Item 126 - Letter from Nora Sidgwick to James Ward

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ADD.MS.c/101/126

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Letter from Nora Sidgwick to James Ward

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  • 12 Feb 1906 (Creation)

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Claims to have meant to send 'these [articles]' sooner, but has been puzzling over the lectures on sociology, which she had mentioned, intending to send them also. Feels that she had better get 'a clearer picture of them and of their relation to published papers' before sending them.

With regards 'the Classical Review article' returns Dr Jackson's letter to Ward [not included], and sends one from J. B. Mayor to Henry Sidgwick . Asks him to return the latter at his leisure. Thinks that it would be a mistake to print the article in a collection of Henry's papers, as 'his part is so very short'. Adds, however, that Miss Sharpley, to whom she showed it 'is much charmed with it as an imitation of Plato'. States that Henry's part 'only brings out one point and [one has] no means of knowing whether he admitted Grote's answer to it to be sufficient - whether the G[ ] of the latter part of the whole paper can be considered as representing Henry's view or not.' Speculates as to the circumstances under which the discussion took place, and suggests it took place at Trumpington. Thinks that the article should be referred to in any bibliography and that a bibliography 'ought to be given either in the volume of fragments or in the biography....'

Also sends him the 1871 number of the Contemporary Review, 'containing the article on Verification of Beliefs...and one in the Nineteenth Century for 1880 on Historical Psychology'. Remarks that Henry was rather dissatisfied with the second one when it appeared. In relation to 'Miss Jones', states that she believes that Henry 'intended her to judge about publication [or] republication of Ethical matter in the same way that he asked [Ward] to do about philosophical work.' Thinks that she is 'a little too much inclined to publish' and considers trying to argue with her about any particular paper before a final decision is come to.' States that 'of course the question of republishing all the papers in Mind or all the notices of books is not purely a question of Ethics. Adds that 'in deciding about Ethical or Philosophical papers or anything else [they] must have regard to the whole amount to be published and the arrangement of volumes and must therefore talk it over all together to some extent.'

Announces that she envisages the publication of two volumes; one of 'philosophical and ethical etc fragments and essays for students' and one of 'more literary essays suited to the general public, and no more', and that the second would probably be entirely reprints. Lists the works possibly to be included in the first volume, including Kant lectures, Green lectures, Ethical papers, lectures on Sociology, articles on the Sophists in the Journal of Philology, the 'Dialogue in Mind on Time and Common sense', 'the articles in the Contemporary and XIXth Century sent with the letter [not included], Ethical articles in Mind, and 'some lectures on Kant's Ethics'.

States that the 'popular volume edited by A[rthur] S[idgwick] would probably be small', and would probably contain a review of Clough in the Westminster Review of 1869, an article on Bentham in the Fortnightly of 1877, 'Political Prophecy and Sociology for the National Review of 1899', the address on Economics 'to section F. of the British Association 1885', 'The Theory of Clerical Education from the volume on Liberal Education 1867', 'Idle Fellowship[s]' in the Contemporary [Review] of 1876, '[A] Lecture against Lecturing' from the New Review of 1890, an article on [Seeley's] Ecce Homo in the Westminster Review of 1866, 'The Prophet of Luther' in Macmillan's Magazine of 1867, 'The Economic Lessons of Socialism' in the Economic Journal of 1895, 'Economic Socialism' in the Contemporary Review of 1886 (though Nora thinks that the latter 'is probably practically superseded by Elements of Politics), a short appreciation of J.S. Mill's work on his death in 1873 (of which Mrs Marshall gave Nora a copy) in the Academy of 1873, and an article on sociology.

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