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Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Explains his failure to write sooner on a succession of visitors, and the May examination. Presumed that Arthur would give her news of him. Reports that he has very nearly got through his work, and that he intends to be finished it in the next four hours. In relation to his private work reports that marks are to be added up in conclave the following day, followed by a dinner. Intends to go to London on Wednesday or Thursday, and hopes to get rid of his hayfever there. Hopes to find a lodging somewhere near the British Museum, as he wishes to use the library. Does not think he will venture down to Rugby 'until the end of the perilous season.' Reports that he has just heard from Tawney, who is staying in the Bernards' house on the Lake of Geneva, and who is 'bent on matrimonial designs.' He wants Henry to 'go and back him up'. Henry feels inclined to go as it would probably be the last he shall see of Tawney apart from a flying visit to England.

Refers to his health and reports that he feels very well, but that his hayfever causes him some discomfort. Asks his mother to tell Arthur to read Nina Balatka. Does not think that it can be by Trollope, but states that it is 'a very decided and very successful imitation of his manner'. Supposes that she will see William before he goes, and refers to his competition against W. Jackson. Reports that he saw Edward the previous day 'as a D.D.', and states that Mr Martin looks better.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Blames his lack of letter-writing on 'professional engagements'. Remarks on the respect with which he is treated by his pupils. Comments on the swift passage of time, and states that he has got more work than he intended to take, but that he is enjoying it very much, and only regrets that he has not much time for his private reading. Reports that Arthur is happily installed in his [Henry's] old rooms, and is getting accustomed to Cambridge life. States that he is not strong, and will have to take care of himself.

Finds that he has left some letters in a table drawer of the room he was in in her house, and asks her to let him have them, since the Ghost story that his mother sent him was among them, and he wishes to have it with him. Reports that he has heard 'a couple of fresh ones' from an Irish friend of his, and remarks that 'Ireland appears to be a soil in which they flourish well...' States that one of his rooms is 'beautifully cosy', and he knows that it will break his heart to part with it.

Thanks her for her congratulations [on his election as a Fellow of Trinity]. Refers to '[p]oor Donne', who he met 'wandering...between the Station and the College' [a reference to Robert Donne, an unsuccessful candidate for the fellowship and master at Wellington College]; thinks that he is 'safe for the next time'. Sends his love to Edward, and reports that he read a letter of his in print the previous day. Asks her to give his love to his mother if she is there, and to tell her that he will write soon. Reports that Arthur fainted in chapel that day, but tells her not to tell their mother.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Expected to hear how Arthur was getting on - supposes that all has gone well, and that he is at work again. Reports that there is a 'nice little party' at Cambridge, and that everything is very favourable to reading. Declares that he has had to put up Venetian blinds to keep out the heat, which has been quite strong. Reports that Dr Lightfoot has come back from Dauphiné, where he has been with Edward [Benson], who says that they had a most successful tour, 'religiously avoiding every high hill'. Reports that Mr Martin is there in Cambridge, as well as Munro and a chaplain, and Somerset (whom she has met), and Sir George Young, 'and King who devotes his life to Gems'. Intends to stay in Cambridge some time longer - probably until the Fellowship Examination is over.

