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Marchand, Jean Hippolyte (1883-1940) painter, printmaker and illustrator
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Draft letter from R. C. Trevelyan to [Jean Marchand]

On headed notepaper of the National Liberal Club, Victoria Street, S.W.1. - On returning to London, he talked to Ruth Fry, Roger's sister, who is the president of the 'Mission des Amis' [Friends War Victims Relief Committee]. She said that communication with Russia was very difficult at the moment, but that if Marchand wants to arrange to get his niece [actually Olga Lewitska, daughter of Sonia Lewitska -see 22/56] out of Ukraine, it would be best to write to [Maxim] Litvinoff at the Hotel Cosmopolite, Copenhagen, asking for his help and advice as the one responsible for admitting foreigners to Russia and getting them out. Ruth Fry doubted that Litvinoff would consent to helping with such a case, but it might perhaps still be worth trying, and strongly suspected that it would not be possible to get the girl out. Might be possible to send letters to Kiev through Litvinoff.

Trevelyan will write to [Francis] Birrell to go and see Marchand as soon as he arrives in Paris; Roger Fry will also give his advice when he arrives. If it is better to send a letter as soon as possible, advises him to write to Litvinoff and send that letter to Trevelyan, who will ask Ruth Fry to send it as she is in communication with Litvinoff; this may make him pay more attention to the matter. Necessary to decide before writing whether they want to try and get Marchand's niece out of the Ukraine, or simply to send letters. Wishes he could give more definitive advice, but will do his best to help if he sends a letter. Marchand knows how much Trevelyan is sorry for the pain Madame Marchand [Sonia Lewitska] is experiencing at the moment, and how much he would like to help if he could.

Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence, addressed to Julian at 12 rue de la Grande Chaumière, Paris VIᵉ, Francia. - Bessie says this is Julian's address at the moment; hopes he has found somewhere which suits him. Came here from Cortona with [Umberto] Morra two days ago. Expects he will come to Paris around 16 Feb, when Bessie and perhaps the C.A.s [Clifford and Joan Allen] will come for a few days. [Maria] Germanova hoped Julian would come to see them. [Gordon] Luce is still at the [Hotel] Londres; expects he will stay there to. Asks Julian to say what he should pay [Frederick] Porter; would rather pay too much than too little, and would prefer not to wait as Porter may need the money. Morra says he will write to Julian soon. Asks to be remembered to [Jean] Marchand and [Hasan Shahid] Suhrawardy. Sends love to [?] Franz if he is with Julian.

Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence; addressed to Julian at 7 Villa Brune, Paris XIVme, forwarded to the Shiffolds . - Asks Julian to remind him of[Maria] Germanova's address, as he wants to send a 'book of Jean [Marchand?]'s to Andryusha [Kalitinski]', also asks whether he should address it to 'Andrey' or 'André'. May spend a few days in Paris around 24 or 25 February, or go straight home. Everyone at I Tatti sends love. Bessie hopes Julian will be able to come before the Busch [Quartet?] concerts.

Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Addressed to Julian at 7 Villa Brune, Paris XIVme, France. - Expects he will come to Paris on Wednesday 3 January, but perhaps not until the next day; had better stay at the [Hotel de] Londres. Will leave on the evening of Saturday 6 January. Hopes to see the Kalitinskys [Aleksandr, his son Andryusha, and wife Maria Germanova] and [Jean] Marchand 'if he is visible'. Betty Muntz comes to Paris early on Saturday morning. He and Bessie are having 'a very pleasant Christmas with the Archibalds [Dorothy and George]; all send love.

Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Villino; addressed to Julian at Hotel de Londres, 3 rue Bonaparte, Paris, France. - [Hasan Shahid] Suhraw[ardy] sent a telegram this morning, which Bob has just sent to the Hotel de l'Est; has also forwarded a letter from Bessie to Julian at the [Hotel de] Londres. Tells Julian to remember the Gallerie Marseilles on the rue de Seine, who are sure to have some [Jean] March[and]. Marchand's old address was 7 rue Caulancourt in the 18th arrondissement, but Bob expects he will have moved; you can get to Montmartre by metro. Julian should ask Marseilles and his son, at the shop [how to contact Marchand]. Asks Julian to send his love to Suhrawardy and tell him to write.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Thanks Julian for his letter and picture; likes the colour and contrast in the picture, though he and Elizabeth differ over whether part of it is a tree root or a rabbit hole. Will be interested to hear the new poems; missed Julian's recital of poems from last term, but expects he has forgotten those by now. Is dining in London tonight with Monsieur [Jean] Marchand, the painter; he may come to visit before his return to France. Still problems with the water supply at the Shiffolds, so they are having to miss out on baths and fetch water from Tanhurst. Mr and Mrs [Gordon and Emily] Bottomley were here all last week, and Mr [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson is visiting now; can hear his typewriter in the drawing room, and a chaffinch outside.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The Shiffolds, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking. - Thanks his mother for her 'kind letter' and the rucksack, which he will 'find very useful indeed'. He 'suppose[s] one is well past the "mezzo del cammin di nostra vita" [quoting from the first line of the Divina Commedia at fifty', but he does not feel as if he were 'getting old yet'. Saw Charles last week in London, who 'seemed cheerful'. Bessie will see him next week. Is going to London tonight for a dinner 'in honour of [Jean] Marchand, the French painter', who is a friend and will come to the Shiffolds for a visit later 'if he can find the time'. On Saturday Robert and Bessie 'go to Garsington near Oxford, where Philip Morrell and Lady Ottoline live. It is about the only country-house visit we have paid in years. [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson is staying with them for a while.

Is getting on better with his work than he has 'for some time past'. They have had 'some rain, but not enough yet'. Their water has failed, 'not through drought, but because the pipes have got furred up. They are being opened now to see where the stoppage is'. They 'can't have baths, but get along somehow by bringing water from Tanhurst and washing in rainwater'.

Asks if his mother has read 'Sophie Kovalesky's [Sofya Kovalevskaya] memoirs, in French': expects she would like them if not, and he might send them to her when he has finished reading them

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Il Villino, Corbignano, Settignano, Firenze. - Aubrey [Waterfield]'s letter to Siena has not produced any results; hopes nothing very important to Julian has been lost. A wire arrived from [Hasan] Suhrawardy the morning after Julian left saying his house was full so he could not put him up; hopes Julian has now made contact with him. Has sent some letters, including one from Bessie, on to the Hotel Londres. Hopes Julian had a successful visit to Paris. Is quite comfortable here, and gets on very well with [Roger] Sessions. Asks Julian to let him know how he found Suhrawardy, and [Jean] Marchand if he saw him.

Letter from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

2 Rue St Martin, Neauphle-leChateau, (S[eine] et O[ise]) [from envelope). - Apologises for not replying sooner to Trevelyan's letter: being in the country he has been working very hard, although has not therefore done anything which has satisfied him. Did not see [Francis] Birrell at all: he cannot come to Marchand's house without Marchand knowing. Marchand left at the end of May and came to a 'little place' in the Isle de France, Neauphle-le-Château. Sonia [Lewitska] is already doing better than she was in Paris but she still has a lot to do to recover completely. He 'regenerates himself as well as he can, without having found the ardour of the past': believes the last five years will 'weigh heavily' on their 'much-maltreated generation'. Vignier [?] is 'always equal to himself', and claims in fact to surpass himself as he is working hard to progress without a pause.

Saw Miss Deacon twice during her stay at Paris, but in a very unexpected way. Regrets that he has not received Roger Fry's article, and so has not thanked him, but hopes to send soon to send Fry an almanac he has illustrated in collaboration with several artists. Hopes to come to London some time around November; will be very pleased to meet Trevelyan's wife and 'young amateur of landscapes' [Julian], who seems typically English to him as he has often noticed that the English have a 'predilection' for this genre of painting. Sonia has finished her woodcuts for the Joinville [Jean de Joinville, "Le Livre des Saintes Paroles et des bons faits de Notre Saint Roi Louis"], and they both send best wishes to both Trevelyans. Adds a postscript that he does not have many details about his exhibition [at the Carfax Gallery?]: asks whether it was not 'too disparate' despite the range of periods it covered.

