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Trevelyan, Paul (1906-1909) son of Elizabeth and Robert Calverley Trevelyan
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Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Has heard from Miss V. W. [Vaughan Williams] about Trevelyan's accident at the Pageant: hopes he has recovered. Asks where Paul's 'playground' was purchased, as he would like to buy one for [Hugh Owen] Meredith's children. Returns two books, and his 'silly Dante paper'. 'Miss Bartlett' ["A Room with a View" has been rejected by the USA. Visits Meredith next week, then Mrs Hope Wedgwood; goes to Abinger next and on the 5th September may join [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson in Italy. Wishes that Trevelyan could come too. Is reading Marco Polo, inspired by Masefield's introduction.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Will send back some of Robert's books: the Chaucer; Conrad's "Lord Jim", which Sir George has read before; and Belloc's book, which Caroline 'can manage better' than Sir George. Arthur Sidgwick, who is 'very well and cheerful', and his wife are here; there has been much toboganning down the hills behind the house by 'all the very large pleasure society of Stratford', though now snow and Stratfordians are gone. Delighted to have news of Elizabeth and the baby [Paul]; Aunt Annie [Philips] is very pleased at the news; she is at Palermo and has been to Segesta, which was a hard journey of eleven hours.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Grateful for the detailed information about Bessy and Paul. Has been reading about 'little Paul in Dombey' [Dickens's "Dombey and Son"]; thinks it the 'best account of a child' in literature which he knows, even better than "David Copperfield"; contrasts it with 'a clever, self-conscious woman or man writing about a child' like George Elliot on the Tullivers [in "Mill on the Floss"]. Thanks God that Paul Trevelyan will have a 'better constitution' than Paul Dombey. Sends an 'amusing letter' from [William?] Everett, which Robert need not return; Everett lacks 'front' and is 'at once the youngest and the oldest of human beings'. Is reading [Plautus's] "Trinummus" slowly, as he is getting tired over the end of his book ["The American Revolution"].

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - The hard weather has 'carried off quite a group of [Sir George's] old London friends', leaving the same sort of gap as was left in his college circle by the deaths of Bowen, [Henry] Sidgwick and Edward Young. Goschen, Davey, Godfrey Lushington, and Allendale ([Wentworth] Beaumont) have all died within about a fortnight. Caroline and Booa [Mary Prestwich] much enjoyed their visit to the Shiffolds and meeting Paul. Was very lucky not to break his hip; is still lame. The Lords have 'a reform bill of their own House'; the "Times" seems not to think this is the business of the Commons, which is 'all very well if the same theory is adopted reciprocally' but they threw out the Plural Voting bill last year.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to have good news of Bessie and Paul; they look forward to seeing them all soon. Caroline has sent for [E. M. Forster's] "The Longest Journey", and Sir George will read it after his current novel. What Robert says about the Apostles inspires him to send some 'scraps... unearthed' when sifting old letters; Cowell was an 'ideal personage... a man who carried camaraderie to the highest point in [their] set and generation'. [Henry] Jackson persuaded Sir George to 'take over my MA' since the University may someday want a Liberal representative. Has nothing to do, and is very tired after sixteen consecutive months of work, including two of illness; the proofs [of the last volume of "The American Revolution"] will be a pleasure. Sends best wishes to Bertie Russell.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - The Leith Hill hotel is a 'very ideal caravansary' and must bring Robert and Elizabeth good company; glad Sidney Colvin admired Paul; is very keen to see him again. Met Jan [Hubrecht] in the street in London and 'mistook him for Hilton Young... no ill compliment'. Jan said it happened to him 'constantly' at Cambridge. Is halfway through his proofs [of the last volume of "The American Revolution"]; glad they will be alone until it is finished. Staying with them have been: Welby; Tom Brassey and his wife; 'the beautiful Lady Carew'; Lady Reay; Bernard and Mrs Mallet; Alfred Lyall. Is halfway through "Dombey" [Charles Dickens's "Dombey and Son"] and is reading other things such as Beugnot's "Memoirs", placed first in interest by Ferdinand de Rothschild 'the great authority on French memoirs'; Beugnot knew '"at home" the Diamond Necklace gang'.

