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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Good to hear that Julian is settled in his own nursery again; sure he remembers it 'as he notices so much'. Very glad that nurse [Mrs Catt] is really better, and hopes all will go well now. She and Sir George are settling down at Welcombe; they are alone till George and Janet come on Wednesday. Sir George says Elizabeth 'must not mind about paying'. Sends love to Bob, and says she 'will read the Medici letters [edited by Janet Ross] with much interest'. She and Sir George did not like the Post impressionists [the exhibition organised by Roger Fry at the Grafton Galleries] which 'leave the impression of a bad, & rather nasty dream, though [she] can see how clever some of it is'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hotel des Alpes, Mürren. - Arrived yesterday and plan to stay for more than a week; it is a 'wonderful place' though the air is 'rather fatiguing' at first. She will rest today; Sir George is very well and 'walks a great deal'. The electric railway to Interlaken is pleasant and travels through some fine passes. Very sorry to hear from Elizabeth about the Russells; [their separation] is 'surprising and very sad'; sure Russell is 'difficult, & the family are rather uncompromising' but he is 'a quiet good fellow'; does not know her [Alys] well but thought she seemed 'to belong to another "monde"'. Likes to think of Julian almost walking; asked what is settled about the nurses, and whether Mrs Catt is going to the hospital; it is very sad. People must be very anxious about the weather [for the Coronation]; is glad to be 'out of it all'; Mürrer is completely quiet, with no road for carriages, and Bob would love it. Glad Julian likes his cart. George says [he and Janet] are going on 12 July to the Lakes, and would like to come to Wallington in September; asks if Elizabeth and Robert could be there for some of that time. Is glad the [Trevelyan Man] Hunt was a success once more, it is 'a wonderful institution'. Thinks C[harles] and M[ary] will enjoy themselves at the [Coronation] festivities. Sends love to Robert, and asks if Mr [Roger] Fry is coming.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth is enjoying her time with Madame Grandmont; wonders whether Robert came home last week. They had a beautiful walk on the moors on Saturday. Very glad to get Elizabeth's news of Aunt Margaret [Holland] 'as it is never easy to understand from men about illness'; very sad to think of her condition. Sir George sends his love and thanks for the letter; he has gone to fish this morning. In the afternoon they will attend a meeting of the managers of Cambo school. Elizabeth must tell her what she decides about the violin, and about the house. Is sorry to hear from Mr [Roger] Fry that one of their children [Pamela?] has been ill; supposes they do not see much of the Frys now. Sends regards to Madame Grandmont; wishes they had been in London during her stay. A postscript says that if Elizabeth wants tea in London she is welcome to take it at No. 8 [Grosvenor Crescent]; the housemaid's name is Maria Springett.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear good news of Elizabeth and Robert and especially that there are 'pleasant friends to take walks with'. Would have liked to join them on the trip to Amalfi and have 'seen the lovely pergola again'. Glad the rumour about Mr Fry [that he had died] was not true; wonders how it started. More people drop in for tea than at Wallington, which is good for Sir George in the winter as it stops him getting 'too absorbed in his writing'. Henry James is coming for a few days on Saturday, and Dorothy Ward 'to help amuse him'. Is writing an interesting 'Life of Mazzini' by Bolton King, which is 'very well written'. The local recollection of their parties last summer is 'still vivid'. The weather is fine and mild, though TInson 'remarks that "we shall have a pinch for it, later"'. Wishes she had seen Ravello and Amalfi in the sunshine. Tells Elizabeth to find out about the homeopathic cold medicine; has often heard it to be 'very efficacious'. Asks if Elizabeth would like to join the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club; Caroline must arrange it before 20 February if so. Charles has gone to Paris with introductions to politicians. Sends love to Robert, and is glad his play 'prospers'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Is sorry 'about the wee doggie'; it is very sad but she hopes 'he may recover'. Is sending some game today; the grouse should be eaten first but the pheasants should keep until they return from Stocks [the Wards' country house]. Sir George has recovered, and he and his three friends are 'very happy together'; it is 'too funny sometimes to hear their reminiscences'; Sir George and Lord Belper 'took up an argument just where they left it 41 years ago!'