Letter from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

Is 'very culpable and negligent' towards Trevelyan, but he is 'always so indulgent' that Marchand hopes he will be pardoned again; he is obviously an 'almost disgustingly lazy being'. Begins by thanking Trevelyan as well as 'the young artist' [Julian]: asks if Julian still likes Corot, and if so to continue his appreciation of that artist, whom Marchand himself loves more and more. As Trevelyan thought, they are at Vence; he had a hard job 'detaching Sonia [Lewitska] from the hill' where she 'incrusts herself every winter like a crab on a rock'. Hasn't seen Trevelyan for a long time; has a fond memory of the first time he met Madame Trevelyan, for whom he feels much affinity; his regret for not visiting her at 'Gluffolds' [an error for Shiffolds?] is greater, and he regrets that he no longer knows when he will be in London again, since the exchange rate is 'ruinous' and the future 'quite sombre'. Wonders what has become of everyone who was gathered then: has not seen [Francis] Birrell or [Arthur?] Waley since then, though he thinks often of them. Waley sent him a book which he read slowly and has re-read continuously about the works of Lao-tse and other Chinese writers, translated by Vignier: it is both full of old experience and new goodness, and some phrases apply perfectly to the current situation. Is only returning to Paris in the last week of April; Trevelyan will give him great pleasure if they can meet then. Adds a postscript as Sonia sends best regards to both Trevelyans. Marchand asks if Trevelyan is still working on his translation of Aeschylus and Sophocles. Has seen that in the last election 'notre ami' Winston Churchill was beaten again: he can then leave it all for his 'mad passion - that of painting'. Asks Trevelyan to send him Waley's address if he has a chance.

Letter from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

Learned that Trevelyan [?] came once to the Restaurant du 3 Ponts [?] while Marchand was on leave, and must therefore have returned from his voyage; asks whether he will soon have the pleasure of meeting him. Asks him to tell him his news, and whether he started the new year well; asks what has become of M. [Francis] Birrell. Postscript saying he is still at the same address: if Trevelyan comes to find him there they can go for lunch together.

Letter from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

Service photographique et cinématique de guerre. - Asks 'what has become' of Trevelyan; wants to know some information. Hopes now to be demobilised at the beginning of March and to take up his paint brushes seriously again; also his life before the war, though he asks whether they will find again that 'lost paradise'. Would love to see Trevelyan again before his departure for the south; asks him to come and find him one day and they can lunch together; would be very happy if M. [Francis] Birrell were in Paris and could accompany them.

Letter from Sonia Lewitska to R. C. Trevelyan, with postscript from Jean Marchand

Thanks Trevelyan for his letter and what he has done to help her: it is a 'great moral path' for her, and she hopes that with the help of a heart 'as great and generous' as Trevelyan's, she will be able to 'remedy this misfortune'. She encloses her letter to [Maxim] Litwinof and also that to her little one [her daughter Olga]. Adds in a postscript that she is also enclosing her letter to 'the sister of Monsieur Fray' [Roger Fry's sister Ruth, general secretary of the Friends War Victims Relief Committee]: asks him to read it, and if he does not think it too foolish to give it to her; also to let her know the response as soon as possible. If there is no hope of sending a Quaker to search for her daughter, she will go herself immediately to Warsaw (she is applying for her passport) and perhaps there will be a way of getting to Kiev from there. Marchand despairs and does not want her to leave because she is so weak; she is made worse due to her 'torment' [of worry for her daughter]. She went to the Ukraninian mission [embassy?] again yesterday, and spoke there to a colonel who came from Kiev a month ago, who says that Kiev has become a 'totally dead city', and that everyone who can has left; the peasants no longer bring their produce as when they do the Bolsheviks requisition it and take it to Moscow; they take everything from 'unfortunate Ukraine', which is becoming increasingly poor. There are no trams or streetlights working; worse, there is no piped water, and those like her family who live a distance from the river are suffering terribly. People cannot get new clothes, or shoes; they go bare-footed with boards tied to their feet; lack of water means that there is much dirt and fever. The colonel said the 'atmosphere is so sad and overwhelming', and that he himself was maddened almost to suicide, but preferred to 'do even the lowest work here and eat only dry bread than to return there'. He travelled for a week in goods wagons, standing all the way, 'packed in like cattle' with ill, dirty, drunk and coarse people. She does not know if she can live knowing that her daughter is so much suffering there.