Asks after William, and whether she has got the house habitable yet. Asks her to tell Arthur that there will probably be five fellowships and that Young is thought to be safe. Reports that according to rumours there will be 'a flood' the following year, 'so they will not give any now to firstyearmen.' Asks how she liked [James Surtees?] Phillpotts, and asks if he gave tongue [a reference to R. S. Surtees' hunting books?]. Asks if she would like him to send her Major Jack Downing's book, but claims that it is not worth reading. Reports that the college is in 'a more reforming humour' than he ever saw it, and claims that 'if two or three old fellows would only be made Deans', they should have some fun soon. Announces that his 'Great Easterns [stocks?] are up again'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Does not yet know when he shall come down to her, but states that it will probably be more than a week and less than a fortnight. Asks if she will have the house ready by the 10th [of October]. Would like to ask his friend Cowell to come for a few days between the 10th and 18th . Reminds her that he was prevented from coming at Easter. Asks her to let him know as soon as possible. Reports that they are assembling again 'in considerable numbers', as the fellowship examination is so close. Refers to the 'bathing accident' [the death of H.J. Purkiss], which was 'a great shock to the college'. In relation to [H.W.?] Eve's resignation of his fellowship, reports that it was supposed in Cambridge to be due to incompatibility of religious opinions. Reports that [William] Everett is there; he did not come by the steamer he intended, and, as a consequence, could not stay with Arthur. Refers to Everett's lectures [On the Cam: Lectures on the University of Cambridge in England], which are to appear soon. Asks if Arthur got *[The Life and Writings of] Major D[owning]'. Hopes he is alright.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Complains that he has not heard from her, and that he saw that she had written to William in Oxford, and was envious. Reports that William looked well, and said that he stood his work pretty well; states that he didn't see much of William, since he was entertaining Professor Fawcett. Asks whether she thinks Lord Houghton worth autographing. Encloses a note of introduction [not included] that he got from him. Announces that he has set his examination papers [for the Moral Sciences Tripos], and is amusing himself with reading Hallam's Middle Ages, which he describes as 'inexpressibly dull'; this is strange, as Hallam is 'clever, enthusiastic, and has a good style'. Complains that it is very difficult to work at that time, as 'everybody is giving dinners at half past seven. Reports that Trevelyan promised to lecture to the Edinburgh people 'on "Impressions of a tour in Greece" and when he got to Corfu he found there was violent quarantine going on everywhere, so he turned tail and went to Austria instead.' Remarks that 'he will have to lecture out of his inner consciousness now.' Mentions that there is talk of a petition against him. Undertakes to bring Colonel Browne's book [the 'Persian MS' referred to in 99/42?] home with him. Doesn't know when he shall come home.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to 'all' [his mother and other family members]

Wishes 'a merry d[ ] and a happy Thingummy' to all, and hopes that they are enjoying themselves 'in the correctest way'. Reports that he is enjoying himself 'as far as a philosopher, whose thoughts are solely of the unconditional, can be said to do so'. Announces that he will be home on Thursday about five, unless he hears from her.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to thank her for the news she sent him, which he received 'with great delight'. Reports that Arthur has come up to read in chapel, and that he [Henry] is beginning to be very busy preparing for the following term. Sends his love to Minnie.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks if she got the books Arthur forwarded for him, and asks her to send them there to Cambridge. Reports that Arthur is very well. Asks her to send his coat also, as it could be useful. Asks her if she knows what is the correct thing for him to wear at a wedding.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Declares that he is very glad to have received the news of the birth [of his niece]. Reports that Arthur is gone down to Rugby that day. Informs her that Whitkirk was given away that day - 'not to Longsdon. A late scholar of much desert [George Moreton Platt] had applied.' Regrets that the family arrangement will fall through. States that he has read his uncle [Christopher]'s pamphlet, which seemed to him 'not deficient in interest or ability'. Does not accept his uncle's assumption of the accuracy of the hints of physical science and ancient history found in Genesis. Relates that he saw that day the Trinity College seal affixed to a legal document for the first time, and had the document read to him. Mentions that he had the pleasure of congratulating Kitchener that day, who tells him that ' "the betting is on Burrows" for Charterhouse.' Refers to an account of 'poor Frederic [F]aber' in the Saturday Review. Undertakes to send Macmillan. Declares that the ' "Competition Wallah" is good this time.' Sends his love to Minnie and Edward, and hopes that the 'house' question will get agreeably settled.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he has just returned to Cambridge. Is glad that she is coming. Confirms that he shall certainly come down on the following Monday with her, 'but probably not for long.' States that he has not seen Arthur yet, and supposes that he has got their mother lodgings.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to thank her for the news, which he says has given him heartfelt gratification [that his cousin Katie Lace is to be married in April, see 101/164]. Is amused by the apologetic tone she assumes, 'as if [he] did not believe in marrying on 300 a year'. Remarks that 'Katie will be a great loss to Stone Gappe'. Tells her to ensure that Arthur answers the following message. States that Hudson wrote to Arthur a few days before the latter left Dresden to ask him to bring home for him 'some articles of Virtue'. Asks whether he received the letter, and if so, 'why the Whewell did not he send the things by Parcel delivery Company. Announces that he is probably coming down at Easter for a day or two but cannot say when. Claims that he can get beds anywhere, however. Declares that [Thomas Jex-?] Blake would take him in if he has forgiven him for sending him to Göttingen, to which destination he [Henry] proposes to send another friend of his the following summer. Reports that there is another charming story in Cornhill for M[ ].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to send the cheque immediately to Cambridge, where he intends to be on Monday. Announces that he is going to stay with Roche Dakyns very early on Thursday. Reports that the house is just being moved there [at Wellington College], and that Edward [Benson] 'is eating breakfast standing with his loins girded' before going 'next to London to order carpets and furniture'. Remarks that the new creature [his niece Maggie] 'seems to [him] as ugly as usual, but the other children are charming.' Reports that he saw the Dakynses at Clifton, and that Graham says his boardinghouse is getting on very nicely. Wishes that he could have seen old friends but his work 'grew harder and harder', and the last day he was up till one o'clock. States that only one day he got a walk of more than half an hour in length [when] Mr Walsh was away. Announces that he is going to be idle now for a bit, and exclaims 'Poor Wilson!'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from London]:- Reports that he has been unexpectedly detained in England, due to Patterson having delayed his arrival in London for two days. Has decided not to go to Heidelberg until the Autumn, and has decided on Berlin as the place of his residence. Announces that Edward Benson has given him introductions to professors there. Reports that he has not heard from Mrs [A ], but he may yet, as his letters from Cambridge have not yet been forwarded on to him. Expresses his wish to visit Heidelberg 'and enjoy the wonderful beauty of the castle', but does not intend to stay there as long as he had at first intended. Hopes that his mother received his parcel 'and found the philosophy soothing and elevating'; and also hopes that she continues with her walking.

