Showing 3 results

Archival description
Coppard, Alfred Edgar (1878-1957) poet and author
Print preview View:

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

21, Theatre Road, Calcutta. - Is very grateful for the trouble Trevelyan has taken with his MS; agrees that it is unfair that no publishers will take his poems even when costs will be covered. The publication of his book would also have helped his chances of getting the University Professorship of English which will soon fall vacant; prefers this position to his own due to the lack of 'concrete material of the Asiatic arts' which necessitates indulgence in 'fantastic theories'. Cannot afford to have it printed himself, and will not hear of Trevelyan spending more money on him. Used to know a man called Coppard at Oxford, a 'towering intellectual from the working classes', whom he heard has had success as a novelist; he used to like Suhrawardy's verses, especially the ones printed in the 1916 "Oxford Anthology" (Amelie Brázdová must have mistaken this for the "Oxford Book of Verse"; would like to know in English what she has written about him; she makes mistakes as she is not familiar with England and Suhrawardy is 'horrified' that his friends might think he has given her false information). Coppard suggested getting the poems privately printed at the Golden Cockerel Press, with which he had some connection. If Trevelyan could lend him the expenses for a year, he would like to have the poems published there or with the Chelsea Press. Is sorry John Lane have rejected his book; used to know [Ronald?] Boswell, in the management there, at Oxford, and once met him at Trevelyan's friends the Archibalds' [Dorothy and George]. Tells Trevelyan to do what he thinks best, but only if he really thinks it worthwhile to get the work published: he himself is out of touch and cannot judge the merits of his verses properly.

Very glad Trevelyan saw [Marie] Germanova in Paris; they write in detail about each of his visits. Sends love to Bessie. Hopes Julian and Ursula are happy. Strange times in India: he had 'great sympathy with the Congress' and stood as a candidate for the Upper House in Bengal by 'indirect selection'. Due to 'indiscipline and bungling' he lost, for which he is now very glad as the path the Congress is following is 'sterile'. Does not understand the 'Congress formula', nor its tactical value. Calls Gandhi 'the divine bungler'. No chance of escaping the heat and coming to Europe in the summer; hopes he can persuade his father to consult his doctor this autumn, in which case he will come then. If not, he hopes to come next year, for longer. Is taking up the study of Chinese: when getting on in years 'one must have a quest that is endless', and Chinese will last him 'several reincarnations'.

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

21, Theatre Road, Calcutta. - Has received the air-mail post card. dated 19 July, which Trevelyan sent to an old address. Had thought that his poems should be printed one per page as it is a small collection, but since Trevelyan writes that continuous printing would save four or five pounds, will leave it up to his judgment and S. M. [Sturge Moore]'s advice. The job he was hoping to get [see 6/121] is to be given to an Englishman; a 'quite uneducated' Durham man, with Methodist training, the special education minister here, has been sent to England to find a candidate. If Trevelyan is surprised that after popular government the English are being employed in greater numbers, it is because each minister wants his regime to be a success and 'in spite of nationalist avowals feels in his heart of hearts that no Indian is really efficient'. Wonders if those who proposed the Act had this 'Machiavellian purpose in view'; it will come as a surprise to those like [Clifford] Allen who really want gradual transfer of administration to Indian hands. So Trevelyan need not hurry with the publishing of the book: any time in autumn will do. Suggests a revision to the first poem in the China Sea series, in case this can be made without expense and inconvenience. Was touched by [A.E.] Coppard's remembering lines he had written twenty-two years ago: he quotes from a poem printed in the "Oxford Anthology 1915" and another, which Suhrawardy had totally forgotten, in the "Palatine Review"; this was an 'ephemeral venture', edited by Aldous Huxley, intended for the poetry group of his time at Oxford. Has found a 'faded copy' and is sending Trevelyan the poem for inclusion if he sees fit. Is not in good health; after four years he has not managed to 'identify [himself] with the country' and remains an 'alien'. His chances of coming to Europe in autumn are remote, as his father does not like leaving 'his house, his servants, his masseurs'.

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

21, Theatre Road, Calcutta (on University of Calcutta printed notepaper). - If Trevelyan thinks the "Acacia Tree" is below standard, he should not print it: Suhrawardy has sent it because of [A.E.] Coppard's letter and because Aldous Huxley had liked it and included it in his 'first literary venture' [the "Palatine Review", see 6/124]. Was worried in case the book would seem 'amateurishly slight'. Is upset because he has had a letter today from [Marie] Germanova saying they [she and her husband Kalitinsky] are going to move to a small three-roomed flat and let 14 Nungesser et Coli, saving less than fifteen pounds a year; he wants them to live as comfortably as they can since they are 'all three' [including the dog, Rex] old. For their last days there, they will have Bev and [their son] Andrée there, as well as his own nephew who has finished his school at Hastings and Germanova's nephew from Russia. Is so glad Julian and Ursula went to see them. Asks if there is still time to get three hundred copies of the poems instead of two hundred: it may be possible to sell some; only wants two hundred to be bound. Calcutta 'humming with political excitement' about the Andaman convicts on hunger strike; students are out in the streets protesting against the government, in which his brother (whom Trevelyan once met) is the Labour Minister. Asks how Bessie's eyes are, and whether Trevelyan had heard of Ross Masood's sudden death; he was [E.M.] Forster's friend.