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Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge Ward, James (1843-1925) philosopher and psychologist
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Letter from Nora Sidgwick to James Ward

Claims to have meant to send 'these [articles]' sooner, but has been puzzling over the lectures on sociology, which she had mentioned, intending to send them also. Feels that she had better get 'a clearer picture of them and of their relation to published papers' before sending them.

With regards 'the Classical Review article' returns Dr Jackson's letter to Ward [not included], and sends one from J. B. Mayor to Henry Sidgwick . Asks him to return the latter at his leisure. Thinks that it would be a mistake to print the article in a collection of Henry's papers, as 'his part is so very short'. Adds, however, that Miss Sharpley, to whom she showed it 'is much charmed with it as an imitation of Plato'. States that Henry's part 'only brings out one point and [one has] no means of knowing whether he admitted Grote's answer to it to be sufficient - whether the G[ ] of the latter part of the whole paper can be considered as representing Henry's view or not.' Speculates as to the circumstances under which the discussion took place, and suggests it took place at Trumpington. Thinks that the article should be referred to in any bibliography and that a bibliography 'ought to be given either in the volume of fragments or in the biography....'

Also sends him the 1871 number of the Contemporary Review, 'containing the article on Verification of Beliefs...and one in the Nineteenth Century for 1880 on Historical Psychology'. Remarks that Henry was rather dissatisfied with the second one when it appeared. In relation to 'Miss Jones', states that she believes that Henry 'intended her to judge about publication [or] republication of Ethical matter in the same way that he asked [Ward] to do about philosophical work.' Thinks that she is 'a little too much inclined to publish' and considers trying to argue with her about any particular paper before a final decision is come to.' States that 'of course the question of republishing all the papers in Mind or all the notices of books is not purely a question of Ethics. Adds that 'in deciding about Ethical or Philosophical papers or anything else [they] must have regard to the whole amount to be published and the arrangement of volumes and must therefore talk it over all together to some extent.'

Announces that she envisages the publication of two volumes; one of 'philosophical and ethical etc fragments and essays for students' and one of 'more literary essays suited to the general public, and no more', and that the second would probably be entirely reprints. Lists the works possibly to be included in the first volume, including Kant lectures, Green lectures, Ethical papers, lectures on Sociology, articles on the Sophists in the Journal of Philology, the 'Dialogue in Mind on Time and Common sense', 'the articles in the Contemporary and XIXth Century sent with the letter [not included], Ethical articles in Mind, and 'some lectures on Kant's Ethics'.

States that the 'popular volume edited by A[rthur] S[idgwick] would probably be small', and would probably contain a review of Clough in the Westminster Review of 1869, an article on Bentham in the Fortnightly of 1877, 'Political Prophecy and Sociology for the National Review of 1899', the address on Economics 'to section F. of the British Association 1885', 'The Theory of Clerical Education from the volume on Liberal Education 1867', 'Idle Fellowship[s]' in the Contemporary [Review] of 1876, '[A] Lecture against Lecturing' from the New Review of 1890, an article on [Seeley's] Ecce Homo in the Westminster Review of 1866, 'The Prophet of Luther' in Macmillan's Magazine of 1867, 'The Economic Lessons of Socialism' in the Economic Journal of 1895, 'Economic Socialism' in the Contemporary Review of 1886 (though Nora thinks that the latter 'is probably practically superseded by Elements of Politics), a short appreciation of J.S. Mill's work on his death in 1873 (of which Mrs Marshall gave Nora a copy) in the Academy of 1873, and an article on sociology.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

MS notes dictated by Henry Sidgwick with regard to his work and what is to be done with it

In Nora Sidgwick's hand. Refers to his lectures on philosophical subjects, some of which he believes should be published. Suggests that a young man might be employed to work on some of them and that [James] Ward might read the proofs through 'and give advice on any point of difficulty.' Refers also to a number of lectures that he had intended to make into a book on Kant and Kantism in England, and also to works on [T. H. ] Green, agnosticism and relativism and two lectures on [Herbert] Spencer. Does not believe that the lectures on Epistemology 'in connection with [Christoph von] Sigwart' are worth publishing as a continuous whole, but thinks certain parts of them might be published as fragments. Suggests Ward's involvement, so long as he would not undertake too much work.

Refers also to his articles on ethics, printed and unprinted. Expresses his wish that the question of 'the usefulness to mankind' be the '[ ] principle for deciding on publication', and that the volume of the labour required should be taken into account also. Would like lectures that are not published to be handed over to anyone who may be lecturing on that particular subject, and mentions in particular some fragmentary lectures on his book on The Elements of Politics, which he would like to be offered to Th[ ] or Dickinson or divided between them.

Has done a good deal of reading for a book, The Development of European Polity, for which the plan is sketched 'in the first lecture of a pamphlet containing 3 printed lectures.' Has been his view 'more and more of late years that a three fold treatment of Political Science is desirable for [ ]', and lays out his theory. Would like the teachers of Political Science to be consulted on the possibility of working out his plans with the aid of his material. Again suggests that a young man might be paid to work on this matter. Expresses concern over expense, and states that he believes his work to be 'too sketchy and amateurish for it to be desirable to use it otherwise than as material.' Was comtemplating giving up the idea of publication so long as he held his chair 'feeling that the time and labour required to make it an adequately scholarly work would not be given [ ]' with his duty as a Professor of Moral Philosophy.'

Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900), philosopher

MS notes in Nora Sidgwick's hand

Includes the words that Henry would like to have said over his grave 'if it is decided not to have the Church of England service': 'Let us commend to the love of God with silent prayer the soul of a sinful man who partly tried to do his duty. It is by his wish that I say over his grave these words and no more'. Note that this was 'written down May 17 1900'.

Verses 'adopted by Henry Sidgwick. from Tennyson's Palace of Art when he left the Church of England in 1869', beginning with the lines: 'Yet pull not down my minster towers that were/So gravely gloriously wrought'. Page headed 'Henry's Texts', including [biblical] quotations.

Page headed 'Re new edition of Ethics'. Henry's desire is that, if he is not able to finish the revision, The Methods of Ethics 'be put through the press by Miss [E..E. C.] Jones without excerpts [he has] clearly indicated in the book itself or [his] MS notes of lectures that an alteration is required'. Suggests also the addition of a brief explanatory preface.

Additional notes relate to his works and the possibility of their publication. Believes that some of his philosophical works in which he attempts to define the scope of philosophy and its relation to, for example, psychology, logic, history and sociology, are most suitable for publication and study. Refers to a course of lectures on Kant, Green and Spencer 'which will be [more] easily brought out'. Refers also to a course of lectures on epistemology, which was delivered with Sigwart's Logic as a text book, and believes that part of it might be worth publishing. Suggests that [James] Ward might recommend someone who would read these works in order to select the portions he thought worth publishing. Insists, however, that Ward should not spend time on the matter that could be more profitably devoted to his own work. Discusses the difficulties that might be encountered in the publishing of his philosophical lectures, and refers to the part concerned with the relation of metaphysics and epistemology. Refers also to 'a discussion of Külpe's use of the terms and another discussion on idealism and realism, 'which will be found in the bundle relating to Külpe. List of some of Henry's works.

Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900), philosopher