Reports that he is now staying with his friend Cowell, 'who is living here now en garçon, as his family are gone to Norway'. Claims to be enjoying himself a good deal. Reports that he went to see Holman Hunt [Hunt's picture, The Finding of Christ in the Temple] again, and maintains that the picture improves every time he goes. Announces that that night he is going 'to witness some spirit rapping'. In relation to poetry, states that he has 'no "[afflatus]" ', and can't write any. Reports that at Cambridge he is considered 'irretrievably donnish.' Reports that there is another book lately published by the ' "[ ] etc" ' Praises the Saturday Review, and predicts that he will miss it in Berlin. Sends his love to William. Asks her to send Arthur's address to him in Berlin.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Admits that it was his own fault that the letters were lost, and only regrets that his mother has had to write again. Reports that his spiritual discoveries 'are rather languishing at present', and that Uncle Robert has sent him a newspaper containing a story about a woman's dream which predicted the death of her son. Admits that he is getting very lazy about his German. Asks her how long she intends to stay at Rugby at Christmas. Refers to the degeneracy of his handwriting. Reports that he has a young American [William Everett] reading with him; 'a very nice fellow though somewhat odd', who has been telling him about America. Refers to the [British] press, which was full of 'those foolishly irritating articles', which he thought would bring on a French war. Mentions that he began to think of emigrating to America when they appeared. Reports that the Rifle-corps [in Cambridge] 'are in high glee because Prince Albert has taken them under this protection', and explains that they 'had been almost wet-blanketed by Lord Hardwicke (our Lord Lieutenant) who refused to grant commissions to under-graduates...' Remarks that they show their patriotism for the drill, 'for the most part at 8 o clock in the morning...' Supposes that [Charles?] Kingsley 'is strong on Riflecorps', and claims that they are all very well except at Cambridge. Sends his love to Edward.

Letter from Nora Sidgwick to Mary Sidgwick

Incomplete. They have got summer at last 'and are even inclined to think it too hot' that day; hopes that Mary has nice weather also. Is particularly glad they have got a fine day since 'the Lewes'' [George Eliot and G. H. Lewes] have been with them since Thursday, as the guests of both Gurney and the Sidgwicks. Remarks on the difference the sun makes to Cambridge, and describes the effect of a summer sunset.