Marchand writes to Trevelyan on the back of Sonia Lewitska's letter: thanks him for everything he has done for Sonia: is very saddened by all that [Sonia has learned] . Had news this January from Mademoiselle [Angela] Lavelli. Asks how Trevelyan's family is. Has not seen [Francis] Birrell again.

Postcard from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

Postmarked Azay-le-Rideau; addressed to Trevelyan at Mission Anglo-Americaine de la societé des Amis, 53 Rue de Rivoli, Paris. - Apologises for not coming to see Trevelyan before leaving due to pressure of business. Hopes his card will find Trevelyan in Paris; tells him to write to him with his news and that of his friend [Francis] Birrell. Gives his address as archivist to the SPCA at the Château d'Azay-le-Rideau.

Postcard from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

Feels guilty towards Trevelyan: every day means to write to him and then puts it off. Is at Vence with Roger Fry at the moment: they often work together, and often talk of Trevelyan. Asks how [Francis] Birrell is. The weather is quite good; many flowers are growing and the croaking of the frogs in the evening is 'alarming'. Thinks he will definitely be in Paris when Trevelyan comes back from Italy and passes through, to have the pleasure of seeing him. Is not going to London this year. Sends regards to Mrs Trevelyan.

Postcard from Jean Marchand to R. C. Trevelyan

Was very sorry not to see Trevelyan during his visit. Met Roger Fry again here; they have talked about Trevelyan, and Fry has translated an article about him from an English newspaper; it was very complimentary and Fry says justly so. Translating the article, and commenting on it, almost made Fry miss his train. Hopes to see Trevelyan in England in May.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Hotel de Londres, Paris. - Has been in Paris with the Allens for three days, and is going on with them to Bolzano; will be at the Berenson house around 15 July for about a fortnight; may then go to see [Umberto] Morra at Cortona, or to Aulla [to see the Waterfields]. Saw [Jean] Marchand yesterday, who was glad to have seen Julian, and that he is coming to Marchand's academy in the winter; liked some of Marchand's latest work. If Julian returns to Cambridge he could still spend some time with Marchand this winter; would of course be very pleased if he chose to return, but he must use his own judgement. Has seen a lot of [Hasan] Suhrawardy and [Maria] Germanova, who were sorry to have missed Julian; Suhrawardy may be away on Julian's return, but Germanova should be in Paris. Allen is 'fairly well, but easily tired'. Saw Terence Gray briefly in the street, who looked well, and was 'very friendly and cheerful, and almost without his stammer'. Suhrawardy sends love; the Allens are upstairs packing and resting.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Friends War Victims Relief Committee, A.P.O., S.5., B.E.F., France. - Glad to hear from Julian's letter that he is getting on 'quite well' [at school'; he must have enjoyed his visit from his mother; wishes he could have come too. Sorry he cannot be home for Christmas, but will have to stay until March. Glad Julian has heard from Tom Ugle, whom he hopes is better; supposes he will have to 'find a new engine' unless he is going to give up engine-driving. Went on a long train journey last week to Sermaize [les-Bains] to see the relief workers and ask what books he should get for them. All the houses there were burnt in a great battle four years ago [the Battle of the Marne], and the people have to live in wooden huts which are being made for them until proper ones can be built again. Everyone in France is glad the war is over; he hopes there will be no more wars in his own or Julian's lifetime. Is going to lunch with 'Monsieur Coquetot' [Jean Cocteau?], who is 'very clever and writes plays and also draws very well', and is 'very pleasant company' but talks so fast Robert cannot always understand him. Has made friends with 'a very good French painter called [Jean?] Marchand, who talks more slowly' so he understands him better; Marchand paints 'chiefly landscapes, but sometimes portraits or still-life'. Is going for lunch by underground railway: the 'Tubes in Paris are not so deep down'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Thanks Julian for his letter; asks him to let them know next time whether [Maria] Germanova, [Aleksandr] K[alitinski] and Rex [their dog] are living in [Hasan] Suhrawardy's rooms or elsewhere, whether they are very uncomfortable, and whether they have heard when Suhrawardy is returning, as he was 'very vague' in his last letter, though he seemed to like Bob's "Epistle" to him. Terence [Gray] and [Frank] Birch seem to want to produce his translation of Euripides' "Medea" at the end of May; thinks this means Birch rather than Terence, and perhaps he will like his production more than he usually does Terence's. Does not know whom they have chosen to play Medea, and fears it will be 'no one adequate'; Germanova is 'out of the question... after the fiasco of Terence trying to get her for nothing last year'; in addition she would need weeks of study and coaching to do it in English, even if she could leave Kalitinski, which she clearly cannot; asks Julian to say how Kalitinski is now. Bessie is distributing the notices for [George] Reavey's book ["Faust’s Metamorphoses: Poems"]; Bob thinks it would be better if they had a sample of the poetry as well as the drawings. Sends his love to [Jean] Marchand, if Julian sees him again. Will not go to Paris at Easter, nor to Wallington for Kitty's wedding, but stay at the Shiffolds. C.A. [Clifford Allen] is 'fairly well', but has 'ups and downs'; Bob is going with the Allens to see René Clair's ["À nous la] Liberté" on Thursday, but otherwise he 'plug[s] away at [his translation of] Lucretius"; will soon have to get in touch with [Hugh] Sykes Davies again. Julian's Mount Athos picture 'looks very well on the floor still'; must put it up over the fireplace. Quotes a poem by Po Chu-I [Bai Juyi] about his study. Things are going more smoothly at Edinburgh now; thinks [his and Tovey's opera "The Bride of Dionysus"] will be better sung and produced than last time.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

