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Trevelyan, George Macaulay (1876–1962), historian, public educator, and conservationist
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Will not repeat what she has written to Robert about George's engagement; thinks that Elizabeth will find her [Janet Penrose Ward] 'a very nice sister-in-law' and that she will be 'a bright addition to the family'. Would like to discuss this and much more with Elizabeth, but is not sure how this can be arranged; if Mr [Bertrand?] Russell is visiting Elizabeth on Tuesday then she will not be able to visit; she should not travel during Epsom week; then Caroline and Sir George go to Welcombe until 8 June. Will come and visit when they return. Very interesting about the house, but there would have to be 'a very definite understanding; for building always costs more than is expected'. A postscript notes that Mrs W[ard] and Janet are returning, and Caroline will see them on Monday or Tuesday.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Has found the photograph of Julian which she likes, and put it into a frame so she does not lose it again. Asks if Elizabeth knows Lady Bell's reading book ["Pauline's First Reading Book"?]; will send it if not. Asks if she likes teaching; she herself liked reading to the children, but 'never managed to teach them anything'. They hope to get through [to Welcombe] on Wednesday. Hopes Mrs A[bercrombie] is better, and that Elizabeth's nannie returns in better health. Janet and the children are coming on the 9th; there is news of G[eorge], and a 'very interesting letter from Rome'. Annie [Philips] is expecting Robin [Price] for a short stay at Pen Moel; supposes he will go abroad soon. Sends best wishes to Mrs V[aughan] Williams and Margaret, and love to Robert; his 'little "pome" looks nice in print'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Hotel Todi, Thierfehd, Glarus, Switzerland. - Will have to 'break the golden rule' Bob gave him last year, that the person at home should write first to the one abroad. [Charles] Buxton has gone home after their extensive travels together; George is staying for a fortnight's study. Enjoying his best health for a year; describes his daily routine; is reading Homer and Vergil 'in the original at last', and talking with one of his fellow-guests in French, a young lady 'whose heart he has won' by bringing her back some golden lilies from the hills. Has realised 'the horror of distance': would not be able to bear the distance from 'one's country' if it were not for 'swift locomotion'. Often thinks 'the poem of the greatest horror remains to be written': it would describe a man propelled to the moon who can see the earth but is unable to return. Wonders whether Bob is working on his novel at Wallington.; he is very interested to see what his brother will eventually do; is sure he will 'work out his own salvation' and does not want advice, but wishes he would 'take to "one sided" history', that is 'telling the story of some great movement sympathetically, not critically or scientifically'. Is writing another lecture for Cambo about England in the 14th century; much enjoys writing 'for an uncritical audience after Cambridge'. Expects to hear that Charles has been elected [as MP for Lambeth North] tomorrow; thinks Charles's health is now good enough to 'allow of his success in life'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Is sorry that he is so busy that he 'cannot undertake to read Dr [G.J.?] Renier's work [perhaps in relation to Bessie's translation of Fruin's "Siege and Relief of Leyden..."]. Asks whether [Archibald] Flower's purchase of Welcombe includes 'the dingles and little wooded valleys exactly opposite the windows of the large Hall..' which are for him 'the really sacred place, the unspoiled Welcombe where Shakespeare undoubtedly roamed' and bought a tithe. Had always hoped that land would 'not be sold in Villa lots', and Withers said it must go with the house which might otherwise be 'unsaleable'; hopes that it has done so and is not in any danger of being 'cut up for bungalos [sic]'.