Was rather alarmed at the prospect of having Eliot there: '[o]ne feels beforehand as if she had such a terrible power of analysing ones character - that all ones defects would be more obvious to her than to oneself or anyone else'. However, she is not in reality at all alarming, and 'has an almost exaggerated gentleness of voice and considerateness of manner, and succeeds very quickly in putting one at ones ease'. She talks well, but not so brilliantly as one would expect, 'though she occasionally says good things'. Mr Lewes is an extremely good talker and 'can keep up a conversation for any length of time, and he tells stories well and has a great many of them, and mimics well, but he is not always quite in good taste.' It has been very pleasant having them there, and hopes that they will come again some day.

Admits that she and Henry feel a certain relief to have the house to themselves again after so many visitors. They intend going up to London on the following Thursday, and to stay there for three nights, as Henry's engagements make that necessary, though they may stay at home if he does not finish his book. From London they propose to go to Broadstairs if Isabel is still there. After this their plans become vague.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he arrived at Riddlesden [home of his uncle John Benson Sidgwick] the previous night, and announces that he intends to stay until the following Thursday. Supposes that she is at Rugby again, and asks whether she has begun to remove or not. Asks what Arthur is going to do when the pens are in one house and the paper in the other.

Declares that he did not find things as melancholy at Stone Gappe [home of his uncle Francis Lace and family] as she seemed to expect. Reports that he did not see much of 'any of them' except his uncle. Mentions that Edward was at home, and that he seemed 'a pleasant intelligent fellow; sociable and...weak in character', which things he supposes led him astray in Oxford. Remarks on the lack of confidence apparently between his uncle and cousins. Observes that Robert appears to be troublesome, while Grenfell 'seems a well meaning quiet boy', and intelligent. Reports that they have heard from Algernon, who has arrived at Panmure in British Caffraria [British Kaffraria, Cape Colony, South Africa] 'where Mr Tepson appears to have more or less taken him under his wing.'

States that he heard that '[h]is [Hankets]' are spoilt, but that he had sold a clasp knife and tennis racquet at double their value. Reports that he spent three days at Arncliffe, and that Robert Boyd was there for one of the days. Claimed to have liked his visit, despite it having been 'somewhat "ticklish" to discuss religious and theological subjects with him'. Avoided argument as much as possible. Claims, however, that he liked him as much as ever, and that Mrs Boyd amused him as usual 'by her rough geniality and uncompromising practicality.' Announces that William [Boyd] is to be married in November, and that 'his business (in which Robert is a [banner]) seems to be prospering.' Announces that he shall see his Aunt Henrietta at Leeds.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Confirms that the box arrived. Regrets to hear that she is not yet recovered; he did not realise how ill she was, probably because she was doing so much, but declares that he ought to have known her better by this time. Is glad that she thinks that Martin [Benson] is like him, and hopes that he will turn out better; says he thinks a 'tide' in his own affairs, a few years ago, might have 'led [him] to greatness' had he taken it and hopes Martin may 'have as good opportunities and make more use of them'. Remarks that Martin surprised him by the extent to which he appreciated things, but thought that he had 'less character than Arthur', which may also be true of Henry himself when he is compared with either of his brothers.

Refers to Dr [Rowland] Williams, and admits to have been impressed with 'his courteous deference to the opinions of those who were arguing with him, and his candour'. Reports that Cowell has slight disease of the lungs, but states that the dangerous part of the ailment is the heart, which his father believes that he cannot get over. Of his pupil Lord Lorne, remarks that he is not very intellectual, but very charming. Reports that he did not see any more of 'the young ladies' of whom his mother speaks. Tells her to dismiss the notion that she may have had that he was 'making love to one of them.' Declares that his is studying Metaphysics, which is 'very absorbing', but bad for the digestion. Confirms that he knows Carlos Smith slightly, and states that he is a very accomplished man. Informs her that 'he plays beautifully on the piano and knows six languages.' Reports that he stayed two days with his friend Noel, who is also 'absorbed in Metaphysics'. Says he knows nothing about Ecce homo [by J. R. Seeley, published anonymously] but reports that everyone there speaks highly of it; had decided not to read it after seeing a review, but realises he will have to. Expresses his extreme regret at hearing about Tryphosa [Lace, his cousin].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Glad to hear such a good account of her, and hopes that she is not thrown back by the frost. Complains about the frost in Cambridge, but states that he has had no cold. Tells her not to believe any reports that he has had an attack of the gout; reports that he has 'slightly disordered [his] system by metaphysics and neglect of exercise', and was 'obliged to lie up with an inflamed ankle in consequence'. Intends to do his six miles 'devoutly' in future. Does not know 'any book of sound information' to recommend to her. Asks if she has tried 'Palgrave's Arabia'[Personal Narrative of a Year's Journey through Central and Eastern Arabia (1862-1863)]. Asks whether she cares for novels; says that Mrs Oliphant's Agnes is worth reading. Says that it would interest him much sometime to read his old letters [as his mother suggests, see 101/170] but at present would dread it as 'there would be too many "ghosts of buried plans and phantom hopes" assembled there.'

