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Keynes, Florence Ada (1861–1958) social and political activist
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Letter from J.N. Keynes to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks Nora on behalf of himself and his wife for the copy of Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir, and declares how much he is looking forward to reading it and to learning more 'of one whom he admired and revered more than any other person [he has] ever known.' Is pleased to hear that [The Principles of] Political Economy is 'selling steadily'; suggests that an index would be useful. Offers to supervise its creation, and states that it would be well for him to see '[W.E.?] Johnson at an early stage in order to ascertain the lines on which he is proceeding.' Thanks her for sending him the cheque, and declares that he does not believe that he has any claim to it, and would rather should consist in feeling that he had carried out a wish expressed by one to whom he owed so much. Asks her not to think ill of him for returning it, and suggests that part of it might be used 'as the remuneration of Johnson for making the index.'

Letter from J. N. Keynes to Nora Sidgwick

Sends Nora what he has written for the Economic Journal [not included]; it is very kind of her to agree to read it before it is published, and he will be grateful for any suggestions. Refers to the alterations he has made in the light of the notes she sent him.

Explains that the course of lectures referred to by Professor Mandello [see 104/74] is a course on philosophy and sociology, delivered by Henry Sidgwick in the Easter term of 1896. When Mandello was in Cambridge he dined with them and afterwards called on them; does not know or remember enough about him 'to have any reliable view as to the value of his opinion.' Also does not know anything about the Institut de sociologie of which Mandello speaks; undertakes to find out more if he can. Does not know who is the best person to consult about the desirability of publishing Henry's course of lectures on sociology. Returns Mandello's letter.

Keynes, John Neville (1852–1949) logician, economist, and university administrator

Letter from J. N. Keynes to Nora Sidgwick

Writes on the death of Henry Sidgwick, which has come as a great shock, despite his being in some measure prepared. Besides the personal loss he feels, he grieves 'that so much work that can ill be spared has been left unfinished'. Refers to the debt he owes Henry, and to his gratefulness for his kindness, his wise guidance, intellectual stimulus, and his ideal of duty. Says he had no other friend in Cambridge who has done for him as much as Henry has done. Trusts that in returning to her work in Cambridge Nora will find occupation for her thoughts that will prevent her from dwelling too much on her loss, but fears that even in her work that loss will ever be forcing itself on her attention. Adds that his wife joins him in sending sympathy to Nora.

Keynes, John Neville (1852–1949) logician, economist, and university administrator