. Mary is here; she and Charles are very happy; she 'certainly improves on acquaintance' and told Caroline that she was 'dreadfully uncomfortable' when staying in August, this is probably what 'made her so abrupt'. Mary is 'enchanted' with the house: they have a 'very tiny one in London' which is not as nice as Cheyne Gardens [George Trevelyan's new house]. Wants to hear what Elizabeth thinks of Cheyne Gardens; they will have fun on Friday and wishes she could be there. Is 'deeply grieved [sic] for Fry's anxiety [about his wife]'. Booa is 'very jealous about the apples & would like to have some'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Would like very much to see the plans [for Elizabeth and Robert's new house, being built at Leith Hill]; hopes they will bring them up to London. It will be a busy time, but they must 'set apart an hour'. Asks whether they will be there on the evening of [Charles and Mary's] wedding, 6 January; Annie [Philips] will be staying with them, and Elizabeth and Robert could come to dine and show the plans then. Elizabeth can have her dress sent to Grosvenor Crescent and change there; they must leave by one o'clock. Believes 'Valescure is still very nice'; seems wise not to make a very long journey in January; expects they will come back earlier than usual to 'look after the house'. George has a cold, and they had a very quiet Christmas day; '[Charles Augustus?] Fitch and a game of whist in the evening being the high water mark of festivity'. Very distressed about [Roger] Fry [over his wife's illness]. Hopes Elizabeth got the pheasants by Christmas day. Very sorry 'the doggie did not recover'. Is reading James's Life of Story ["William Wetmore Story and His Friends"] which is 'in its way quite delightful' and 'makes one long to be in Rome'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will write to Jan Hubrecht at once and invite him; sorry M. [Ambrosius?] and Mad. H[ubrecht] are staying for such a short time. Has had interesting letters from Robert about the Chantrey Com[mission]n, [Roger] Fry and so on; he will be glad when Elizabeth comes. C[harles] and M[ary] hope to get into their new house on 8 August; G[eorge] and J[anet] are going to see Aunt Annie [Philips] tomorrow. If Elizabeth thinks Mary can play well enough to accompany her, they can 'make her practice'; it is very kind of Elizabeth to say she will play at a party. Caroline has to organise the Tenant's party. Asks if Elizabeth's subscription to the G[rosvenor] Cr[escent] Club is due; Caroline will give her the money when they meet; believes the Club has changed management.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad Robert and Elizabeth are going north; there has been a change in the weather today and 'perhaps the great heat is over' though there is no sign of rain yet; yesterday was the hottest day she remembers here, and though they walked before breakfast in the shade of the east wood, the sun was 'too fierce' to go into the garden. Would prefer Robert and Elizabeth's visit not to be earlier than the 29th or 30th July, as originally planned; has arranged some activities for the end of their stay, when Annie [Philips] will also be there, and there would be 'domestic' problems if they came on the 25th. Will write to Mr [Roger] Fry and invite him for the first week in August; would be interested to see the drawings he has made [to illustrate Robert's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"] if he could bring them. Hopes Robert will protect himself against any 'serious loss' in publication of the book. Hopes Elizabeth will not be tired out by London and the journey. The 'new corner seat' is very comfortable but 'needs much "turning down"'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Nice to hear of 'sunshine and flowers' from Elizabeth, as it is still very wintry here. Is glad to spend some time in London, see friends, and feel 'in the centre of things'. Charles, M[ary], G[eorge] and J[anet] often visit, and are all cheerful. George and Janet's wedding is fixed for 19 March; the Wards have taken a house at Oxford for a week for it, it is 'an original business' and she hopes it will satisfy everyone 'except the orthodox!'. Has paid Elizabeth's subscription to the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club, and seen the Secretary, who says its future will be 'settled next month' but she thinks it will carried on. Interested by Elizabeth's account of Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht]'s 'entertainment', and thinks it will be charming as 'the Italians have an artistic strain through all their vulgarity'. Does not think pipes [?] and jam will be useful [for bazaars], but would be glad if Madame Grandmont could send her five pounds worth of Taormina [embroidery and lace] work. Glad to hear the Frys are happier; has been very sorry for Roger Fry. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert will get the question of the road [to the house they are having built at Leith Hill] settled soon; annoying to have lost the winter for building. Wonders what Bob is writing; hopes their translation work is progressing. Politics very interesting, but she thinks the Government will hold on. Has no sympathy for either side in the [Russo-Japanese] War, and wishes 'they could both be beaten'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear they are all well; Caroline sends love; a 'cuckoo for ever calling here' makes him think of 'the dear little boy' [Paul] and of 'Will Shakespeare'. They have just finished Hogg [his life of Shelley], and thinks more of Hogg 'in his queer way' than ever; has been reading a Macmillan edition of Shelley: 'What a poet!'. Has read [Roger] Fry's article in the Burlington Magazine, and paid a second visit to the illuminated manuscripts [exhibition at the Burlington Fine Arts Club] yesterday before leaving London; has also looked through the British Museum facsimiles here and at Grosvenor Crescent. Hopes Fry's wife will 'go on satisfactorily'. The 'Doctorate business' [his forthcoming honorary degree at Cambridge] is 'very plain sailing': Lord Halsbury, Lord Rayleigh, and Sir James Ramsey will also be staying at [Trinity College] Lodge; they lunch at [Gonville &] Caius, whose Master [Ernest Roberts] is Vice Chancellor. Others receiving honorary degrees are: the Duke of Northumberland; Admiral Sir John Fisher; Charles Parsons; Sir James Ramsay; Sir W[illiam] Crookes; Professor Lamb; Professor Marshall; Asquith; Lord Halsbury; Sir Hubert Herkomer; Sir Andrew Noble; Rudyard Kipling; Professor Living; they will 'advance on the Senate House...like the English at Trafalgar'. in two columns. Is looking forward to dinner in the hall at Trinity. Went to Harrow on Tuesday and will tell Robert about it and about the 'Cacciola affair'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Robert's book ["Polyphemus and other poems"] has come; it is 'very pretty and elegant'. Feels that [Roger Fry's] illustrations generally suit 'the spirit of the poetry'. Has begun reading, and was 'much charmed' with the opening of "Polyphemus". He and Caroline are very pleased by the dedication. Sends love to Bessie and asks to be remembered to Professor [Ambrosius] and Mrs Hubrecht, whose address, Janskirkhof Utrecht, is 'delightfully sounding'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Looks forward to discussing his book ["The American Revolution", Volume II] with Robert when it is read. The preliminary reviews are good, and the longer reviews in 'the great provincial papers' are 'most satisfactory'. He and Caroline are very distressed about the [Roger] Frys. They have had a 'famous old Harrovian shooting party': [Lord?] Ridley, [Lord?] Belper, Kenelm Digby, Charles and Sir George; good to increase 'old friendships, which had been loosened by politics for so long a time'. Belper is 'great fun, a humourist of a rough and strong sort' and a 'wonderful man of public business'; he took up an old argument about whether Sir George should have left him a gun-bag in Ireland exactly as it was left 41 years ago. Glad the plans for Robert and Elizabeth's new house are 'in fair train'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Encloses two reviews of his book [the next volume of "The American Revolution"] which Robert may not have seen; asks for them to be returned. Satisfied that he must 'have avoided all contemporary allusions' given that the book was 'inspired throughout by [his] view of the South African [Boer] war'; the "Daily Mail", "St . James's Gazette" and 'any number of Tory papers unreservedly accept the views given in [his] volumes of the American war'. Also, according to a postscript, sending a letter which is 'almost as elegant as a sonnet'; no further details given.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - There is 'fire and spirit' in [William] Everett's poetry, and he is not put off them by the 'lascivior' [lewder] lines; Robert can keep Everett's other letter. A good letter by [Roger] Fry in the November "Burlington"; comments on how well it [the magazine] keeps up. Caroline has given him a detailed account of the Shiffolds; Sir George hopes to see the house in spring or early summer. Glad Elizabeth is interested in his "Interludes [in Verse and Prose]"; it is good to have published his 'old man's book', and to have written it when he was twenty two or twenty three. Hopes his family will stop him writing reminiscences. They are very sad about Herbert Philips [his death]; he was a 'dear good fellow' who had made 'as great a position by mere, unadulterated, goodness' as Sir George ever knew of. Is looking forward to the holiday, as he has been busy for sixteen months; they start on Sunday and go via Paris, Lucerne, and Milan; they have not yet seen inside the Castello [at Milan?]