Letter from Mary Prestwich to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington. - Had heard about the 'great event [his engagement]' in 'Mr Robert''s letter this morning, as a 'great secret', but thanks him for writing to tell her about it himself. Is very happy, and trusts the marriage will bring them 'great happiness mutually'; thinks from all she has heard of his fiancée that he has made a 'wise choice' for his own happiness, and she hopes for Elizabeth's. Hopes Elizabeth will find 'warm hearts to receive her' when she comes to England. 'Sir George and her Ladyship seem very happy about it; she will be a daughter to them'. She herself hopes that Elizabeth will 'let "Booa" [her family nickname] take her in as a part of you'. Has a 'warm feeling for the Dutch', increased at present by this 'unhappy war [the Second Boer War]'. Glad that Elizabeth is going to 'take you in hand, and try and make you tidy', though she does not know yet 'what a task she is undertaking'. Also glad that, as both Robert and his mother have told her, Elizabeth is 'intellectual, and refined, and accomplished'; he will find that as she herself has 'so often tried to impress upon you... it is not impossible to combine the two qualities (tidiness and intellectuality)'. Will have to 'try and turn out' some of Robert's boxes when he invites her to his new house, or fears Elizabeth will be 'still more shocked'. Will write to Anne [?] and Deane [?]; sure they will be pleased to hear the news.

Very kind of 'Miss Bessie' to say she is looking forward to knowing her; will always be pleased to do whatever she can for either of them. Is going with Robert's mother to Cambridge on Saturday, and will 'take tea with Mr. George on Sunday'; is sorry George will not be at home for Christmas, as she loves to have them all here; perhaps this will happen more when they are married.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - The Sykes-Davieses are coming to lunch on Sunday; has also asked Hugh to let Bob know where the [Apostles] Society will meet on Saturday night; might be a good idea for Bob to attend after dinner here with Janet, since George has to be in London that night at the [British] Academy dinner, though he is free all of Sunday. Sorry that Bessie cannot come.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Has come '4th this fortnight'; Gifford [Giffard?] was 1st. Will try to do better next fortnight; thinks he will be able to now he 'thoroughly know[s] the form'. Charlie 'has not been placed yet'. The 'torpid matches are next Tuesday week' so if convenient she should not come on that day as he would not be able to see much of his. His house 'have a good chance of being cock-house', since they have beaten Haywards and Skipper's, who were considered best. He and Charlie are 'quite well'; hopes his father is. Will write to Georgie soon for his birthday; hopes he is' getting on well in his new form'. The Salvation Army come to Harrow, and 'have meetings in front of Clarke's house'; the boys there 'threw water and other missiles at them, until Vanity [Watson] stopped them'. The weather has been 'very cold' and 'freezing rather hard'.

Letter from Mary Prestwich to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington. - Hears that Robert is home, so is writing to thank him and 'Mrs Robert' for her dress; has had their money for it from his mother; she wore it on Sunday 'for the first time since the 7th' [Robert and Elizabeth's wedding day], and it will always remind her of that day and the week she spent at the Hague. His mother says Robert and Elizabeth are 'both so very busy unpacking and getting straight'; wishes she could help. If she has bought too much linen than Elizabeth needs, asks Robert to say that she herself can use it hear or in London, and pay them for it. Wishes them 'God's richest blessing in [their] new life'. Adds a postscript to say it is the first real day of summer here, and Robert's parents and brother George have gone for 'their long contemplated trip to Wooller [sic: Wooler]'. Hopes Robert will visit soon.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sends belated New Year good wishes. George arrived on Friday from Wales and has been in bed ever since with 'a return of the influenza'; he is now recovering but cannot go abroad this week. Hopes Janet will be able to change the tickets; she is coming this afternoon. Sorry that Julian is troubled with constipation; important not to neglect it, but it will probably go when he can do more 'walking exercise'. Hopes Elizabeth's sister [Mien Röntgen] enjoyed her visit; they had the A[rthur] Sidgwicks and Sidney Lee this week. They have just been watching a tree being cut down; the men are very clever.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Thanks Bessie for her letter [about the sale of Welcombe]; all seems as well as might be hoped; is 'delighted about the Snitterfield folk', and knows Bessie has 'given a great deal of thought and work' to their care. Not surprised that 'Place has turned out well'; had 'good experience of him on the National Trust'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle on Tyne. - Very sorry to hear about [Lascelles] Abercrombie; will send 'F. 25' when Bob asks, but cannot promise more 'as things are uncertain... and calls very many'. Glad they will see Bessie at Wallington in August; hopes Bob will be able to come north in September, and if so that he will come to Hallington.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Heidelberg [on printed notepaper for Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge]. - Bessie's letter and enclosures reached him abroad; he and Mary have had a 'very nice 4 days at the Hague', where he found many letters from Marlborough to Heinsius in the Archives. Janet has joined them now, and they are on their way to Blenheim [Blindheim]. Thanks Bessie for sending the 'old papers'; the one on Pitt was 'not much use', but he is glad to have the 'famous pamphlet' advocating the murder of [Oliver] Cromwell, "Killing No Murder", which he may have bound when he gets home. So, 'it is the last of Welcombe'; hopes it 'won't become a Popery-hole', but everything else is 'most satisfactory'; glad it is 'off [Bessie's] hands'.