I Tatti, Ponte a Mensola (sotto Settignagno). - Has just arrived from Paris. Mary [Berenson] is still 'very much an invalid', but B.B. and Nicky [Mariano] seem all right. Saw [Maria] Germanova in Paris, who hopes to see Julian if he comes over; [her son] Andryusha is arriving today he would see him. Also saw Betty Chetwynd, who still seems 'rather an invalid', and has to take things very easily; she is going to her mother at Nice for three weeks on Sunday and says if Julian and Ursula would like to use her flat when in Paris they need only go and tell the concierge; they need not write to her beforehand. Discovered that the friend of [Jean] Marchand who is so ill lives in the same house, so went to see them and Marchand afterwards.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Empire Nursing Home, Vincent Square, London, S.W.1. - Is getting on very well now [after his operation] with little discomfort. Bessie reads Trollope to him most afternoons, and he usually has visitors each day: T[homas] S[turge] Moore is coming to tea today. Hopes Bessie will go to Paris next week, then on to Holland: no reason for her not to now Bob is 'so well' and go to the C.A.s [Clifford Allens] for the first couple of weeks after he leaves the nursing home. He works through chess games in the papers, and has just been looking at the tournament between Cambridge and Oxford, in which the marks were equal; Bronowski, whom he supposes is Julian's friend [Jacob] 'lost his game rather disastrously'. Terence Gray wants to do Bob's [translation of Euripides'] "Medea"in May, which he has agreed to but now regrets; Gray is trying to get [Maria] Germanova for Medea, but 'wants her to do it for nothing'; Bob has telegraphed to her saying she should 'on no account... accept the engagement. It is too monstrous'; Gray probably wants him to step in and pay Germanova himself, which he will not, as he will not be able to get to rehearsals and go through the part with her; Gray is also intending to put Medea in a mask, which is 'the height of folly' regarding Germanova. Unlikely Germanova would have been able to take the part with her husband [Aleksandr Kalitinsky] so ill. Wonders if [Hasan Shahid] Suhrawardy has gone to India yet and whether he has finished his book. Hopes Julian is getting on well with his work; frescos must be 'fun to try', though expects Julian is 'likely to make rather a mess at first'. [Étienne Adolphe?] Piot was 'technically quite competent' but artistically bad. Asks to be remembered to [George] Reavey, and to [Jean] Marchand if Julian sees him. Hopes Bessie will come to Paris next week, and see the Luce family. He and Bessie had hoped to see the Sykes family this month, but had to put it off; supposes [Hugh]'s exams are coming up anyway.