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Tawney, Constance Catherine (1841-1920) wife of C. H. Tawney
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Letter from Charles H. Tawney to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for her letter of 12 September. Regrets to say that he has been in the habit of destroying letters; however, he has usually kept one from each friend, and adds that he has one written by J.J. Cowell. Sends one to Nora [not included]. Undertakes to send more if and when he comes across them, but explains that in cleaning out his rooms in Calcutta he used to destroy letters. States that he walked about too much in the hot weather in the Isle of Wight, and has not fully recovered. Regrets that he did not pay a third visit 'to that place near the Langham. States that he may be able to recall facts about Henry's early life, and adds that [C.E.?] Bernard was also with him at Bishop's College. Claims that then Henry was 'as good in mathematics as in classics.' His wife sends her love, and hopes that some day Nora will be able to go and see them. Declares that Annie Latham has often talked to him of Fontainebleau. Adds that he still possesses the Hippolytus [by Euripides] that Henry and he read together 'at that house in Redland', and recalls that they 'all used to play in a sort of alley with trees behind it, Bernard, Lawrence, W. Sidgwick and Arthur S.'

Tawney, Charles Henry (1837-1922) Sanskrit scholar

Letter from Charles H. Tawney to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks Nora for sending him a copy of Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir, which he is reading diligently. Was glad to know that Henry was in favour of giving votes to women. Relates that C.J. M[ ] convinced him [Tawney] 'that they ought to have votes', and claims to have made 'two little speeches in favour of this' in his Society. Does not believe, however, that there is any hope of success. One of his daughters [Mary] is a nurse and another is in Miss F[ ]'s Chelsea Furnishing Company in Sloane Square; he believes that working women 'will never get justice until they get votes.' Declares that he is astonished to find that 'such an enormous amount of work could be crowded into a life time.' Recalls Sidgwick having studied Arabic and Hebrew, but states that he [Tawney] then left for India. Claims that there is much for him to learn in the book. Adds that his wife joins him in sending regards and thanks.

Tawney, Charles Henry (1837-1922) Sanskrit scholar

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Declares that he was very glad to get news of Mary [Minnie], as the latter does not write to him. States that he has not heard from William either. Claims to be very busy with correspondence. Refers to developments at Rugby, and remarks that 'things keep dragging on'. Reports that he has asked about the governess, but without success. Asks his mother if she has applied to Mrs [Frances?] Kitchener, who has 'a sort of calendar of the women who pass and take honours in the July examination: in case they want any post of an educational kind. Reports that his old friend Tawney is in England, but that he has not seen him yet because of his [Tawney's] wife's illness. The latter 'was a Miss Fox daughter of the Dr. at Clifton'. Refers to the 'matter of young Meyer', which he declares to be 'a horrible puzzle'. Presumes that his mother hears enough from Rugby to know that 'the crisis seems to have come.' Speculates on the likely outcome.

States that he has read very little in the recent past, 'except Plato and Greek History', and reports that he has been writing 'an erudite paper on the Sophists for [their] Philological Journal.' Reports that he has 'only managed to read Macmillan and Miss Thackeray's story in Cornhill and Middlemarch: and O. W. Holmes's new book [Poet at the Breakfast Table]' which he thinks is 'a falling off but still enjoyable'. Has heard that the new Darwin [Expression of the Emotions] 'is very entertaining'. Sends his love to all, and adds that '[Strange] Adventures of a Phaeton in Macmillan [by William Black] seems to [him] excellent'.

Letter from Charles H. Tawney to Nora Sidgwick

Writes to express his sympathy with Nora, and his sorrow on the death of his friend Henry. Regrets that he did not go 'a third time to that house in London', and explains that, as he had not received a postcard, he believed that the Sidgwicks had gone away. Adds that he was 'on the point of writing two or three days [previously] about some matter connected with the hibernation of a Hindu ascetic', and claims that he was not aware that Henry was so ill. Informs her that he and Henry were at dayschool together in Clifton before they went to Rugby, where, he says, they were always friends. Recalls Henry's kindness and encouragement when he was unhappy about the Exhibition Examination at Rugby, and how Henry made it possible for him to join the Apostles at Cambridge. Admits that there was 'a little intermission of intercourse broken by occasional letters' when Tawney went to India, but remembers how kind Henry was in inviting him 'to that house near Hobson's Conduit, and his meeting Tawney at the station. Adds that his wife had hoped that both Nora and Henry might come to visit the Tawneys before Cambridge opened. States that he admired Henry a great deal, and that he was 'such a cordial and sincere friend'.

Tawney, Charles Henry (1837-1922) Sanskrit scholar