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Trevelyan, George Macaulay (1876–1962), historian, public educator, and conservationist
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Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Glad Bessie likes Veronica Wedgwood's "William [the Silent]". Bertie Russell is currently living at the Clifton Place Hotel, Sidmouth with his wife and son , who has not been well but is now recovering. Russell himself will be at Trinity for three nights this week, but George advises Bessie to write to Sidmouth since the posts are slow. Very much interested in Ralph Vaughan Williams' offer [of Leith Hill Place] to the National Trust.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne (22 miles). - Agrees that 'things seem to be going better in the Wallington family' [see 14/138]; Molly is 'very grateful' to Bob. Discussed Bob's 'kind suggestion' about the classics books which used to belong to Macaulay with Charles last night: both think the idea that they should go to Trinity or Wallington 'excellent', and that Trinity would be best 'as more classical scholars will always be assembled there': Macaulay's journals, which George has given to Trinity, have 'already been much studied there'. Otherwise Wallington in the hands of the N.T. [National Trust] would be a 'permanent resting place'. Asks if he may discuss Bob's suggestion of leaving the Greek classics to Humphry for his life with Humphry when he visits in a few days.

Letter from John Luce to R.C. Trevelyan

King's College Cambridge. - Thanks Trevelyan for letting him know about the "Abinger Chronicle", to which he will subscribe for at least six months. The [Apostles'] Society has met for the last time this term, probably for the duration of the war. [Matthew?] Hodgart has been called up: he read a very good paper on 'Truth' from the Marxist angle, at the meeting when Wallich and Hobsbawm were elected; G. M. Trevelyan was there, in fine form. Now only Luce, Champernowne and the two 'newly-born' are left: Andreas Mayor is training for the infantry; Wilfrid Noyce is the only active member of the society to object, and with a Quaker ambulance in Birmingham; Oliver Kisch is working for his final law exam in London and waiting for a commission in the Tanks. A postscript records that he has met [Hugh] Sykes Davies in a pub, who took him to a far corner to talk 'sedition'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Thinks things are going well about [Charles's son] George, thanks to Bob's 'most kind intervention'. Both Georges wrote to Moll, and she has 'played up' and almost certainly persuaded Charles to postpone the announcement [about his intention to leave Wallington to the National Trust] until the Tenants' Party on 1 August, and to write a 'nice letter' to his son inviting him for next weekend. This change of plan is good as regards the tenants, who 'ought not to read of [Charles's intentions] first in the papers'. Best not to mention it to anyone else; only a few NT officials will know there has been any postponement. Thanks Bob again for what he did.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Greatly values Bessie's approval of his autobiography; several of his friends and relations have told him it should be longer, but he notes Bessie's 'literary sense causes [her] to suspend judgement on that point'. Friends and relations are always more interested in 'one's very mild adventures in life' than the general public; has 'said all about [himself that he thinks] the public has a right to know or would wish to know'. Glad they had Dr Bluth to see Janet; not sure whether the tablets he has given will make a 'marked improvement', but it is good to know that 'so great a specialist as he' agrees with their Dr Simpson; they 'both thought highly of each other'. Adds a handwritten postscript to say that his 'admission to shout in the School Choir' was 'by favour (of Sandilands [his head of house]) not by merit!!'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne. - Has talked to Humphry: thinks they both feel that if Bob would like to leave the Greek classics [books which once belonged to Macaulay] to Humphry for his life, it would be much appreciated it. If Humphry ever became unable to house the books, he would make them over to Trinity at once, or Wallington if Bob decided that way, otherwise they would go there on his death [see also 14/137].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad Elizabeth had a good time with the Röntgens; hopes [Julius] was satisfied with his concert. Asks if Robert will be back with her soon; hears George comes tomorrow. The three children [Pauline, George and Kitty?] came yesterday and have gone to John Middleton's birthday party. Would like to hear Julian tell his experiences; Booa [Mary Prestwich] says he told her most about the Ship Canal. Delighted about the Dutch elections and congratulates Elizabeth; hopes things will be much better now. Has had a busy morning with wages, accounts and so on; Grace has not yet left, but Caroline thinks she will soon go to Buxton. Sir George sends his love; he likes having the children, who are behaving well, here. Was interested in [Goldsworthy] L[owes] Dickinson's letter.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Elizabeth's 'dear letter' arrived this morning, and Sir George is very pleased with Robert's; is sure Elizabeth will like Janet, who is 'a very genuine person'. Sent the telegram as she thought Elizabeth might be able to come tomorrow and wants to talk to her very much about the house and the engagement. Very busy today, with Aunt Annie [Philips] in the morning, then a meeting, then Mrs Ward and Janet. Going to Welcombe on Wednesday afternoon; are planning to tell 'relatives and near friends [sic]' about George's engagement, but keep it 'as quiet as possible' until nearer the time of his return on 16 June. Is pleased to have 'another daughter' but Elizabeth 'will always be the one that came to [her] first'. Postscript to say Janet wants to get to know Elizabeth and Robert, which Caroline will arrange on her return, and giving her address. An enclosure was brought by C[harles] from Turkey.

