Showing 1 results

Archival description
Wedgwood, Arthur Felix (1877-1917) author, mountaineer and soldier
Print preview View:

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Union Society, Cambridge. - Hopes Bob will be visiting soon. Is 'very busy' getting to know people, 'finding plenty of friends of a younger generation' so he will 'not feel shelved next year'. This is important as 'both [Ralph] Wedgwood and [G.E.] Moore are particularly lazy' about doing so: Moore is 'much more wrapped up in his metaphysics' and this 'seems to make him quite unconscious of the outside world'; he 'never says a word at Hall' or makes any effort to get to know anyone; it is 'really rather sad', for himself, and because he 'might be so very valuable' if he tried 'to influence people or educate them'; he is 'a king of debate' and they have 'grand meetings [of the Apostles' Society] largely owing to him. Hopes that their relation [Walter] Greg, 'a man of very great ability', will be chosen for the Society this year. Young [Felix] Wedgwood is 'very [emphasised] young, but very clever and original... If his brother is the Puritan he is the cavalier'. Was at '[Godfrey] Locker-Lampson's place' recently seeing their library; was most interested in the original Blake editions; the "Songs of Innocence" are 'most wonderful"; describes the "Tiger" in detail. Bob should try and see Blake's books at the B[ritish] M[useum], as they give a different idea of Blake than the '"Book of Job", where there is more thought and possibly [emphasised] less genius', though George himself likes that best. Would like to tell Bob about an interpretation he has of the "Book of Thel".