not thanking Trevelyan sooner for sending his poems ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"]: would cover his face if he wore a chlamys or toga; discusses them at length. Has tried to translate the poem about the bat in love with a star ["The Lady's Bat"] and "Fairy Song" but failed, in contrast to Trevelyan's success with Catullus' "Phaselus". Finds some merit in the illustrations [by Roger Fry], and they are in harmony with the text, but feels they lack sincerity. Hopes that Trevelyan's stay at Ravello gave him inspiration. He and Bramine have bought a small house by the sea and invite Trevelyan and Bessie to stay there, or at their room at the Fondo [?] or with them at Rocca Bella.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Glad Julian and Ursula can come on 14 June. Mozzot [sic: Julian and Ursula's cat Maszat] did not 'go on long with her outdoor erotic appeals' and seems 'absorbed in her kittens again'. Wants her to stay, though she occasionally irritates him; he does like her 'when she is not too querulous', but more importantly Bessie is 'very fond of her, and of the kittens'; asks Julian not to tell Bessie he said this. Tet Htoot visited last week with a 'very interesting Chinese friend', and seemed 'much happier and less depressed' than before. John Luce came over for the day yesterday.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

'On the Road! Birmingham [written on 8, Grosvenor Crescent notepaper]. - Glad Elizabeth had a good time at Pen Moel; has met the 'rather astonishing lady [Agnes Macdonald: see 46/101]' and does not know what Meggy [Price] sees in her. Everything lovely at Welcombe and she was sorry to leave, but Sir George is 'longing to be at work again'. Now on her way to the Park [home of Annie Philips]; hopes to be at Wallington by Saturday evening. Glad that Elizabeth has seen the V[aughan] W[illiams]s and that 'all is going pleasantly'; hopes the roof [of the new house] will be on before she and Robert go abroad. Caroline and Sir George dined at the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club and thought it 'very much gone off'; the food and the meeting [?] were both bad. Thinks she will give it up next year; for the cost of the subscription she could have a kitchen maid. Writing at Birmingham station, having seen Sir George off North. He is 'enormously excited about the Russian business' [the Dogger Bank incident]; since he is 'so peaceful generally', his agitation makes her worried about 'what hot headed jingos will do'. If Elizabeth would like to stay at Tunbridge Wells for the Conference, the local secretary Miss Jones is Caroline's friend and would take her in or find her somewhere else to stay; Sophie [Wicksteed] seems very ill; does not think Aunt A[nnie] would like any visitors there in her absence.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

Hotel Cecil, Agra - This is their second day here; will go on to Gwalior on Monday. Had a 'very interesting 5 days at Delhi', and spent a night at Muttra [Mathura], which was the most 'purely Indian' town they have yet seen, on the way; it is 'full of monkeys, and Brahmins bathing in the river, and 'no sign of English anywhere' though there are several regiments stationed nearby. The river and ghats are 'very beautiful'; though they saw 'no fine temples' there, there was a famous old Hindu temple, sacred to Krishna, at nearby Brindaban [Vrindavan], which was the finest he has yet seen. They are having a very pleasant time here; they saw the Taj [Mahal] in the moonlight yesterday, which was more beautiful than he could imagine. Today they saw the buildings in the fort; the Pearl mosque is a 'masterpiece', but the others 'rather disappointing in detail', though the 'general effect is marvellous'. They will visit Fatehpore Sikri at the weekend with William Archer, and [Arthur] Moore, the "Times" correspondent in Persia, whom they have made friends with here. Moore is a liberal, and writes 'telegrams on Persian affairs from the Persian constitutionalist point of view that the "Times" prints and 'then write leading-articles to explain away'. Saw I'timad-ud-Daulah [Ghiyas Beg]'s tomb this afternoon, which is 'a most exquisite building'; [originally] enclosing a photograph of an interior chamber, as well as a view of the Taj. Cannot remember whether his father has been to Agra. After Gwalior, they hope to go to Chhatapur as the guest of the Maharaja, then to Benares, Patna, and should be at Calcutta by Christmas. [He and Dickinson] have not yet decided whether they have time to go to Burma; Forster is with them now, but will leave them at Chhatapur. They cannot go to Jaipur as there is a bad outbreak of plague there, so have 'reluctantly decided' to miss Udaipur and Rajputana completely. Has been keeping well, except for a slight touch of fever at Lahore which the doctor 'stupidly mistook for German measles'; Dickinson is also well. Very glad the ceremony at Stratford 'went off so pleasantly'; returns the cutting of the speech made by his father; if he has another copy, he could send this to Bessie to keep. Has had 'very cheerful letters from her', and expects she is now back from the Netherlands; glad that Julian is 'so well and happy', and hopes he will not 'become too noisy'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - Thanks Bob for his letter. Has already sent on the corrections [for his "History of England"] to Longman's, though they will be too late for a reprint this week. Glad Bob thought 'the Victorian part was tolerable'. The Epilogue was 'imposed' on George by the 'Publisher's view of necessity'; believes this view to be 'correct', but thinks the epilogue 'could not be anything but a blot'. Does not 'understand the age we live' and what he does understand he does not like. Mary is enjoying herself in the Netherlands; George believes 'her attachment will be permanent'. The introductions Bessie gave her 'have made a great difference to her happiness there'.