Postcard from Florence Cacciola Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Very glad to hear of the safe arrival of Robert (whmo she calls 'Calverley')'s son Paul - has not been well, or would have written sooner, but is now better. Hopes Elizabeth is 'well and strong again' and that the weather is good so she can get fresh air. Sends love to Mary and Charles and thanks for their letter of 20 December. Has 'never known such an unnatural winter at Taormina': there is 'much sickness - diphtheria, scarlatina, meningitis'. Her husband is well, but worried about her; the servants are 'quiet & satisfactory', the animals are all well. Sends best wishes to Paul for a 'long & happy life, full of health & prosperity'.

Card from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Board of Education embossed card [possibly from Charles Trevelyan, appointed as parliamentary under-secretary]; dated 'Monday. - Molly has been telling them how much better Paul was yesterday; he is very glad to hear it. Read the last half of [Robert's] "Sisyphus" again, aloud to Jan and it read 'capitally'; they both like it all very much. Is giving it to many of his 'literary friends' and hears nothing but praise; he finds some of the metres are too difficult, which is his only complaint.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to have news of Paul; the photograph of him touching Theodore's foot is 'delicious'. The new MP for Hexham, [Richard Durning] Holt and his wife, are staying at Wallington, as are: Aunt Annie [Philips]; Josephine Lawson; the younger Hugh Bell, in whom Sir George has 'discovered a great likeness to [Edward] Bowen' and thinks it 'extends to character'; and Sir Francis Blake. He and Caroline are 'much interested about [Laurence] Binyon'; wonders if [Sidney?] Colvin thinks he is 'breaching on Stephen Phillips's domain'. Glad Robert liked what he saw of [Macaulay's] "Marginal Notes", which Sir George has now typed up; Longmans are going to publish it.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Robert is reading his book [Volume III of "The American Revolution"]; asks him to tell him about mistakes or misprints; the book seems 'well subscribed for'. Sorry to hear about Paul and glad he is better. Sends love to Elizabeth; he and Caroline are interested in the marriage between [Arthur] Richmond and [Theodora] van Riemsdijk. Caroline is in London for a few days; he has his 'very old, and tall, friend Sir Steuart Bailey' to keep him company. Sir Walter and Lady Trevelyan 'turned up on a motor journey yesterday' so he gave them tea; Sir Walter is 'immensely improved in manner and bearing' and she is a 'bright little lady'. Is interested by the 'Wattses [paintings by G. F. Watts?] at Compton'; does not know 'who has Compton [Watts's house there?]'

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Writing to tell her 'what a dear Paul is'; did not see him when he was ill, but he is 'all brightness now'; Paul mistook George for 'his daddy' when he first went in to see him 'and the disappointment caused a scene', but he soon got quite fond of him; the trick is not to touch him too soon. Paul is very like Bob, 'with his curls and all', and they are now great friends. Wishes Bessie 'good luck' [probably as she is due to give birth].

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Thinks this [referring to an enclosure now not present?] is a 'really dear old letter'; he is 'human enough to prefer such 'thinking aloud' to 'propriety' though he would not have written it himself and hopes he will 'be spared a correspondence'. Very pleased that Elizabeth so likes his book ["Garibaldi and the Thousand"]; values her opinion 'highly'. She is 'quite right about the Sicilians'; if it were not for his considerable debt to 'individual Sicilians', he would have been 'more humorous at the expense of their absurd countrymen'. Comments on what a 'jolly time we have on the Fifth of November'. Is lunching with 'the Jans' [Jan Hubrecht and his wife] tomorrow at Cambridge. Notes in a postscript that he knows about Aunt Annie [Philips] and has heard from her.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Agrees that Robert should not be in a hurry to act about Taormina [the legacy in Florence Trevelyan's will]. Would like to hear his ideas about anything in the book [Sir George's third volume of "The American Revolution"]; agrees with him in liking the last two chapters best and is prepared to write another volume 'in that style, and on those topics' if he lives another five years. Sends love to Paul and Bessie; very glad they are well.

