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Benn, Edith Maude (1859-1947) wife of Alfred William Benn
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Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Alfred Benn

Pensione Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italy. - Thanks Benn for the letter about his book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems]: 'such appreciation and criticism' are the only real rewards for the 'pains of literature'; particularly pleased that Benn has singled out for praise lines which he himself likes best. Also encouraged by Benn's approval of his 'blending more modern ideas with classical fable', for which he has sometimes been censured. Must read the passage from Plutarch mentioned by Benn, which will serve as an 'answer to such objections'. Discusses the use of Roman and Greek names for the gods in poetry. Is afraid his 'ideas on the natural history of Satyrs, Pans, fauns etc, are somewhat confused', but then so were ancient ideas; will pay more attention to the question soon. Once read a story that Sulla was brought 'a wild goat-footed man' in Greece, whom he attempted to interrogate but without success; thinks the author described him as a 'satyr' but has not been able to find the passage, which should be in Plutarch, again. Hopes Benn will 'meet such a one' near his new home [at Florence] this summer; hopes it will not be too far from I Tatti. He and his wife have heard nothing from [Bernard] Berenson since they left, though he had discussed coming south; they hope his health is better. They send regards to Benn and his wife.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Alfred Benn

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Sends an advertisement for the "Independent Review"; Benn will see that Robert's brother George and [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson are on the committee; they are in fact 'the most active members'. There may be varying opinions on the journal's independence, as it is 'certainly of pronounced radical tendencies'; but there is reason to hope it will 'keep a high standard'. He and Bessie send regards to Benn and his wife, and hope to see them again this winter.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Alfred Benn

The Shiffolds, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking. - Sends back the two books by [John] Davidson which Benn lent him; it is 'queer stuff, but some of it is quite fine' and he finds the fable of the beasts in "[The Testament of an] Empire Builder' amusing. Davidson can be 'remarkably eloquent', but Robert does not think that, as poetry, it is ever first rate, while he dislikes and sometimes 'detest[s]' the thought, whenever he can make it out. He is still grateful to Benn for making him read the books, and has even bought copies for himself. Bertie Russell, who is staying with the Trevelyans, asks to be remembered to Benn; he is 'very full of the election', and intends to do 'a good deal of speaking'. The psychology book which [George] Moore though so good was "Empfindung und Denken" by August Messer. Is going to hear Moore give a paper in London tomorrow on the 'Subject Matter of Psychology' to the Aristotelian Society. Bessie is well, and asks to be remembered to Benn and his wife.