Postcard from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey; sent to Bessie at 45 Egerton Crescent, London S.W. - Thanks Bessie for sending the 'nice cutting', which was very welcome since she has had nothing from D.F.T. [Donald Tovey] except for a postcard on his arrival [in the Netherlands for his concert tour] on the 9th. Asks if 45 Egerton Crescent has a telephone so Donald could communicate as he passes through London. A 'great blessing' that Julian has recovered well from his operation.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Expects this is the last letter he will write her from Ravello; will start on the 24th, spend some of that day at Pompeii and take the evening express to Florence, arriving next day. Bessie's last account of her 'patient' [her aunt] was better; hopes she may be recovering by the time he reaches the Hague. Has been unlucky with the weather for the last two years but should not complain, as if the weather had not been bad last January he may not have accompanied his brother [George?] to Sicily and met Bessie. In the same way, if the Grandmonts had had a cook at the start of 1896, they would not have dined at the Timeo so he would never have met them and heard of her; he ought to 'like all cooks for that henceforth'. Bessie's quotation from Dante was 'very charming'; asks if she copied it out at Ede before 2 September or after. Encloses a 'little relic' he found in his waistcoat pocket, which he has kissed; she too should 'put the bits [of the railway ticket] together and kiss them' since they brought her and Bob together and made them kiss each other, though she did not kiss him till November, and he kissed her wrist 'a whole month and more before'. Did not sleep well last night as '"that horrible little dog" Gyp (as Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] would say' was barking; Madame [von Wartburg] has the dog safe in her room tonight.

Finishes the letter next day; the weather is lovely, and he almost regrets leaving, but will enjoy a few days in Florence and seeing [Bernard] Berenson; wants to see what he thinks of his last year's poems, and what he has done on this play. He usually likes Bob's work, but not always. Discussion of how no one person can be relied on to say whether something is good or bad. Hopes to see a few pictures at Florence, though does not mean to do much sightseeing. Sorry that Bessie had to miss Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture; thinks she is right that she should not come to England before her aunt is nearly well. Glad that her cousin [Louise Hubrecht] and the Röntgens liked his poems; Bessie is indeed a 'fine advertising agent'. Describes his breakfast here and in England.