Maintains that Ecce homo [recently published, anonymously, by J. R. Seeley] is a great work, but does not find the author's method satisfactory, 'because he passes so lightly over critical questions'. Finds the second part 'surprisingly powerful and absorbing'. The book has 'made a great sensation here. The author keeps his secret'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

In relation to Easter, states that his plans are uncertain. Is glad that she is interested in [William] Lecky. Gives his thoughts on reading and thinking; believes that 'it is not so easy as people think to choose reading that really sets the mind to work and makes it grow'; however, since everyone is 'always... much "involved in matter' as Aristotle says', the world and our 'little petty interests are "too much with us", and anything that lifts us out of them is a gain'. The ability to be thus lifted is something he much values in people; it is not proportionate to talent - intellect viewed as an instrument'. Arthur Butler has it, and it is one of the things Henry likes in [E. A?]. Scott.

Remarks that his mother has not written to him lately, and that they have 'in a sort of way dropped out of correspondence'. Claims that it was not he who objects to gossip; asserts that he has always maintained that 'it was the only way most people [had] of exercising their minds really, originally, on moral and social questions'. Says he is certainly interested in the Ritchies [the family of William Ritchie]; wishes that his mother could see them 'and ascertain whether the interest is due to [his] very limited acquaintance with (feminine) human nature'; has met many families but 'never... with one that took [his] fancy like this'. Asks what she thinks of Mrs Gretton; thinks that she must be livelier than most Rugby people, but that 'she is to be taken "cum grano" '.

Reports that Macmillan won't say who wrote Ecce Homo [recently published anonymously by J. R. Seeley], but has promised sometime to ask twenty people to dinner including Henry and the author. Reports that Gladstone wrote to Macmillan 'a letter acknowledging a presented copy and calling it a "noble book".' Relates that some of the 'younger men', such as Myers, are 'tremendously stirred by it', but that Henry is 'not quite in the same way'; quotes Carlyle saying that 'man and his universe are eternally divine', and adds that the author of Ecce Homo 'means us to go further and credit what is now to us incredible. He may be right'.

Expresses surprise at Mrs Gretton preferring the eldest Miss Ritchie [Augusta], and declares that he does also, although he does not think most people would. Refers also to the second Miss Ritchie [Blanche], 'Cornish's betrothed', as 'more unworldly perhaps.' Declares that when he comes across girls who interest him he uses his opportunities with considerable eagerness, 'because they are necessarily so few.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces his intention of coming down 'about the middle of passion week', from Wellington College, but states that he cannot quite fix his movements, as he wants to be in Cambridge to inaugurate the new master [of Trinity]. Reports that there was relief at the appointment, as there was fear that it would be a non-resident. Declares that Thompson 'will make a very good sort of master, though not perhaps the best' as he is 'a little too lazy or dyspeptic'. Claims that they expect further changes in the College, 'as it is thought Mathison will take a living', but that they won't make Henry tutor.

Informs her that he shall not bring any friend with him as he prefers the domestic circle when at home, and will stay over Easter Sunday if his mother has room for him. Confirms that he is interested in the ' "grammar question" ', and strongly believes that the language should be taught to boys 'without making them learn by heart a syntax in Latin.' Looks forward to seeing his uncle Robert, but does not wish to talk about theological questions [with him]. He is willing to talk about 'any amount' of politics or philosophy, however. States that he has not forgotten about the poems, but cannot find the book. Undertakes to buy another one if he cannot find it, and send it to her. Expresses regret in relation to his mother's health, and hopes to see 'them in a week or so.' Refers to the fact that Edward [Benson] is not well, and that 'he seems a good deal worried about new masters'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he saw Arthur. Refers to William's speech at Manchester; that 'the Manchester people printed him as the Revd. Dr Sedgwick Master of Merton and how the Conservative weekly took him to task for so impudent and conceited an imposition.' Claims that it was a malicious article.