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - They 'rejoice with' Robert at Roger Fry's success [his appointment as Curator of Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]; glad that Robert will not lose his friend but see so much of him when he comes to England. Thinks Fry's father [Sir Edward] did a 'very fine thing' in returning money [part of his remuneration, to the Metropolitan Water Board] the other day; the 'disinterestedness' it demonstrated has much declined recently. Glad that Campbell-Bannerman's government has taken the step of 'revindicating honesty and public spirit'; was 'disgraceful' of Balfour to reverse the last Liberal government's veto on [ministers] keeping directorships. Agrees with Robert in looking forward to the parliamentary session, especially to the Budget. Sir George and Caroline want to give Robert and Elizabeth a 'minute interest in the Budget' by paying them fifty pounds twice a year instead of making good the income tax on their allowance. Went to the British Museum on Saturday and found a 'Liberal atmosphere' everywhere in London; Welby and Sir Courtenay Ilbert 'seemed to breathe very freely in it'. Has finished Catullus and will read the "[Appendix] Virgiliana" today.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

29 Beaufort Street, Chelsea SW. - Jokes that his treatment of Bob has been 'shameful', especially after the 'splendid sonnet' which he compares to 'a piece of very neat cabinet work, not the highest praise perhaps but just what [he] wanted for an occasional thing like this'. Has been ill since he left Bob at Bristol but is now recovering. Has begun his Brighton lectures [for the Cambridge Extension Movement], with a 'large & enthusiastic audience of elderly ladies who palpitate with emotion'; sometimes stays with his sister [Isabel?] and feels it shows 'great nerve to stay at a girls school [Miss Lawrence's School, later Roedean] & have meals in the common room'. Wishes he were with Bob in the sun though agrees Taormina is not the 'best possible' place in Sicily to stay; warns him not to copy his relative [Florence Trevelyan, who married a Taorminan doctor] and marry the innkeeper's daughter. Remembers coming round a hill onto a terrace by the sea and seeing 'the monster' Etna for the first time. Syracuse is nice but he supposes not convenient to stay at. [Dugald] MacColl has just come for dinner.