Letter from Ralph Vaughan Williams to R. C. Trevelyan

The White Gates. - Has been reading through the '1947 Xmas book' ["From the Shiffolds"]: thinks it a 'very fine collection'; names the poems he particularly likes. Adeline wants him to tell Bob 'how much she likes "Dandelions"'. Bob may have heard that their friend Raynor has been given a hundred pounds by the Musician's Benevolent Fund. They send love to Bessie.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Relieved all well about the measles; does not think it will spread and is glad the little girl [May Enticknap: see 46/174] is getting better. Would very much like to see Julian; expects he will soon be crawling. Mary goes home tomorrow; she has been very good, and much amused her grandfather, with whom she has long conversations. Sidney Lee stayed last night; the Ernest Trevelyans are coming from Oxford on Sunday. C[harles] and M[ary] cannot come till Sunday morning as it is 'the Ministerial ?Amusement'. She and Sir George will go up to town about the 22nd; she has a ticket for Elizabeth for the concert then. Sends her regards if Mrs Hubrecht [wife of Ambrosius Hubrecht?] is still there; had thought it was 'Mrs Jan' staying with Elizabeth. Glad her son's [Jan or Paul?] expedition is interesting. Hopes Mr Carter recovers soon. Sends love to Robert; hopes 'the musician with the striking name [Benvingut Socias i Mercadé, see 46/174] ' is pleasant. 'What praise of Strauss's new opera ["Elektra"]!'. A postscript saying she is glad 'Patterson succeeded'.

Letter from Ralph Vaughan Williams to R. C. Trevelyan

The White Gates. - He and Adeline send thanks for Bob's 'Xmas Poem' ["A Dream"]; has read it twice and is 'getting into it'; does not yet 'follow the end of the whole matter', but a third reading may put him right. Sends his 'latest small thing' [perhaps "England, My England"] in return. Sends love to Bessie. Ursula [Wood] is in 'raptures [?] about her weekends at the Shiffolds'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Arrived safely yesterday, having had a 'delightful afternoon' at Pompeii on the way. Has found [Bernard] Berenson alone; Mrs C. [Mary Costelloe] will not return for a week or two; thinks that he and Berenson are 'making an effort not to squabble on matters of opinion, which is good discipline'. Hopes to hear from Bessie soon; will decide from what she says about her aunt's health how long to stay in Florence. Has not yet seen Miss D. G. [Lina Duff Gordon]; thinks things between them are all right now as 'her letters were quite friendly' and she liked his poem about her pet bat ["The Lady's Bat"]. Is in more difficulty with Mrs Costelloe; must keep on good terms with her if he wants to stay friends with Berenson; mistrusts her gossip and the effect it might have had on Lina. Has not yet shown Berenson his last year's poems and the work on his new play; hopes he will be encouraging. Dined with the Rasponis last night, who are very nice and live opposite in 'a magnificent palace'. Thinks Tuscany 'the finest country in the world'. Had a good time at Ravello, especially towards the end; the Straughns [sic: Strachan-Davidsons?] were 'very good company', though some 'annoying strangers' turned up. Mrs Reid was 'very kind'; wants him and Bessie to come in August or September; he has said that is not for him to decide. Will let Bessie know when he is due to arrive, and make sure he does so in the day so she will not have to get up in the dark to meet him at the station; wonders who will see the other first, as they are both 'as blind as bats'. Will show her the poem about the bat when she comes; it is not 'first class' but 'pretty'. Hopes her aunt continues to get well; would be a great shame if Bessie could not come to England in time to go to Welcombe.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Was at the Deuchars' [Tommy and Dulcie] house yesterday, and met an Australian painter called [Colin] Colahan who lived for some years in Paris and the last three in England; does not know what his painting is like; he seems to be a friend of [George] Bernard Shaw, and has painted him. Will have to register next September, but would like to get into Julian's 'line of business' [camouflage work], which Bob thinks he would be better suited for than the regular army or munitions. He seems to have applied for this some months ago, but has heard nothing since. Julian might advise him who to approach; whether he is a good painter or not, he is 'very intelligent, and has plenty of energy', and seems 'quite a good sort' from an hour's acquaintance. Gives his address at Ockley. Bessie is quite well; [Karl] Bluth has been very ill, though better the last time Bessie rang [his wife] Theo; it is his 'old duodenal trouble'. Has written a few poems, one 'an interpretation in blank verse of an ass's bray'. Hopes Julian and Ursula are well, and that Ursula is 'enlarging her Urceolarian knowledge with her potter friend [Michael Cardew]': urceolus is Latin for 'a little pitcher or water pot'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