Letter from C. P. Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

58 Oakley Street, Chelsea, S.W. - Booksellers are 'disposed to deny all knowledge' of Bob's book ["Sisyphus"] and say it is 'not on Longman's list: Bob should 'stir up' his publishers. Has managed to get hold of it and thinks it 'much the best thing' Bob has done, though the 'queer metres & methods of scansion', which he supposes are influenced by [Robert] Bridges, are sometimes puzzling. Doubts however whether 'bigamy had been made a felony in the time of Sisyphus'. Hopes that Bessie and Paul are well.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Grand Hôtel Continental, Siena. - Rather 'arctic' in Siena; Hilda Trevelyan has been staying here a while and will come to tea tonight; she is leaving tomorrow. He and Caroline enjoyed Florence very much; all the new building is in the suburbs so the 'essential part of the city' is not at all spoiled. They had a good visit to the Berensons, whose house must be good to stay in. Supposes Robert is at Cambridge today. Sends love to Elizabeth, with assurances of their interest in Paul and his 'troubles'; made friends with a 'lovely little Italian baby' in a street near the Duomo yesterday. Has read about the Sicilian property [left to Robert by Florence Trevelyan, but only after her husband's death]; does not feel great confidence and dislikes the way the will was arranged in Sicily rather than by the Trustees' lawyer, which benefits Dr Cacciola; however, Robert 'is in good hands,' and his financial prospects mean he need not 'undertake certain worry for an uncertain prospective gain'. Is very interested in the third volume of [Guglielmo] Ferrero's ["The Greatness and Decline of Rome": "The Fall of An Aristocracy"] and has Cicero's "Philippics" with him. Currently reading the "Heauton Timorumenos" [Terence's "The Self-Tormentor"], which is a 'rattling comedy'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Palace Hotel, Rome. - Sorry to hear about the fall of the cedar and the little dog's death; Elizabeth must be sad. Glad about Paul; had never noticed how much 'gymnastics' a year old child does pulling itself onto its feet until Geordie was around them this autumn. They have been out to the Appian Way to lunch, and spent a morning going over the grounds of the Villa Mills on the Palatine which is to be pulled down for excavations. Always thinks of Robert at the Farnese casino on the Clivus Victoriae, where he had the 'altercation with the friend of the custode'. Has read [Cicero's] Philippics, inspired by Ferrero, and has 'rarely enjoyed a book more'; also delighting in reading Terence. Glad to hear what [James Stoddart?] Bain told Robert; there are beginning to be signs that the book [Volume III of "The American Revolution"] is a success and is doing well in America, though it came out in the midst of an unprecedented 'financial tornado'. Their hotel is quite full of 'very quiet, respectable Americans', most of whom are ladies.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Her baby [Humphry] has been much better yesterday and today, though he is not quite well yet. Did know about the Walker-Gordon milk, and will order it when Humphry returns to cows' milk; at the moment he is 'only having white-of-egg and water in his one bottle'. He is obviously 'very sensitive to the slightest impurity in milk' and they will have to be careful, but has stayed 'most cheerful' throughout. Thinks of Bessie and Bob 'so often & so sadly'; is sure [the death of their son Paul' 'must get worse & worse' for them. Tells her to come and see her again soon. Notes in a postscript that her other two are 'quite flourishing again'; Theo 'has been turned into a real boy, with knickers and short hair!'

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Is watching the developments [surrounding Florence Trevelyan's legacy to Robert] 'with a friendly, but not a critical eye'. He and Caroline have also had 'vile weather' but have suffered no physical harm; glad the same is true of Elizabeth and Paul. Agrees with [Benjamin] Rogers about [Racine's] "Plaideurs"; thought it 'very poor stuff' when he read it as a boy 'to illustrate [Aristophanes's] the "Wasps"'. They have just finished the Queen's letters ["The Letters of Queen Victoria", edited by A C Benson]; there is much that is interesting 'embedded in a vast mass of twaddle': too much is included by 'so many royalties... not above the average of their class', and though the Queen's letters are often 'very human and spicy' the book should have been half the length. Agrees with Robert that the Mid-Devon [Ashburton] election should shake the [Liberal] party up. Hilda and Audrey Trevelyan have been staying.

Letter from Donald Tovey to R. C. Trevelyan

S.Y. Zingara, 'floating in the neighbourhood of Skye, where it rains angoras and terriers'. - Hopes that Trevelyan and 'Mrs. Poet' are well, and that [their son] Paul is recovering. Has almost finished a 'declamatory sketch' of the first act [of "The Bride of Dionysus"]. Sets out the plan describing musical themes in some detail. Mentions some alterations he would like made at various points throughout the opera. Thinks the length is 'practical but formidable' but that it would be a 'great mistake' to cut it.