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

40 Theatre Road, Calcutta. - Wrote last November but received no reply, so is trying once more: asks if he could recommend a young man to the Master of Trinity [Trevelyan's brother George] for admission next Michaelmas. The usual way is to approach the Master through the High Commissioner, but is afraid that 'our best men do not get places in the good colleges' since these are 'reserved for sons of people who have rendered loyal service to government'. Has know the young man since childhood, and he is the nephew of their mutual friend Apurva Chanda. Had news of Trevelyan from [E.M.] Forster when he was here for the P.E.N. conference. Hopes Bessie and Ursula got the packages of tea and butter he sent from Darjeeling. Enjoyed reading Trevelyan's study of Chinese poetry ["From the Chinese"]. He himself studied Chinese intensively for two years, learning about two thousand characters; unfortunately he is now forgetting them all as the Chinese community in Calcutta diminishes. Has translated the poems of Lee How Chu [Li Yu] with the help of a Chinese poet [Liu Yih-ling]; the book is with a local publisher and he will send a copy when it comes out. Is afraid he may not be able to come over in England as he had planned; only people 'living at Delhi and known to the Viceroy and his councillors' are getting foreign missions and passages. Andriusha [Kalitinsky] and his wife had a daughter last October; longs to meet [Trevelyan's grandson] Philip Erasmus and was very touched by his poem on him.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Always gets the 'greatest pleasure' from Bob's letters about his books, as he thinks Bob is 'perhaps better qualified to judge them as books [emphasised] than any one else' and his corrections and suggestions are always 'so useful and interesting'. Bob's readings of Pope's "Prologue" [to Addison's "Cato"] are 'clearly improvements': George took his text [for "Peace and the Protestant Succession"] from an early copy of the play, but Pope must have made the correcctions Bob gives; discusses Bob's other comments.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Is not on the board of electors for the Italian Professorship [at Cambridge] this time. Has just read the Macmillan selection of Bob's poems with 'very great pleasure'. Hears about Bessie's eye troubles from Janet, and hopes they will be 'spared serious distress'. Notes in a postscript that he keeps dreaming at the moment 'that we three brothers are playing soldiers again on the floor'; he 'always get[s] tremendously excited about it'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Florence. - Is writing before they leave for Rome early tomorrow morning; they have very much enjoyed themselves as there are 'such endless lovely things to see', though the weather has been bad. Glad to hear Elizabeth and Robert have made pleasant arrangements for their winter stay abroad; Elizabeth will be glad not to go as far as Ravello, and 'it cannot be colder!'; hopes she will take warmer clothes with her as there may be a harsh winter. Thinks Florence milder than usual for November. Glad Elizabeth likes the bag; she herself finds one 'a great comfort'. Hopes Elizabeth's 'girl' [a new maid] is doing well, and that Mrs Enticknap likes the idea of training her when Elizabeth and Robert are away. She and Sir George are 'much interested in the political crisis', but she does not think anything will happen for a while. George 'writes in high spirits'; she is glad Elizabeth will see him and Janet; believes Charlie is on a speaking tour. Hopes Elizabeth will see Booa [Mary Prestwich] when she comes up. They can stay at 8 Gro[svenor ] Cr[escent] before they start; there will be 'someone in the kitchen & a man there'. They are excited at going to Rome; they love the art at Florence, but there are 'more and different interests in Rome'. They have not met anyone they know except [Henry] White, the American ambassador, and his wife, who have returned to Rome; will dine with them on Thanksgiving Day next Thursday 'and eat Turkey & Cranberry sauce!'. Has seen in the newspapers that [Joseph] Joachim is 'playing as well as ever'; hopes Elizabeth thinks so. Liked the music when they went to High Mass on Sunday: strings, choir, and occasional organ, 'rather sentimental' but better than in Rome, where she always thinks 'the voices & the organ carry on a sort of contest' as to which can be loudest.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Sorry to hear that Bob has to have 'this troublesome operation', but expects since it is being done in good time it will not be more than troublesome. Hears that the 'Welcombe Hotel' is already advertising; will go and stay a night at some point; thinks it is 'such a good thing'. When in Belgium last week to view the battlefields of Ramillies and Oudenaarde, he visited the Beaux Arts museum in Brussels and found himself 'suddenly and unexpectedly... looking at the Welcombe Memlings of the two donors'; checks whether they are by Memling [the artist is actually Jan Gossaert]. Discovered from someone making a copy that it had been bought by the 'Friends' for the gallery for 'a fabulous sum'; George told him he was glad it was there in its country of origin rather than in America; it looked 'very well'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Glad to hear that [Joseph] Joachim was so nice to her; hopes she also enjoyed her evening with the Piersons. Has talked to his father, who has convinced him that they should invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding, as a relative; admits that it would be strange not to do so in England. Told his father it may cause difficulties with the Grandmonts; but he replied that politics should not enter into the matter. In a way it would be a slight to his father, since he wishes it, not to invite them; he would in that case not come over. Thinks that the Howards would not be 'much in the way' at the wedding, especially as his brothers and parents will be there; does not think him 'a bad fellow, and she, though dull, was quite harmless'; will not deny it would be pleasanter if they did not come. More serious if the Grandmonts really object; understands their feelings, though thinks them 'wrong and unreasonable'; they are among Bessie's best friends and good friends of his too, and it is through them that he and Bessie know each other; would be a great pity if they did not come. Does not think the fact her uncle, who will send the invitations, does not know the Howards is 'essential'. She will have to explain the situation to him; then the Grandmonts should probably be told as soon as possible so that they can make a decision. He or his father could write to her uncle to explain if she prefers.