36 Chelsea Park Gardens, SW3 [written on Athenaeum headed notepaper]. - Glad that Mary is visiting Bob and Bessie again. Went to Hallington two days ago, since he was lecturing at the Newcastle Lit[erary] and Phil[osophical Society], thinks it is 'a possible place to live in some day' if they had enough money to do so comfortably, with a motorcar 'which would be essential'. It is a 'conceivability in the future' since Mary and H[umphry] are 'fond of Northumberland', but for the moment they have 'two dear old ladies [Sarah and Matilda Spencer] as tenants' who keep the house and grounds in good repair; there is also a good tenant at the Cheviot farm. The 'immediate value of the place is, as always, rather less than appears on paper' due to charges and so on; a third of the net annual amount will go to Bob, as agreed.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear Julian is crawling now; will send a parcel for his birthday soon. Unlucky that Miss [Margaret?] V[aughan] Williams has caught measles; it can be bad in adults. Miss Martin came to Welcombe yesterday; they expect the Runcimans, Janet, and George on Saturday; think Charlie is also coming since he stayed at home with a cold last week. Thinks Elizabeth will like Mrs Walter Rea; glad she has 'such nice neighbours'. She and Sir George move to London on 22 Feb; she will go to the concert on the way from the station, and asks whether Elizabeth will be there. Asks how she liked 'the Spaniard' [Benvingut Socias i Mercadé, see 46/174]. Nice that Julian listens to music.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes the 'invalid' [Thomas Sturge Moore?] is better and can return home soon, though sure he is comfortable at the Mill House; Mrs Moore seemed 'such a nice creature, with her pretty French manners & sweet face'; sure Elizabeth likes helping her. Keen to hear whether Elizabeth got to Tunbridge [for the Conference, see 11/107]; admire her for having canvassed. She herself has had 'urgent telegrams' about a women's meeting in Horsham today; would be wonderful if Erskine won. Sir George is very pleased at [Theodore] Roosevelt's victory. Sir Charles Dalrymple and his daughter have been staying for a couple of nights. Mary's cousin Blanche Stanley has been staying with her, who has a 'lovely soprano voice' and has been well taught. Mary has also got Charles to sing better; they are away now. Sends love to Robert, asks if he would like his "1001 Gems [of Poetry]" to be sent. Looking forward to the play. Asks if Elizabeth would like to have a box of chrysanthemums sent next week, and whether Mrs [Helen] Fry would like some, or Mrs Moore when they get back.

Card from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S. W. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; glad she likes Theodore [as a name for his son]; Jan is 'doing extremely well now'. Is sure that Miss [Ivy] Pretious 'could not get away', but Miss [Mary] Sheepshanks might; gives her address. Miss Sheepshanks 'certainly answers to [Bessie's] description' and is a 'very interesting person with many fine qualities both of mind & character'.

Letter from Oliver Lodge to R. C. Trevelyan

Cad Hill House, Upton-St-Leonards, Glos. - Thanks Bob for the translations from Latin and Greek [this year's "From the Shiffolds"], particularly the "Moretum", which gives an idea of how good Bob's translation of the "Georgics" must be: asks if he ever finished 'that lovely thing'. Asks whether Bob thinks Virgil wrote the "Moretum". The [Homeric] "Hymn to Pan" is 'most beautiful'. The 'news about the Marlowe fragment' ["The Stream"] is 'sensational': it is 'now said to be by Jervis [Gervase] Markham'; the '24 lines seem much the best of those quoted (in the "Times Lit. Sup.)' [see John Crow. "Marlowe Yields to Jervis Markham."" The Times Literary Supplement", 4 Jan. 1947, p. 12]. Is having difficulty writing as three of his children are 'playing rampageously in the room'. Hopes Bessie, Julian, and Ursula are well. Is renting a small house on the edge of the Cotswolds; wishes Bob was within walking distance. Thanks Bob for the gift of "Gebir" [by Walter Savage Landor], which although uneven is a 'noble poem'; is now re-reading Boswell's life of Johnson. Cold and stormy weather, and the normally good views are affected by fog. Was re-reading Bob's translations of Juvenal recently, which are 'perfectly done'; thinks he should translate the sixth "Satire" if he has not already done so. Adds postscript to say Diana would send love if she were not out.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