Postcard from George Macaulay Trevelyan to [R.C.?] Trevelyan

Hotels Seiler, Zermatt; addressed to Trevelyan, 8 Grosvenor Crescent, London. - Describes his room looking out on the Mattherhorn and his reading matter; will be here for about a week until [Charles] Buxton leaves, when 'shouldering [his] rugsack [sic]' he will 'plunge into the unknown'. This is a 'nobler place' than he could ever have dreamt of. Is preparing a letter.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

[headed notepaper] Secretary for Scotland, Dover House, Whitehall. - Robert and Charles must make themselves warm and comfortable at Bournemouth, for which he and Caroline will pay, and Robert must 'make it a duty' to get and stay well; it is important that he should be a 'useful man' and spare his mother any worry, as she is not strong and Sir George is 'far from easy about her'. They are very busy; the House [of Commons] was 'almost a hospital' last night with so many members ill. Asks if Robert or Charles knows anything about the large guide to the National Gallery which should be on the back drawing room shelf; thinks George may have had it.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Darjeeling. - They have been here three nights, and are leaving this afternoon; they have had fairly good weather, and have 'seen the mountains quite well'. Originally enclosing a photograph, though this gives 'very little idea'; the scenery is 'much vaster than anything in Europe'. They will be met at Sara [?] on the Ganges by 'young [Nagendranath?] Ganguli', son-in-law of one of the Tagores, who will take them in his steam launch to the Tagore country house, where he is an estate manager. They will spend a night there, the next in Calcutta, then start south on 8 January, reaching Madras on the 10th; they plan to stay about a week, before spending around three weeks seeing South India and Ceylon [Sri Lanka] and leaving Columbo for Java on 7 or 8 February. Very glad to hear his family are all well; expects his parents are still at Wallington, but that Julian has gone home. Is 'amusing' himself learning Persian in order to be able to read the poetry; it is 'not a difficult language, except for the alphabet'. Glad to hear that Robin Mayor is 'really married' [to Katherine Beatrice Meinertzhagen]. Does not seem to be much news lately from Europe; supposes that 'the Turks will come to terms soon' [First Balkan War]; the [British] government seems 'to be getting on quite well now'. They just missed 'Montague' [sic: Edwin Samuel Montagu, secretary of state for India] at Benares; he seems to have 'made a fairly good impression' at Calcutta, and at least 'seems anxious to learn'.

Hears the Christmas tree was 'a great success'. Bessie says Julian's Nannie is 'fairly cheerful', which is good; of course she thinks Booa [Mary Prestwich] 'spoils Julian'. Bessie thinks Julian is getting on well and is 'usually quite easy to manage'. He and Dickinson have had a 'very interesting time' at Calcutta; not likely to meet 'so many clever and entertaining Indians elsewhere'. Will be glad to leave India and get to Java. Their plans about China and Japan are still 'unsettled'. He wants to get back early in May if possible. Everyone in Calcutta has read George's 'Garibaldi books', but he doubts this 'will produce a Bengali Garabaldi [sic]'. 'Mazini [sic: Mazzini] is more of their kind... the young men seem to have a great admiration of him'.

