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Patterson, Charlotte Frances (b 1872) daughter of Arthur John Patterson
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Relates that after leaving Patterson in Budapest he 'went for much briefer visits to Vienna, Munich, Strassburg [sic], Nancy, and Paris'. Claims that the week he spent in Budapest was the part of his tour 'on which the light of memory shines by far the most brightly'..Supposes that the university people 'will by this time have all reassembled', and asks Patterson to send his greetings to Beóthy [?], Lanczy, Medveczky, Pulszky and Vambery and others. Asks him to send him the address of Professor [József?] Szabo, to whom he had promised to send his photograph. Asks Patterson to ask Mr Pickler if Sidgwick had promised to send him something, and what it was. Asks him to thank Sir A. Nickelson if he meets him for his kindness to him, and to tell him that the [conversation] of Mr Szillerzy [Dezső Szilágyi?] has often recurred to his mind. Declares that if he had the time he would like to write an article on Hungarian politics, but that preparations for the International Congress of Experimental Psychology will absorb his spare time for the following three months. Expresses regret that they did not have more private and personal talk. Sends his greetings to Patterson's wife and daughters.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Refers to Patterson's letter, which he has considered and talked over with Bryce. Believes that he should try 'to enter into regular relations with one or more newspapers'. Asserts that 'this does not seem...incompatible with the writing of more occasional letters to refute misrepresentations in other papers.' Discusses suggestions made by Bryce in the course of their conversation. The latter would be willing to act as an intermediary between Patterson and the person who generally supervises the foreign correspondence of the Times. Bryce also has influence in the case of the Speaker - 'weekly Gladstonian organ' - and the Manchester Guardian. Sidgwick believes that of those three, the Times is the best. Suggests to Patterson that it would be better not to mention to any English journal that he was paid by the Hungarian government, but that he should hint that he had access to the best information. Reports that Mrs Sidgwick has had an accident; 'fall causing slight concussion of brain'. Hopes that Patterson's wife and children are all well.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Acknowledges receipt of his paper on '"Home Rule" etc.', and notes that there is no covering letter. Asks Patterson whether he has any choice as to the magazine in which it is to appear. Suggests the Fortnightly or Macmillan. Asks if he minds Sidgwick altering a word or two, 'and occasionally adding a sentence or two'. Sends greetings to Mrs Patterson and their daughters 'and all Hungarian friends.' Refers to his own change of address; states that he is living there 'as an appendage to [his] wife who is principal of this institution [Newnham College]'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Refers to Patterson's last letter, which reached Cambridge a day or two before Sidgwick contracted influenza. Explains that he is in Seaford, Sussex, for convalescence. With reference to Patterson's article on 'Home Rule in Austria-Hungary', suggests that unless he is strongly moved to alter it, he should not do anything with it. Reports that the editor [of the National Review, see 98/48: Leopold Maxse] has accepted it but does not want to publish it, because he mistakenly thinks it is about Irish Home Rule. Thinks that if the reference to Home Rule were to be eliminated 'its interest for English readers generally would be impaired', but that the editor would probably find some other excuse not to publish it.. Declares that he will try to see the editor in London about the matter. Reports that Bryce is very busy now; he is chairman of a Royal Commission as well as President of the Board of Trade. Sends greetings to Patterson's wife and daughters. Reports that Mrs Sidgwick is 'temporarily absent, attending her Royal Commission'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Reports that he got Patterson's article typewritten and sent it off to the editor of the Academy, but has as yet not had any reply. Explains that the interest in England in Hungarian and Roumanian [sic] matters is very limited. Suggests that the article 'would have been better if it had had more the air of giving a summary of the controversy, and less the appearance of being two reviews rolled into one.' Reports that they [in England] are taking more interest than usual in Austrian affairs, 'owing to the general upsetting of arrangements that seems to be going on', and that their interest is being stimulated by the 'object-lessons' that they think they are receiving in the working of Federalism. Declares that 'the political barometer is pointing to Federalism as the next form in which the Irish question is likely to come before [them].' Observes that at the present the Liberals and the Home-Rulers seem to be losing ground. Hopes Patterson is better than when he wrote, and sends greetings to his wife and daughters. With envelope.

Letter from Margaret Patterson to Nora Sidgwick

Announces that they are sending the letters [from Henry Sidgwick to her father, A.J. Patterson] to Nora that day, and apologises for the delay. States that there are not as many of them as they had previously thought there were. Asks Noa to acknowledge receipt of them.

Patterson, Margaret Esther (b 1883) daughter of Arthur John Patterson