Hotel de Paris, Benares. - Found his father's letter here when they arrived yesterday, after almost two weeks at Chhatapur as the guests of the Maharajah, a 'very charming and cultivated man'. Stayed longer than planned since [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson was unwell for a few days due to 'indifferent food'. Has been very interesting to observe the governance of a 'native state' which the Maharajah left entirely to the Diwan or chief minister, a Brahmin and a 'very enlightened and able man' who is engaged in reform; they befriended him and the rajah's private secretary who was also chief judge, 'a Moslem and a very fine type, from the Punjab'. Unlike the Punjabi Muslims he had met, he wishes there could be friendship between Muslims and Hindus and believes it would be possible if both sides made 'certain concessions'. They made several expeditions to see temples and palaces while there, and found the countryside more beautiful than anything else they have seen since leaving Bombay, so it perhaps does not matter that they did not as first planned go to Jaipur and Udaipur. Tomorrow they will 'go to see the pilgrims bathing and praying on the Ghats'; [originally] enclosing a photograph of one of the main ghats; the ruined palace in the foreground collapsed about twenty years ago; thinks the other photograph looks 'Italian'. Expects his father saw Benares when he was in India. They will probably go to Goya for two nights on 18 December, then on to Calcutta for a couple of weeks or more before going south to Madras; they may pay a short visit to Darjeeling. They have now given up the plan of going to Burma, for which there is not sufficient time. Bessie seems to have been happy in the Netherlands; expects she will have fetched Julian from Wallington by now; very glad to have had 'such good accounts of him' from her and his parents. Is writing with a champak [flower] bud on his table, whose 'odour perfades [sic] the room, and is worthy of its lyrical fame'.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Glad of a communication from Bessie, as she has long been fond of her and her children; asks if she has been 'decently fair' towards her; Bessie has allowed Donald, whom no-one else apart from Miss Weisse's 'best friend... a dying man' knows as well and to whom she has been 'far more than a mother', to abuse her and has criticised her to him behind her back. Says it does not matter for her sake as her life is 'drawing to its close', but it does that her influence with Donald is therefore 'undermined'; Bessie has 'increased the danger in which he lives as no one else has'. Best to be frank: she is 'German all over in that'. Asks when Bessie expects Donald and his wife [Grettie] and for how long. Wishes them to go and stay with the Trevelyans very much; would be a 'service' to her to keep them as long as they can. Has only really seen Donald's wife once, and 'noticed her so little that [she] would not recognise her in the street'. Has not been in Edinburgh since Donald went to Holland [in January]. The engagement was very short.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to have good news of Bessie and Paul; they look forward to seeing them all soon. Caroline has sent for [E. M. Forster's] "The Longest Journey", and Sir George will read it after his current novel. What Robert says about the Apostles inspires him to send some 'scraps... unearthed' when sifting old letters; Cowell was an 'ideal personage... a man who carried camaraderie to the highest point in [their] set and generation'. [Henry] Jackson persuaded Sir George to 'take over my MA' since the University may someday want a Liberal representative. Has nothing to do, and is very tired after sixteen consecutive months of work, including two of illness; the proofs [of the last volume of "The American Revolution"] will be a pleasure. Sends best wishes to Bertie Russell.