States that they are in a considerable state of agitation there [in Trinity College] 'as all sorts of projects of reform are coming to the surface, partly in consequence of having a new Master [W. H. Thompson]...partly from a hope...that Mathison was going to take himself off.' Admits that there is much that need alteration, but is grateful that there is also 'very little of what Carlyle calls hide-bound Toryism.' Reports that an investment of his is turning out very badly. Remarks that the Italians seem bent on war, and if they do go to war he fears that they won't pay the interest on their enormous debt. He believes that such a situation would result in his losing £50 per annum from his income.

Is still undecided about whether to go abroad that year or to stay in England and read philosophy. Announces that there are several visits that he wants to pay in the latter half of July 'to schoolmasters and others.' Speculates that he 'may be decided to go abroad by the fact of a European war'. Declares that he has never been even on the skirts of a campaign; he came after one at Solferino, 'and even that was exciting enough.' Asks his mother to write, if only to say that she has received Ionica [the anthology by William Johnson (Cory)].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Does not think that he shall come to Rugby before the end of 'the half.' Believes that his hay fever will not leave him before the end of July, and does not think that he will go anywhere until it clears up. Intends to stay in Cambridge and study, and if unwell, to 'fly off to the seaside.' Says that he studies best in vacation time, not simply because there is more time, but also because he has a 'restive imagination' which he cannot 'harness' when his mind is 'filled with all manner of College and University matters'.

Wishes to visit his schoolmaster friends at Eton, Harrow, and so on, towards the end of July. Asks if she has heard lately about Tryphosa [Lace, his cousin]. Does not quite understand what she will do by going to see her. Asks how his uncle [Francis] feels about it. Reports that the Donisthorpes are there [in Cambridge], but claims that he has been so busy that he has hardly been able to see anything of them. Remarks that he thinks 'the youth' [Wentworth] is clever.

Can tell Mrs Gretton amuses his mother, and remarks that he likes people who are unlike other people in their ways. Agrees with his mother about 'the '"foreignness" of [Mrs Gretton's] manière d'être' but observes that 'it is not only in the "sunny south" one finds that expansiveness', adding that the Germans have a good deal of it; sometimes thinks it is the 'more natural state' than English reserve, but says that 'when it is affected it is very odious'. Declares that he likes [Charles Kegan?] Paul very much. States that he finds that he has lost his paper about the Arundel Portfolios.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that his hay fever has improved somewhat, so he can 'behold the face of nature without sneezing therein'. but that he does not intend to travel immediately. Intends to be 'hanging about London' towards the end of July, 'seeing the Academy, going to Eton, examining at Harrow and so on.' Announces that he will go to the Lakes with Trevelyan on 10 August for a short time. Asks his mother to inform him of what she is doing, and of her plans. Undertakes to come to visit her in the autumn; 'the latter part of September.' States that he is 'reading now pretty hard, and very much enjoying the complete freedom and leisure. Reports on the cleaning and painting and possible gilding of their Hall, which activities are being carried out under the 'civilizing influence' of the new Master [W. H. Thompson]. Announces that they are 'actually going to dine on chairs' after the vacation. Remarks that 'Mr. Martin unwillingly yielded to the irresistible tendency of the age of luxuriousness.'

