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Lánczy, Gyula (1850–1911) historian and politician
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Sympathises with Patterson with regard to his 'misfortunes'. Asks him to tell G[yula?] Lanczy that, on consultation with Seeley, the Regius Professor of History, they are in agreement that Smyth's Lectures on the French Revolution 'is now a quite antiquated book', and not worth buying for the Kolosvár [now Cluj-Napoca] Library. Reports that Seeley had never hear of Professor Miller's History Philosophically illustrated, and that he [Sidgwick] thinks that it too 'was rather passé.' Reports that he cannot find the essay of Patterson's friend and colleague [Frigyes?] Medveczky; asks him to tell him the title, and he will try to read it in some library. Undertakes to try 'to secure the favourable notice of "Mind" for Dr Pickler's [Gyula Pickler?] essay', and asks Patterson to forward the translation to him. Reports that they are 'on tenterhooks, expecting some continental explosion and a conflagration of [ ] extent'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Advises Patterson that if he should arrive early and find Sidgwick out, the porters will direct them to the two sets of rooms; those of G.W. Balfour and those of Sir W. Harcourt. Invites Patterson and [Gyula?] Lanczy to breakfast in Newnham.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Relates that after leaving Patterson in Budapest he 'went for much briefer visits to Vienna, Munich, Strassburg [sic], Nancy, and Paris'. Claims that the week he spent in Budapest was the part of his tour 'on which the light of memory shines by far the most brightly'..Supposes that the university people 'will by this time have all reassembled', and asks Patterson to send his greetings to Beóthy [?], Lanczy, Medveczky, Pulszky and Vambery and others. Asks him to send him the address of Professor [József?] Szabo, to whom he had promised to send his photograph. Asks Patterson to ask Mr Pickler if Sidgwick had promised to send him something, and what it was. Asks him to thank Sir A. Nickelson if he meets him for his kindness to him, and to tell him that the [conversation] of Mr Szillerzy [Dezső Szilágyi?] has often recurred to his mind. Declares that if he had the time he would like to write an article on Hungarian politics, but that preparations for the International Congress of Experimental Psychology will absorb his spare time for the following three months. Expresses regret that they did not have more private and personal talk. Sends his greetings to Patterson's wife and daughters.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Regrets that his influence with London editors is limited to Macmillan, but asks Patterson to send him A Martyr. Is certain that Frederic Macmillan will give him advice as to what to do with it. Undertakes to ask Kegan Paul, in default of Macmillan's advice. States that the only book [by a friend of his] he had published by Kegan Paul had little commercial success. Suggests that a publisher might think it more advisable to publish the two tales, A Martyr and Noble Rest together. Recalls his 'very pleasant week in Buda-Pest', and sends greetings to Beothy, Lanczy, Medveczky, Pulszky, W. Bal[ ] and others.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to A.J. Patterson

Refers to the invitation to accept an honorary doctor's degree' made by Patterson to him in his letter of 24 April, which would like to accept if possible. Regrets that he is not able to come to Budapest to receive it in person on 13 May. Explains that he must attend an important meeting of the Council of the University of Cambridge on 11 May, and the journey that he would have to undertake to reach Budapest in order to attend the ceremony would have a detrimental effect on his health. Asks Patterson to express his grateful appreciation to Professor [Béla?] Földes of the honour, and his regret at not being able to accept his invitation. Expresses sympathy with Patterson about the bad state of his health. Asks him where he expects to be in August. Explains that he must go to a Congress at Munich early in that month, 'and afterwards proposed to go to some Bavarian or Austrian mountains', and suggests that they might meet. Asks him to send him a postcard when his plans are fixed. Sends greetings to his family and to Professors B[eothy], Medveczky and Lánczy.