Letter from Alphonse Grandmont to R. C. Trevelyan

Taormina. - Is delighted that Wolfram [von Eschenbach's] Perceval is appreciated by Trevelyan and his friends: he thinks it one of the best medieval chivalric poems, admiring its depiction of character and unity of action, as well as its philosophical and moral scope; encourages Trevelyan to compare the beginning of the first song with the Epistle of St James. He had thought his translation [published 1892] would be read by the French, but thanks to Trevelyan it is the English who buy it. The heavy rains in Sicily, reported in the newspapers, have damaged his houses and spoiled his vegetable, tomato and olive crops, while his grapes have been carried off by rats, lizards and insects since all the neighbouring vineyards have been destroyed by phylloxera. Attempted murder of a young man from Taormina, Ciccia Fallone, by his deserted lover Saredda Bugra: Trevelyan and Bessie will remember them both. Rumour that the end of the world will come tomorrow, so he and Bramine jokingly send all their love.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Has just read Bob's "Meleager" with 'real excitement'; thinks it has 'great power and romance and originality' as well as Bob's usual 'careful artistry'. Supposes Bob invented 'the idea of the ghosts', which is 'very effective'. Glad that Bob brought in the family motto ['Time... trieth troth'] which is the best George knows. Mary much enjoyed her visit to Bob and Bessie at the Shiffolds.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad that Elizabeth has heard of some nurses who may suit her, but sorry that she has this trouble. Good that Julian is so well; she and Sir George hope to visit in October and see him. Thinks [E. M.] Forster must be interesting, since his novels are 'so clever & original', though she does not think he manages plot well. Has been reading [Myra Kelly's] "Little Aliens", about 'the little Jew children in America', which is 'pretty & funny; but quite slight'. Sorry Mr [Donald] Tovey is not progressing quickly, but it must require much work to write the music for an opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]; probably best that it will not be put on next summer, as 'the world will be simply mad over the Coronation'. George's children are 'much improved': Mary has shown no signs of temper; Theo is 'passionate occasionally' but still young, and a 'very nice boy'; [Humphry] seems quite strong now.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad the invalid [Thomas Sturge Moore] has recovered, and that Mrs Moore is such a good friend; hopes he is not 'delicate'. Sir George has sent a hare and duck which he shot himself. Caroline sends part of a letter from Miss Jones and some newspaper reports; asks Elizabeth to destroy Miss Jones's note and return the reports to her at 37 Broadwater Down, Tunbridge Wells. Glad Elizabeth enjoyed the Conference [of the Women's Liberal Associations?]; Mrs [Eva?] McClaren is 'bold' and 'uncompromising', but also 'warmhearted... cultivated' and charming. Knows Mrs [Frances] H[eron] Maxwell from the Westminster Women's Liberal Association; her 'appearance is really terrible' but she is a 'very good woman', most energetic, and 'sympathetic with working women'. Mary wrote a paper on land value and read it at the [Women's Liberal Associations] Conference at Sunderland; Caroline is very pleased they are both interested in the work she likes so much. Sure Maria [Springett] will enjoy making Elizabeth comfortable; Aunt Annie will be at Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] on Friday afternoon. Sir George has been asking how the [building of the new] house is going; perhaps Robert can write about it. Asks when they are going abroad, and whether Elizabeth has found anyone to go with her. Will send flowers on Monday. Hopes Robert's proofs are going well[ for "The Birth of Parsival?]. George's book ["England Under the Stuarts]" is just coming out.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - The Leith Hill hotel is a 'very ideal caravansary' and must bring Robert and Elizabeth good company; glad Sidney Colvin admired Paul; is very keen to see him again. Met Jan [Hubrecht] in the street in London and 'mistook him for Hilton Young... no ill compliment'. Jan said it happened to him 'constantly' at Cambridge. Is halfway through his proofs [of the last volume of "The American Revolution"]; glad they will be alone until it is finished. Staying with them have been: Welby; Tom Brassey and his wife; 'the beautiful Lady Carew'; Lady Reay; Bernard and Mrs Mallet; Alfred Lyall. Is halfway through "Dombey" [Charles Dickens's "Dombey and Son"] and is reading other things such as Beugnot's "Memoirs", placed first in interest by Ferdinand de Rothschild 'the great authority on French memoirs'; Beugnot knew '"at home" the Diamond Necklace gang'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Originally enclosing a letter to Ursula, marked 'urgent'; was going to forward it to the Darwins but changed his mind; Bessie is not coming home till the evening, and he thought he should send it at once. Has been home for a few days after going to Wallington, the [Gordon] Bottomleys and Aunt Annie [Philips]. Tom [Sturge Moore] is back here, but Marie is in London for the time being. Glad Julian will be able to come during his leave. Went to the Sickert show at the National Gallery; there were 'crowds of pictures, some very good' but in general the show at Agnews a few years ago was 'more select' and gave a better idea of him.

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