The marriage conditions are all right; both he and his father will write to her uncle about them. Is going to Cambridge tomorrow and will see Tom Moore; wants to read him the two finished acts of the play. Will probably 'take wings' on Saturday evening: become an 'angel' and 'cease to be an active member of the Society of Apostles'. [Oswald?] Sickert is probably coming to Dorking the Sunday after; has worked well recently, and a few visitors will not make much difference. Sanger is back and seems well again, from the little Bob has seen of him. Has been to the tailors and it is hard to find material of the kind she wants; sends some more patterns, which he thinks will look lighter when made up and were lighter than the ones he wore for Roger [Fry's] wedding. The travelling clock which the servants have given them is very good; there was a note with it in Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s handwriting, which he copies out. Wants to write them a thank-you note, but is unsure how to address it; had better ask his mother.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad Elizabeth has someone to nurse her, and hopes she will now improve and be able to get to the sea. Dreadful weather, with fog and mist; thinks there are floods. Mary is taking her first ride; finds her 'very nice and companionable'; [Humphry] is 'sweet, & still rather pathetic'. Thinks they go home on Saturday as G[eorge] and J[anet] are away for just a fortnight. The 'Kenyons of the BM, the H[enry] Y[ates] T[hompson]s and Nora [Trevelyan]' are coming for next Sunday. Would like to hear Julian say doctor; 'he will have to say 'baby' before long'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Palace Hotel, Rome. - Glad that Elizabeth and Robert have arrived safely at Aulla [home of the Waterfields]. She and Sir George were enjoying themselves and making excursions when Sir George fell, hurt his hip, and is laid up with rheumatism. They were meant to start home on 28 Dec but expects they will have to delay since they cannot travel until he is better. Very disappointed that Charlie has not got a position. Glad Elizabeth has seen G[eorge] and J[anet]; heard they enjoyed their visit; a pity that Janet is pregnant again so soon. Nice to think of Elizabeth and Robert in Italy, though wishes they could meet.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge [notes that his address until 9 Jan will be Hallington Hall, Newcastle on Tyne]. - Has given the Macmillan edition of Bob's "Selected Poems" to A. E. Housman, and quotes from Housman's thanks, in which he admires that 'as usual' there is 'no strain or false intensity or merely external glitter', and thinks that the best poem is "Winter Rain". George sends Christmas wishes to Bob and Bessie.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Thanks Bessie for a 'most delightful weekend' which has 'added something to [his] feeling about life'. Has had a 'good talk' to Hamer [Sam Hield Hamer, secretary of the National Trust?] about Friday Street; Hield will go 'quietly to enquire' and George expects something will come of it.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad Elizabeth is feeling better; thinks she has been 'keeping up too long' and should rest more. The river is flooding all over the fields and the farmers are suffering. Mr Clarke came last night as it is the rent day; they are giving the farmers back 15 % and she has had letters of thanks from many of them. Charlie's treatment seems to be 'bring[ing] out the complaint'. The children go home on Saturday as G[eorge] and J[anet] are not staying on; Mary has been good, and spent a lot of time with Sir George 'over the puzzles'; [Humphry] is 'very sweet & funny'. Worries about Elizabeth being cold if she goes to lodgings [by the sea].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Is very sorry Bessie is 'being given this pain' and there is 'all this unpleasantness' [about inviting Sir Henry Howard to the wedding]; thinks it will all come right in the end. Has spoken to his parents about it; they appreciate her uncle's point of view, though they are 'annoyed at him'. They feel it is 'out of the question' to force her uncle to invite anyone he does not want; however, his father feels it 'impossible to come under the circumstances'; Bob's mother, who is no relation of the Howards, and his brothers will come. His parents have been very kind; his mother is writing a letter to Bessie which she should be able to show her uncle. Does not think it would improve matters if her uncle gave in now. His father is very fond of Bessie, and has been 'extraordinarily kind' to Bob. Bob will come over earlier if she wants him to. Plans to return to Dorking this morning.