Returns to the letter after two days. Went to the Fletchers' last night and heard some good music; [Hercules] Brabazon was there, and 'rather pathetic': has been too much for him to 'become at the age of 70 a great artist & consequently an authority on art has been too much for him'. Some good pictures at the Old Masters [exhibition at the Royal Academy], especially a Tintoretto. Has begun the "Odyssey" with the help of Bob's translation. Has 'some manuscript poems of Gerald Hopkins' [sic: Gerard Manley Hopkins] which would make Bob 'tear his hair'; quotes three lines [the opening of "The Windhover"], but won't disturb Bob's 'Sicilian vespers with the clash of footed metres'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

6 Racknitz Strasse, Dresden. - Bob's letter reached here before he and Helen did, as Berlin kept them much longer than they expected; all the galleries closed at 3 pm so the officials could have their 'mittags essen' [sic]; not dining properly in the evening is the 'only really uncivilized thing they do'. Liked [Georg?] Gronau, whom B.B. [Bernard Berenson] introduced to him, and who took him to see a fine private collection of drawings and sculptures. Dresden is much nicer than Berlin, 'full of fantastic Barocheries and Rocochoneries'; the Gallery is huge but there are 'very few primitives & lots of Rubens & Corregio & 17th century people' whom Fry likes to 'look at lazily'. Helen 'won't come round' to Correggio and doesn't like [Raphael's] "Sistine Madonna"; to Fry's great surprise he finds it 'simply glorious', and 'Raphael painting almost like Titian'; wonders what he would have done had he lived. He and Helen 'never shall agree on Raphael Correggio & Rubens'; is 'almost annoyed' that he always likes the great artists. [Nathaniel] Wedd's "Quarterly" is very interesting; agrees with Bob that it is a shame 'to make it directly polemical', but he does not 'quite know these logrolled Oxford men'; in art he thinks 'most reputations are logrolled so one gets to think it the normal way'. Helen is asleep; they have both been unwell recently due to German food, but are getting well since they 'are in a young ladies Pension & are fed on pap'. Amusing about Miss V. d. H [Elizabeth Van der Hoeven] guessing; thinks she is good at that; is also 'frightened of her a little because she always seems to be observing more than she shows'.

Postcard from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Florence; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Nr. Dorking. - Leaving on Saturday or Sunday for Siena, where they do not expect to spend more than a week, before going on to Pisa and Milan. His book ["Giovanni Bellini"] has been attacked by '[Charles] Loeser & Co who think they will be dealing a blow at B.B. [Bernard Berenson]'; it seems to be 'humorous'; though the point they make is 'ridiculous'. He and Helen went on an expedition with Mrs [Janet] Ross, whom they like very much. Bob must tell them when and where to expect him.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Expects Bob will soon return, but has sent a ring [for his engagement to Elizabeth van der Hoeven] to his hotel; thinks it very beautiful and appropriate. Has not found time to do Bob's house but will go over soon and give instructions for the study and friezes. The 'accursed [Second Boer] war is upsetting everything'; has only forty-two people signed up for his lectures, which start in a week. Helen says he is too pessimistic, but he does not see there is 'much room for people like us in a blatant jingo inflated nation'. Supposes that 'the most incompetent toady' gets to the top of the army just as at the National Gallery and the S[outh] Kensington [Museum]. Discusses Bob's poem, which he likes very much, though is not sure he gets 'this kind of medioeval business as well as [he does] classical'. Has been reading some of the Franciscan poets: Jacopone [da Todi] is 'stunning'; also praises [Saint] Bonaventura's meditations. Has found 'a new and splendid subject' for Bob in the Gospel of Nicodemus, which is 'terrible extravagant & Byzantine'; has told it to [Laurence] Binyon but does not expect he will use it before Bob returns.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Dorking. - Has 'spent all day dancing upon the tight-plank' to stencil a frieze for Bob's hall, since the decorator was a 'confounded duffer' and would have ruined the design; thinks it will be 'rather jolly' but despairs about the sitting room. Asks Bob to thank his mother for letting her ladies' club know [the Grosvenor Crescent Club] about his lectures; has sent some more prospectuses and tickets, but they are now selling well, 'So the war hasn't quite destroyed everything yet'. Will 'jump at the idea' of [illustrating?] Bob's translations, would 'like them to be in a Lorenzo Monaco style'. The ring [for Bob's engagement to Elizabeth van der Hoeven] can certainly be made smaller.