Reports that the Italian [funds] are maintaining themselves, much to his surprise, and that his speculations have not been very successful, but he is better off than certain of his friends who 'put into certain banks.' Refers to the '[inquiry] inflicted by the ruin of Agra and Masterman's bank'. Asks her to tell Arthur that he is sending him a set of papers that Roche Dakyns forwarded to him. Hears that William is still in Oxford, writing. Wishes that he himself was writing, and intends to begin very soon. Reports that 'Trevelyan has some fresh book on hand.' States that they have 'taken rather a fit of writing at Cambridge'; that two or three of his friends have got books on hand. Announces the presence of a poetess in Cambridge: Mrs Webster, who has 'just translated the Prometheus of Aeschylus rather well', and of two or three novelists; 'one writer in the Times, two in the Saturday Review etc etc.' Refers to the fact that Lord Derby 'is to be Premier', and laments that his own chance of 'getting anything good has gone by'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Grange in Borrowdale]:- Regrets to report that Cowell is not coming to visit, and announces that he himself does not intend to come home until the end of the month, as he finds it more convenient to go to Cambridge first; will come home for the first week in October. Reports that the weather has been very good, and that they [he and G. O. Trevelyan] have been up Causey Pike and Dale-Head. Praises the 'wonderful variety' in the countryside where they are climbing, and mentions Buttermere Haws. Thanks her for the receipts. Reports that they have decided henceforward to avoid beefribs. Declares that the house in which he is staying is very comfortable, and remarks on the fact of it having two sitting-rooms.

Expresses his delight at hearing a good account of William, and asks if the Dakynses have 'gone to join them [William and Arthur] at Pontresina'. Reports that he has not seen any of the Rugby people, and declares it to be too much of an expedition to go to Grasmere and back in a day. Remarks that it is odd to hear of hot weather, as there they discuss whether to have fires in the evening or not. Claims that to him the temperature is 'perfectly charming.' Announces that he will leave on 1 September and go into Dorsetshire. Intends to see Furness Abbey on the way. Complains that it is a very long journey, and that he almost wishes now that he had not promised to pay the visit. Asks if she saw about Professor Grote's death, and declares that he shall miss him at Cambridge.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Grange in Borrowdale]:- Reports that he has been there since Friday, and that the place is 'wonderfully well situated. Praises the view from the front of the house, referring to the Lake [Derwentwater and Skiddaw. Reports that he went up Latrigg on Saturday morning before Trevelyan came, 'and got splendid views'. Implies that he does not believe their 'third man' [Edward Young? see 99/70] to be ill, and suggests that he is detained 'by a more romantic reason.' Refers to the extreme cold, and complains about the food. States that he is 'going in for French belles letters in the evening and German philosophy in the morning', and reports that 'Trevelyan is relaxing from the cares of statesmanship.' Sends the latter's greetings to his mother. Claims to be very happy at seeing Derwentwater again, but thinks that perhaps some of the Grasmere scenery is superior. Remarks on the 'crowd of little hills between [Keswick] and Buttermere. Announces that he will go to Wastdale Head during his visit, though so far it has been raining ther. Asks whether she ever read a book called 'The Initials [by Jemima von Tautphoeus], and states that it would give her a good idea of German life such as he has seen it. Remarks that the accent of the people in the area in which he is staying reminds him 'more than anything of the Laces' [his uncle Francis and family].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that on the following Tuesday he goes to Germany, and states that he hopes that he shall not return until he can speak German fluently. Undertakes not to read any English, apart from her letters and the Times, and to speak it as little as possible. Asks her to tell Edward that he shall be in London from Friday until Tuesday morning, staying with J. J. Cowell in Hyde Park, and that he expects a visit from him. Explains that he wishes to see some friends who are going up for the Eton and Harrow match at Lords. Reports that he heard on Monday from their mother, who 'is with William at Beddgelert without Books', and states that he sent Whewell's Plato to her. Remarks that she seems to be enjoying herself. Regrets that he could not have gone down to visit his aunt Henrietta before he went abroad. Reports that he read through 'the famous Leiden [des jungen] Werthers [by Goethe]' the other day, which, he claims, he could not put down until he finished it. States that he has begun on Jean Paul, but finds him very hard. Undertakes to write from abroad. Sends his love to Edward.

Letter from Nora and Henry Sidgwick to Mary Sidgwick

Admits to being a very bad correspondent; asks whether Henry has written to Mary. Reports that he is very busy with lectures and with organising the women's lectures 'and seeing that everybody gets taught what they want to learn'; he is also writing an essay for Mind. She is working at mathematics again with Mr Ferrers, and enjoying it very much; she is to have one or two pupils from Newnham Hall for Algebra. Reports that Miss Clough and several students at Newnham and their servants have become ill, probably from eating some unwholesome fish, but the doctor says that they will recover. Ellen Crofts has come back to the college, and Charlotte's sister Edith is also there. Edward Benson is coming to Cambridge on the following Friday, as he has to preach the commemoration sermon on the Sunday. Discusses Dr Slade and his seances, and the suspicions surrounding him, and refers to Professor Lankaster's evidence, which 'remains very strong in support of the trickery thing.'

