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Swanwick, Helena Maria Lucy (1864-1939), feminist and pacifist
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Letter from Robert Oswald Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Has read "Sisyphus" with 'much amusement'; thinks that 'apart from the ingenuity of the plot' Trevelyan has kept it 'all so thoroughly Pagan', though comments on his own 'cheek' for saying so when he knows no Greek and little Latin. Supposes it would 'go very well with a good deal of music', but wonders whether it might be 'rather long' if totally set to music. Asks whether Trevelyan has seen Walter's article in the "Fortnightly [Review]" on the Whistler [biography by Elizabeth and Joseph Pennell]. Sorry that the Women's Liberal [Federation] 'did not employ women stewards at the Albert Hall [for the meeting on 5 December] as there would not have been as much violence; his sister was there for the "Manchester Guardian", and 'very indignant at the violence', but Sickert thinks 'the audience were most to blame in taking things into their own hands'. Asks whether 'the Jingoes' will come into power, since 'as soon as one tries Home Reforms one has the Upper House against everything'.

Letter from Marie Busch to R. C. Trevelyan

147 Willifield Way, Golders Green, N.W.11. - [Irene] Cooper Willis has not sent the notice [of the death of Helena 'Nellie' Swanwick] but Trevelyan must not worry; of course the Manchester Guardian was the most likely paper to have it, but wonders if any of the other papers mentioned her death. Knows that he was fond of and admired Nellie; she recently came across an appreciative reference to him in a letter to old Henry [Swadling]; when she next goes to visit Henry in hospital she will ask to see the letter again. Thanks Trevelyan for planning to send some of his books: she has some, mainly later ones and of course "The Bride [of Dionysus]" which she still thinks one of his best; she never grew tired of either the poem nor [Donald] Tovey's music when she was occupied with it [preparing a German translation]. She will also miss Ursula Hoff, though she has seen less of her for the last couple of years; hopes she will be happy in Melbourne 'and develop new sides of her nature which is so gifted in many ways'; afraid she will be having a bad voyage, with 'God & Hitler giving ships an angry time'. Bessie must also have found the gales 'fast and furious' at Brighton, hope she has still benefited from the change.

Letter from Marie Busch to R. C. Trevelyan

147 Willifield Way, Golders Green, N.W.11. - [Irene] Cooper Willis has sent her the cuttings [about the death of Helena 'Nellie' Swanwick]; she has read them to their 'old friend' Henry Swadling [former manservant to the Sickert family] and now returns them. He could not find the last letter which Nellie [Swanwick] wrote to him, but will send it to her when he does. Has read [Robert Bridges'] "Testament of Beauty", which she only partly understands but likes what she can grasp of it; for the first time in her life she is 'getting closer to Shakespeare', and she is re-reading ["The Tale of"] Genji with pleasure.

Letter from Marie Busch to R. C. Trevelyan

147 Willifield Way, Golders Green, N.W.11. - Thanks Trevelyan very much for the 'noble edition' [his "Collected Works"?] which is like 'drinking very fragrant tea out of Sèvres cups, a pleasure in itself'. Sends Nellie Swanwick's letter to Henry Swadling; no doubt Nellie also 'experienced the faithfulness & practical help of [Trevelyan's] friendship' and Marie is glad he can feel her appreciation after her death. Says Nellie 'always had a greater opinion of virtue in women than in men - excepting her own (good but dull) Fred'. Since it was Nellie's last letter to him, Henry would like to have it back; he is in Hammersmith Hospital. Wishes Trevelyan 'as cheerful a Xmas as one can hope for at present'.

'Extract from last letter of Mrs Swanwick to Swadling', in R. C. Trevelyan's hand. No date. Helena Swanwick has heard nothing from Walter since his wife [Thérèse Lessore] wrote to say they were settled in Bath: Walter never writes. Leonard does nothing, as usual, and 'isn't fit to do anything'. Bessie [Sickert]'s orchestra has dissolved, and is working without salary in a government office; thinks she will stay if her health stands it; she still lives in her flat in Gower Street. Robert Trevelyan's 'dearest friend', Lord Allen of Hurtwood, died in the summer and he is looking after the widow and daughter. He is 'very heartbroken... one of the few men really capable of devoted affection'. Agnes is well. She herself can 'hardly walk at all' but the gardening is finished.

Letter from Robert Oswald Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Asks for the address of the "New Quarterly". Does not know whether the editor [Desmond MacCarthy] takes fiction, but would like to try him with a translation of a short story by [Eduard] von Keyserling. They hear from Oswald [his brother] 'at longish intervals': he finds New York 'cosy and provincial', so he is breaking away from Henry James there, and by now is on his way to Sydney. Asks if Trevelyan has been 'perpetrating any Pageants'; he himself is 'too stingy', though the Chelsea one seems attractive; they 'ought to put in the immortal "Jimmie"'. Supposes Trevelyan is still occupied with his opera [the "Bride of Dionysus"]. Their sister [Helena Swanwick] has been 'most earnest and active in her Suffragist cause', but Londoners are generally 'frivolous and indifferent about it'. Asks to be remembered to Mrs Trevelyan, and how Trevelyan's son [Paul] does.

Letters from H. M. Swanwick to A. F. Scholfield

Concerning the donation of a book in her possession created by Augustus De Morgan, recording the quarrel between Richard Sheepshanks, Sir James South and Charles Babbage, now on the shelves of Trinity College Library, shelfmark Adv.c.16.32.