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - [Reginald Brimley] Johnson has written, and Fry is going to see him on Tuesday [about Bob's book, "Polyphemus and Other Poems", with illustrations by Fry]. Looking forward to Wallington; wishes Bob could put off his visit to Glasgow [the International Exhibition?] so they could go together, but supposes it is impossible. Has hardly seen B.B. [Bernard Berenson] but has 'heard more than enough of him': will tell Bob about this later. Apologises for 'disconnectedness' as Julian [his son] is 'helping' to write this. has discovered a very interesting picture at the Gibsons' house which they though was worthless but which he has cleaned and found 'a very good Florentine Madonna and child underneath'. Too hot here, but has found a 'new & much finer bathing place'. Thinks from what Johnson says that they will be able to arrange about the books; twelve illustrations would do and should cost about thirty or forty pounds to print.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Saw [Reginald Brimley] Johnson yesterday for a long talk [about Bob's book, "Polyphemus and Other Poems", with illustrations by Fry]; outlines the agreement they have made; suggests the best way to look at it is as a bargain between Bob and Johnson, if Bob can 'see [his] way' to paying Fry another ten pounds. Does not like the 'alteration of having separate pages' for the illustrations, but thinks it can be made to look good. Saw B.B. [Bernard Berenson] yesterday and he agreed the plan was possible. Gives a 'rough sketch of the way [he will] treat the page of design'; hopes Bob will approve.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt. - Has had influenza for a week, and apologises for not writing sooner; [Defoe's] "Moll Flanders", which he and Helen got on Bob's recommendation, has also perhaps had something to do with the delay; praises it highly; says he and Helen feel that Bob is the one person who could have a similar success and wishes he would try. Has been 'preaching before my Lord of Rochester' and other clergy belonging to the Church Crafts' League; does not think the Bishop appreciated his argument that the Church had given Italian artists 'a Polytheism & above all a goddess' which were needed to paint religious pictures; wishes George [Trevelyan?] had been there. Is going on with his altarpieces and wonders when he will have time to paint; has a pile of books to review. The 'assistant Chalism [?] become more & more wonderful an acquaintance', and Bob 'will have to take in him hand' for his knowledge of old books and history; he has read Macaulay four times, and might do better in that line than in painting. He and Helen miss Bob very much; Helen says she will leave Dorking if he does not return to give them 'the talk of the town', which Fry does not have 'the art to pick up'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Bob's idea is 'exhilarating in the extreme'; says he will 'tame a wild rabbit... paint every hair on a stag'. Bob's letter is the best kind of 'patron's letter' as it 'gives the mood of the picture perfectly. It seems already painted'. Helen was as delighted with the letter and the idea as he was. Gives his thoughts on the painting; the figures 'must not be jesuitical' - Bob is right that that is a habit of his, partly as he intends figures 'to be furniture of a landscape and not serious people'. Will come over tomorrow to see [Thomas Sturge?] Moore, or Bob could bring him to the Frys' house, or they could come on Sunday morning. Mrs Crompton will be here tomorrow, and he would like Bob and Moore to see her; invites them to tea.

Postcard from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Les Andelys, Eure [postmark]; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Nr. Dorking. - Thanks Bob for the letter and the cuttings; [Thomas Sturge?] Moore is obviously an 'accomplished journalist' and 'got round to Mackmurdo's corner admirably'; does not enjoy Moore's criticism of his own work, but is 'awfully glad he likes Helen's so much'. They have had one 'divinely beautiful day' and cycled for about thirty miles along the Seine; Helen is already much better for the change. Lists their further travel plans. Thinks 'the Claude ought to have a dark background'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Willow Road, Hampstead. - Glad Bob liked his [painting of] the Beechen Tote [near H]aslemere; thinks it is one of his best and that [John] Masefield is sure to like it. Also thinks that 'the Cowdray oil is the best thing in a way' that he has painted; delighted that [Neville] Lytton agrees, though it will 'almost disappear on the walls of the N.E.A.C.' Hopes to see Lytton this afternoon. The children are with; they are taking Pamela to see Helen this morning. Helen is 'going on well & steadily'; though she tends to be depressed, he thinks this is better than the 'exalted state', and he feels hopeful.

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