His theories about 'the possibilities of musical form in modern opera are vastly enlarged and changed': believes that much 'Wagnerism', such as 'the abnormal exaggeration of every pause in Wagner's sentences' will one day seem archaic. Wagner's 'business-technique' no longer impresses Tovey and he now feels, 'candidly' that he can do 'far better himself', in part because he has much better material. However, Tovey is 'driven to despair' by much of Wagner's music - he lists numerous examples - which can make him feel that the only point for him to write music is to amuse himself. Yet he thinks 'the musical patchiness of Wagner is an archaism' and 'the [Richard] Straussian development of the unmusical side of Wagner's technique is... the vilest humbug ever foisted on ignorant journalists by a cad'. Refuses to have anything more to do with 'modern tendencies' in musical drama; ready to learn many things from Debussy about timbre but cares nothing for the 'new doctrines & practices' from any other point of view.

Is visiting the Speyers around the 6 September and asks if they could meet there, or whether he could visit the Shiffolds after that or they could meet at the Dakyns' house over the Haslemere concert. Wants to run through what he's done on the piano, and would be very glad if Elizabeth Trevelyan could hear it.

Card from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Donald [Tovey] hopes to come to the Trevelyans tomorrow afternoon from London; he is 'enviable' as he gets into all sorts of confusion, is 'handsomely penitent, and immediately forgiven', and will see Paul [Trevelyan] and his parents. Donald has been trying to see [Arthur] Nikisch, who asked him to play his Concerto to him with a view to performing it. After his stay with the Trevelyans, he goes on to the Gerald Balfours then to Brighton to play a Beethoven concerto: asks when she will have him at Northlands. A postscript notes that Donald is going to Broadwood's tomorrow.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear they are all well; Caroline sends love; a 'cuckoo for ever calling here' makes him think of 'the dear little boy' [Paul] and of 'Will Shakespeare'. They have just finished Hogg [his life of Shelley], and thinks more of Hogg 'in his queer way' than ever; has been reading a Macmillan edition of Shelley: 'What a poet!'. Has read [Roger] Fry's article in the Burlington Magazine, and paid a second visit to the illuminated manuscripts [exhibition at the Burlington Fine Arts Club] yesterday before leaving London; has also looked through the British Museum facsimiles here and at Grosvenor Crescent. Hopes Fry's wife will 'go on satisfactorily'. The 'Doctorate business' [his forthcoming honorary degree at Cambridge] is 'very plain sailing': Lord Halsbury, Lord Rayleigh, and Sir James Ramsey will also be staying at [Trinity College] Lodge; they lunch at [Gonville &] Caius, whose Master [Ernest Roberts] is Vice Chancellor. Others receiving honorary degrees are: the Duke of Northumberland; Admiral Sir John Fisher; Charles Parsons; Sir James Ramsay; Sir W[illiam] Crookes; Professor Lamb; Professor Marshall; Asquith; Lord Halsbury; Sir Hubert Herkomer; Sir Andrew Noble; Rudyard Kipling; Professor Living; they will 'advance on the Senate House...like the English at Trafalgar'. in two columns. Is looking forward to dinner in the hall at Trinity. Went to Harrow on Tuesday and will tell Robert about it and about the 'Cacciola affair'.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Hollycroft, Cavendish Avenue, Cambridge. - Is glad that Trevelyan's wife is as well as can be expected [after the death of their son Paul]; asks if they are in Holland. Has been staying with [Hugh Owen] Meredith in his new house; goes tomorrow with Mrs Barger to join a party in Wales. Is reading "L'Iles des Pengouins" [sic: "L'Île des Pingouins", Anatole France] but is rather disappointed.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Sends best wishes for the new year, in which she hopes 'Paul will become an elderly and extraordinary robust person', Bessie will remain just the same, and 'the Poet' [Robert] will 'put forth a great work'. Donald [Tovey] caught a chill on his visits to East Lothian which makes her worry about his concert tour to Manchester and Bolton. He has to be at Englefield Green on Tuesday night, as he needs to find some music for Lady Hallé, and feels he needs to go to Worplesdon [to see his parents] for lunch on Tuesday; asks if Robert Trevelyan could spend Tuesday night at Englefield Green. Is in very low spirites; thinks she will have to go to Valescure in April after all.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Robert's account of the [recently discovered passages from?] Menander is very interesting; would like to see the book and will return it to the [London?] Library; this is an exception to his usual preference for not reading the classics when he is working. Paul 'winds himself round one's heart'; can see 'steady progress' and hopes this will be a turning point. Very glad Bessy has had her cousin with her. Sends a 'really amusing letter' from Everett. Asks the meanings of the titles of Menander's plays. Caroline will not write today.

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