Notebook with draft of R. C. Trevelyan's translation of Sophocles' "Philoctetes", with letter from G. M. Trevelyan

Letter, 23 Feb 1949, from G. M. Trevelyan, The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Is very sorry he will not be able to put Bob up on 1 March: the doctor has said that due to Janet's 'various complications with dentists, etc., on top of her other infirmities' she should not be troubled with house guests for a while. They will of course be able to see Bob, and he hopes they can give him lunch on Wednesday. Sends love to Bessie. Translation by R. C. Trevelyan of Sophocles "Philoctetes" 54-59.

Book contains: part of an essay by R. C. Trevelyan about the self (1-2); thoughts on memory and old age (3); part of dialogue between Thersites and a "Poet", discussing 'rebellious products and portions of your imagination' (4v).

From the other end of the book: translation of "Philoctetes" by Trevelyan up to line 53; loose sheets inserted with translation of the play to line 114.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Athenaeum, Pall Mall, S.W.1. - Good of Bessie to tell him 'so fully about Bob'; glad he now has the nurses to look after him. Thought when he saw Bob at Cambridge that 'at his best it was remarkable how clear and good his mind was on literature, even when vague on other things'. Is glad to have had that time with him.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne. - Glad that he will see Bob so soon. Advice on Lake District hotels: has heard that the Anglers Inn at Ennerdale has changed for the worse; the Richardsons are now at Gatesgarth Farm, which used to be the Nelsons', they take in visitors and he believes 'do them quite well' - he is now their landlord and has put in a bath and indoor W.C.; old Nelson's daughter, who is 'very nice', also takes in visitors at Gatesgarth Cottage. Suggests Bob mentions that he is George's brother if he writes or wires them. Also two good hotels in Langdale: Fothergill's New Dungeon Gill [sic: Ghyll], and the Old Dungeon Ghyll at the head of the valley.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Is glad Bob likes the 'little book' ["The English Revolution, 1688–1698"]; he is right that George has 'kept off the "high lights"'; this is deliberate, both because there is not enough room to develop them here and in order 'not to attempt to rival Macaulay'. Knows any attempt would be a failure, and was keen 'to strike a different note from Macaulay, to secure confidence for [his] general views, which... are not really very different from Macaulay's after all' since he was right on the 'big impersonal issues'. Is very concerned about [Clifford] Allen: hopes Switzerland will give him some happiness and health. Glad to have better news about Bessie.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle- on-Tyne. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; has written to [Herbert Mayow] Adams, the Trinity Librarian, asking him to communicate with her, though he may be on holiday and thus not able to write at once. Very glad Humphry is going to act as [Bob's] unofficial literary executor; is sure he will do it well. Sorry that Bessie's arthritis has been causing her pain; Janet has no pain but is 'dreadfully incapacitated'. Would much like 'the "homely" photo of Bob'. They do not come south until 16 October.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle- on-Tyne. - The photograph [of Bob, see 13/141] is 'lovely - most characteristic in every way'; is very glad to have it; also interested in what she says about the woods. Very sorry to hear that her arthritis is 'making progress' and that she may leave the Shiffolds. Notes in a postscript that Janet sends her love.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland]: - Thanks his mother for her letter. Is sorry that he has not written earlier; has been working hard this fortnight to 'come out high' in his form. Charlie has 'done very well' and come twelfth, gaining a place. Robert won the 'carrying race', mainly as he was drawn with Stephenson, who is 'nearly the lightest' in their house; they each get two shillings. Thinks he also gets something for being third in the half mile, but is not sure. Came first in his heat 'for the small house hundreds', but has 'no chance in the final'.

Supposes Georgie will be 'coming home on the Friday'. Asks if they will stay in London from 'the Tuesday to the Thursday'. Will try to keep his place for the last remaining week, but it will 'not count much'. Vanity [A. G. Watson] is going to Greece tomorrow, so Moss and Owen will take Robert's form; Lascelles is taking Watson's house.

