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Hubrecht, Hermina Paulina (1843-1883) mother of Elizabeth Trevelyan
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Draft of speech given by Ambrosius Hubrecht at the wedding of Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven and Robert Trevelyan

His father [Paul François Hubrecht] has asked him to act as master of ceremonies. Remembers the 'veneration' he felt as a boy for his father's young unmarried sister [Hermina], 'not so very [underlined] many years' older than he was himself; he happened to be present on her first meeting with his mother's cousin [Jan des Amorie van der Hoeven], and the marriage followed soon afterwards. Spent 'many pleasant hours' when a student in Utrecht of 'that uncle and aunt whom we cherished so dearly', and 'what fun' they often had, which [Mien] Röntgen and Elizabeth Trevelyan missed as they were then 'babies in cradles or babies in arms'. When these babies, as young girls, had 'the great misfortune' to lose both parents, it was 'the most natural thing in the world' that they should be looked after by his own family, and soon were considered by his two sisters and himself 'an absolutely integral part of our parental home'.

Did not then know that their home would be 'subjected to predatory raids made upon it by the most diverse foreign nations'. His dear brother [in-law] Alphonse [Grandmont], a 'staunch Belgian', has taken his elder sister [Bramine] 'not only across the border, but as far as the extreme south of Italy'; they are said to have a 'charming villa' there, which he is sorry he has never seen 'in the groves of which many nationalities meet and do not always seem to regret it' [a reference to the bride and groom's first meeting]. Mien was 'abducted not so very long ago by a fair haired Saxon' [Julius Röntgen] whose name 'already celebrated by his own achievements, has travelled all over the world on the all-penetrating rays of his cousin' [Wilhelm Röntgen, discoverer of X- or Röntgen rays]. Fortunately, he did not take her to Leipzig and they remain in Amsterdam. Now their 'youngest little sister' Bessie has also decided to 'throw in her lot' with a foreigner. Sure however that her husband will soon become one of them, as the other two have. Robert and Elizabeth already know, and Ambrosius hopes his parents and brothers 'whose presence on this occasion is such an inestimable pleasure' will also have realised in the last few days, that their sadness at Bessie leaving is 'far outweighed by the joy' that her husband 'has become so very dear' to them 'on his own account', especially to Ambrosius's mother; he jokes that he even feels a 'little jealous'. Therefore it is a 'case of international brotherhood' dictating his toast to the health of the bride and groom: 'may their union... coincide with a period of peace and good will among nations'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia. - They have heard from Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] that she had caught a bad cold, could not work, and decided to go now to Taormina as Bramine [Hubrecht] had proposed she should come and spend a month with them; thinks this is a good thing since she thinks it was parting from Maud [Howard] which upset Tuttie more than the cold; it 'really is a most morbid friendship'; discusses Tuttie's character, and the tension when she and her sister Mien came to live with their uncle and aunt after their mother's death and Tuttie had much of the responsibility of looking after them since 'she was far too young and domineering'. Reflections on the time that children grow up and do not take their relatives for granted, along with the varied nature of her own experience so far. Has to go and prepare as she is going with her uncle and aunt to a dinner party with the vice president of the State Council, a friend of her uncle's. Dreamt last night that she and her sister arranged to share husbands, though she herself was rather reluctant; later she had a still worse dream in which there was no Bob and a man 'like a young Dane I met last summer, a cousin of the Hartmann's' was kissing her 'and I even enjoyed it!!'.

Writes next day that she has received Bob's letter, and the enclosure from his friend [Thomas Tettrell?] Phelps which is charming; remembers what he said about Phelps' 'prophetic jokes' and hopes the one about the Hollanders does not come true; promises she will not get fat as she is 'too bony' and anyway has no figure to lose. Describes the dinner party last night: one of her neighbours at table was from Zeeland and told her stories about the customs of the peasantry there; the host was also from Zeeland and they usually have a very strong feeling for their province. There was some talk of Bob; a 'fat gentleman, the secretary of the Council' seemed to have read nearly all of the Trevelyan family's literature and asked many questions; their host proposed a tost to their engagement. Looks forward to reading 'the Paolo and Francesca play which is so much the rage' [by Ste[hen Phillips]; wonders if she will feel as critical about it as Bob does; will also read "The Merchant of Venice" and re-read "Romeo and Juliet", though she has a lot to read and the Hague is not as quiet as Ravello. Laetita Ede has sent her "The Golden Age" by Kenneth Grahame; asks if Bob knows it. Is glad the weather is better and he has got some work done; the Germans call a bad poet a 'Wasserpoet' or waterpoet; she could call him a 'weather-poet' as he 'can only do good work W[eather] P[ermitting'; apologises for teasing him. Asks what play he is working on; knows it is not the one he showed her a scene of. Now Bob has read Ambro [Hubrecht's] article he is 'clever & scientific again' and can let her go to lectures in peace. Gives a satirical sketch of his character, then says she is cross today, firstly for spilling tea down her new dress and secondly as she had bad dreams again last night.

Continues the letter on Sunday afternoon. Ambro and his wife are coming tonight or tomorrow to spend the week, with their children who are 'sure to make things very lively'; unfortunately the thaw has set in so they will not get much skating, which they love. Has read of the destruction of the Capuccini hotel at Amalfi by a landslip; asks if this is true and whether there has been anything felt at Ravello. Her uncle has written to Lord Reay to ask about necessary formalities for the marriage and has had a reply giving some but not all the answers he requires; Lord Reay has made inquiries about Mr [William Edward Hartpole] Lecky's marriage, as his wife is a Dutchwoman [Elisabeth van Deden] also with some landed property; they held the civil marriage in the Hague in the Town House and at the English Embassy. Hopes this will be enough for them; an 'English church marriage' would be 'very unpleasant in this case'; hopes he feels the same; would like to leave out as much 'conventionality for the world's sake' as possible. If they want the Grandmonts to be there, it will have to be after May, while it will need to be before August for the Röntgens to be present. Her uncle will write to Bob's father as soon as he knows exactly how things stand. Asks how [Pasquale] Palumbo is doing, and whether Bob had a good Christmas.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Her uncle received Bob's letter with 'all the legal papers, settlement etc.' last night. Asks if Bob read through the settlement; she tried to last night but did not understand everything, nor did her uncle, so he has sent it to his lawyer to have it explained and they will return it as soon as possible. Her uncle was surprised not to find the marriage contract enclosed; thinks he expects Bob to write saying he approves and sending the contract back. Does not now feel 'bitter' about the earlier tensions as she loves and understands her uncle too much. [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife called yesterday and left cards, so the 'bridge' is formed. Is busy with packing and clearing; tonight she will look through an interesting old collection of papers relating to her mother's life and marriage with her uncle; she will certainly want to keep her mother's own letters. Tomorrow she is lunching with her 'only Dutch co-senior of St. Andrews, a girl from Rotterdam whose mother was an old friend of Bramine [Hubrecht]'s. Likes the clavichord present all the more as she thinks of it; thinks it very nice of Bob's friends; asks if Mrs [Helen] Fry [who decorated it] is pleased, and what 'poor Dolmetsch' will do without it. Teases Bob for having 'wedding presents from nice young lady friends [Lily Hodgkin] sent over from Dresden' and keeping it secret from her; she found out from Alice Jones. Tells him not to forget the parcel Booa will give him, nor the gold spectacles; he should also bring his play and any other poems he likes.