Draft [?] letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Winston Churchill

The Shiffolds. - Is sending the Prime Minister a report of a speech given by his father at the Whitefriars Club dinner, about forty years ago, which he recently found amongst his papers. If Churchill has not seen it before, thinks he will be interested in what Sir George Trevelyan said about his father Randolph, for whom Trevelyan thinks his father 'had a real affection as well as admiration'. Sir George once told him how, just after Gladstone brought in his first Home-Rule Bill, he walked away from the House with Lord Randolph; they had to part ways at the bottom of St James's Street but stood there for some time while Lord Randolph gave him a forecast of what would happen. Robert supposes 'his prophecy did not include the Parnell divorce case', but Sir George said practically everything else came true. The Prime Minister knows Robert's brothers, but he expects he will not remember him, though they must have been at Harrow together for some years.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Thanks them for letting him see the letter from Julian; thinks [his European travels, including a trip to Mount Athos] 'just the right thing for him to be doing at this stage in his life'. Asks if they know Geoffrey Young's poem on Mount Athos in "Wind and Hill". Is sending back Julian's letter and Sir George Trevelyan's letters to them both; thanks them for lending the letters and encloses 'proposals for further excerpst' [in his memoir he is writing of his father'. Thinks his visit to the Shiffolds was 'particularly pleasant and memorable'; glad they felt the same; 'the past.. seemed rising around us like a mist and enveloping us'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne (22 miles). - Sad that he has seen so little of Bob and Bessie lately; very sorry that her eyesight is not improving; asks if he may come to see them at the Shiffolds in the Easter vacation and if Bob could stay with him and Janet in Cambridge one weekend next term. A 'real Xmas up here this year, with a hard long frost and snow'; he and Janet are alone, but 'within reach of the cheerful party at Wallington'; suits them as they 'both like to be quiet sometimes'. Janet's eczema is quite better now.

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