Is glad his father is 'so well'. Thinks they will have 'a very happy holidays'. Hallam saw Robert today and said that he should 'go in for the Latin Epigrams [prize]'. Will have to talk to his father about it in the holidays, since it is a 'very important prize' and he should not enter it unless he can 'do a really good epigram'. Will have all holiday to consider it.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle- on-Tyne; 23 West Road, Cambridge from 15 October. - Is very glad about "the Macaulay Classics"; sure nowhere better could be found as a 'permanent home' as 'in a library of the size and peculiarity of Trinity they will be less lost and more known of than in a very large library'. Glad that Bessie is staying on at the Shiffolds for now.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Thanks Bob for the references; has altered the sentence [in his "English Revolution"?]. Sure he will 'run down the A.S. [Algernon Swinburne?] poem'. Glad that C.A [Clifford Allen] hopes to leave [for Switzerland?] on 1 Dec. Thanks Bob for Allen's letter: agrees with it all, but 'alas we are further off than ever from the prospect of a colonial settlement with Germany'.

Letter from Arthur Rinder to R. C. Trevelyan

Farney Close, Peaslake, Guildford. - Thanks Bob for the 'calming poetry' [this year's "From the Shiffolds"?], which is a 'welcome escape from the tormenting questions & difficulties of life today'; expects troubles in 'ancient times' were 'more local', whereas now the 'whole world is perturbed'. Finds the policies of the current government worrying, and fears 'this idea of nationalisation will lead to a state not very different from a dictatorship'; wishes they would 'go more slowly'. Hears reliable reports that the British Zone in Germany is 'very badly administered': this means a 'daily' loss of prestige, and it is very important to 'get Germany on her feet again'; however, the Government largely ignores this and concentrates on nationalisation. 'Poor Pethick-Lawrence is ageing fast under the stress and disappointment'; he 'works far too hard'. He visits them most weekends, and they 'try to divert him' but this is hard. Is glad the "Social History" [George Macaulay Trevelyan's "English Social History"] is 'such a prodigious success', though is 'annoyed... the Government makes quite so much out of the author's brains and hard work'. Sorry that Bob has 'lost E M. Forster' [due to Forster selling his Surrey house], but as they get old 'friends die or circumstances move them away. Only books are left!'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

23 West Road, Cambridge. - Glad to hear about Bessie's 'two companions', both of whom she will need; he can manage to care for Janet with the help of one nurse, as she 'can still read but not walk'. Very glad about the 'Bickbeck RCT library. Nothing could be better'. His book ["A Layman's Love of Letters"] is out next week; will send her a copy. Ralph V[aughan] Williams will be coming to Cambridge frequently in February because of the rehearsals of his "Pilgrim's Progress", which is to be put on at the Guildhall.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland [struck through], Morpeth. - Very sorry for Robert and Elizabeth's 'great sorrow and disappointment' [the death of their new-born daughter Susan], the family's 'first misfortune of that sort' and very sad; realised the threat when Robert told them the doctor was 'very anxious'. Only consolation that it has shown the family 'how much [they] all care for each other, and how closely [they] are bound together'. Thinks George coming to them, and Caroline doing so on Monday, are quite right. Paul is here and 'infinitely sweet, and so well and happy'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Received Bob's postcard 'with great sorrow' that '[Clifford] Allen's most noble life is indeed drawing to a close'; asks Bob to give Allen his 'warmest sentiments of admiration and sympathy'. Knows that Allen's death will mean more to Bob than that of any of his own dearest friends would be to George, since Bob has been 'so closely associated with him in daily life'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

23 West Road, Cambridge. - Sorry to hear that Bessie has been ill again; Janet 'keeps much the same from day to day'. Interested and pleased by the letter Bessie quoted from her German friend; has instructed Longmans to send a copy of his "Autobiography and other essays" to Bessie for her. Glad Humphry and Molly are going to see her.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - This letter may arrive before the one he sent to the Shiffolds yesterday to be forwarded, expressing his 'deep concern' of Bob's report from Rome of [Clifford] Allen's health. Got Bob's postcard from Switzerland today. He and Janet would be happy to put him up in Cambridge near the beginning of March for the Cambridge Greek Play ["Antigone"], though on the 10th he and Janet must be in London in the evening for her Play Centre show; would be best if he could come on Saturday the 11th, the last night, and stay the weekend. Can buy the play tickets.

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