Note from Henry Sidgwick to his mother, saying that both he and Nora 'have both been a good deal fussed about different matters', but that everything is sorted out now. Could almost believe that he had lived years in his house, which is exactly the sort of home they wanted. It is unlike what he thought of whenever he thought of living domestically in Cambridge; that he had always imagined himself 'in a semi-detached villa on the road to the railway station, exactly like twelve other semi-detached villas', but that the great feature of his present home is 'its Individuality.' Undertakes to send his own letter the following day.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Explains that his delay in writing is due to the unsettled state of his plans. Reports that he has been staying in lodgings in Berlin for nearly a fortnight, and has to change his plans so that he will spend only a short time at the end of the Long [Vacation] travelling. Announces also that he has been obliged to separate from Patterson, who has to return to England earlier than he does. Admits that he has not studied much German as yet, but undertakes to work really hard at it when he goes to stay with a family. Professes to liking the town of Berlin very much, and to having great admiration for Germany. Does not believe that the Prussian policy or the real position of Prussia in Germany is generally understood in England.

Explains his delay in finding a family to live with as being due to two of the three professors to whom he had letters of introduction from E. W. Benson were away, and the third, Dr Wiese, was 'either too busy or unable to assist [him].' Professor H[errig], when he returned, found a residence and instructor for Henry for six weeks. He is lodging with a Dr Lüdde-Neurath, and undertakes to send the full address soon. Reports that he travelled to Berlin via Antwerp, Aix, Hanover and Magdeburg, and at the latter witnessed the ceremony of the Greater Relics and bought some commemorative medals. Remarks on the cathedral there, where he saw the relics. Reports that he had a bad bout of hayfever in Aix, and so chose to go to Hanover by night. Crossed the Rhine at Dusseldorf. Describes the new part of Hanover as 'a very nice town', and his visit to the palace where he saw the portraits of the Four Georges. Sends his love to Minnie and Edward.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from C. Kegan Paul's home]:- Reports that he is playing chess with Cowell , and is enjoying himself as much as he can in the rain, which has prevented him from seeing much of the scenery or places of general interest in the neighbourhood. Declares that he has been promised a visit to Corfe Castle. Announces that he returns to Cambridge on the following Saturday 'to read hard for a fortnight if possible'; criticises his own idleness and lack of 'resolution', saying this is the 'second Long Vacation [he has] frittered away pursuing study as a vain shadow".

Refers to his time spent at the Lakes, the enjoyment of which was overshadowed by the death of 'poor B. Young'. States that Edward Young was one of their party; he was 'in rather bad health', and 'got a few agonized lines from George.' Wonders as to the imprudence of the expedition, with regard to accidents; remarks that one only hears of Englishmen and Russians being killed, and not Germans and Frenchmen. Returns to the subject of the book Initials [by Jemima von Tautphoeus] which, he believes, is a caricature. Confirms that he will see her in the beginning of October. Asks her to send his greetings to the Ch[ ], and to give his love to Fanny Green if she sees her.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

States that he has been at Trinity College about a week, trying to write an article, but claims that he has been ill and shall probably be delayed. Does not think that solitary life agrees with his constitution, but clings to it because he believes that it helps him to concentrate his mind. Declares that he enjoyed his holiday very much, 'particularly the three weeks at the Lake [with G. O. Trevelyan and Edward Young].' Remarks that although he was happy in Dorsetshire, 'it was very melancholy being with poor Cowell', who is quite ill.

Reminds his mother of her invitation to [Charles Kegan] Paul to come to Rugby, and announces that he has asked him to come the following Easter. Does not know whether he will bring Mrs Paul or not. Asks her to send a volume of Fichte, and any books with library marks on them. Hopes to come to visit her on 3 October for a week. Explains that that is the day the Union Library opens and he wants to get some books 'before the country clergy have gone off with them all. Announces that it is thought that J. B. Mayor will be the new Professor of Moral Philosophy.

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