Mostrando 54 resultados

Descripción archivística
Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick
Imprimir vista previa Ver :

Henry Sidgwick: letters to Nora Sidgwick about Sidgwick's illness and death; letters to Sidgwick from his mother Mary; other letters and printed material

1-93: letters to Nora Sidgwick about Henry Sidgwick's illness and death
94-133: miscellaneous correspondence and printed papers of Henry Sidgwick, many relating to the debate about compulsory Greek at Cambridge.
134-190: letters to Henry Sidgwick from his mother Mary
191-194: letters from Henry Sidgwick to Spencer Baynes regarding his article on ethics for the Encyclopædia Britannica

Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900), philosopher

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks him for his letter from Antwerp, which delighted her with its 'cheerful happy tone'. Refers to the letters that have arrived for him; one from Reginald Hanson, asking Henry if he could read with him the following term; one from Mr Bradley, asking Henry's opinion on Dakyns as a possible [headmaster] for his lower school; one from Miss Attersoll, thanking him for the wedding cards. Reports that she received a letter from Minnie and Edward, who are travelling in Europe. They had a very calm passage to Boulogne, passed through Amiens and Paris, and were moving on to Rheims towards the end of the previous week. Believes that they are now making their way to Lucerne. Lists the other location where they intend to be in the coming weeks, with the dates.

Reports that only herself and Matilda [Sidgwick?] are all that remain of their 'large party'. States that Matilda, who was in bed all Saturday from exhaustion, is to stay with her until the following Thursday or Friday. States that she has heard nothing of letting her house. Claims that she should prefer staying the year [at Rugby] to going anywhere else, if it were not for the expenses. Reports that Fanny Green left her that day, 'after employing herself most diligently in collecting + packing in a beautiful style, all dear Minnie's things - 9 large cases left for Wellington College [that day].' Discusses her feelings in relation to Minnie's departure. Remarks that as each of her children seem to be taking their place in the world, she can 'the more calmly contemplate [her] removal from it.' Relates that the previous day she, Fanny Green and Matilda heard the new curate preach.

Expects only news of Henry's arrival in Dresden 'and that all is [ ] and quiet there', as she knows how busy he will be. Asks him to give her kindest regards to Mr and Mrs [Henry and Fanny] Dale when he sees them, and tells him to let them hear about the wedding. Claims that she treasures up all that he tells her about foreign manners and customs. Expects to see William and Arthur on the following Wednesday or Thursday, and announces that the following day they are going to Keswick for three weeks, and that Elizabeth 'will follow [them] when she has made all comfortable at home', and will pay visits with her in Yorkshire. Reports that they have good weather in Rugby. Remarks that the house seems very quiet since the previous Monday. Tells him not to overwork himself, nor to sit up late, and to take plenty of air, rest and refreshment. Sends Matilda's love.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her happiness at receiving his last letter. Reports that she received a letter from Mr Dale, and that there was no mention of Henry in i; is glad that he is well, and is enjoying his German life, in spite of his hay fever. Claims to like the neighbourhood very much, and to enjoy the physical exertions in which she takes part. Reports that the previous day she, Elizabeth, Arthur and William 'went the Wat[ ] expedition; she and Arthur on ponies, while the others walked. Refers to the scenery and to the weather. States that they have had heavy rain for some hours, which obliged them to stay in doors. Reports that Arthur 'looks weak and unequal to much', and believes that he has given up the idea of walking in Switzerland. Expects to be at Shipton by the end of the month, and thinks that Arthur might also go to see some friends in that direction, while William prepares for his Swiss trip. Does not think that she will let her house at all now.

Reports that she had a very pleasant letter from Minnie and Edward, 'dated Bâle 5th July.' They had been to Rheims, and then had travelled via Strasbourg to Bâle, and were to be at Lucerne on Sunday 10 July, at Grindelwald on Sunday 17 July and the following Sunday at Cham[ ]. They are to be at Cormayeur on 31 July, and at Bourges on 7 August, and home before 12 August.

Likes the Wrights very much; Miss Wright gives her any help she wants in the little Botany she can do. She thought that William was willing to look at plants with her, but finds that he does not seem to care at all about it now that they are there. Describes their physical activities, and reports that William and Arthur have been up Skiddaw, and refers to the Buttermere excursion, in which she participated. Claims to feel better since going there [to Cumberland], and to be pleased with C[ ] Church too, but 'not so much with Bp Villiers of Carlisle who preached for the Clergy [Aid] Soc[iety]' the previous Sunday.

Reports that Elizabeth came to them on Saturday after she had settled matters at home and taken her niece to Wellington College; she 'had the pleasure of unpacking dear Minnie' boxes which [they] had sent and of hanging up some of her smart gowns in her wardrobe!' Remarks that it seems to her 'even yet very like a dream' that Minnie has left her, and she resolves never to think of it painfully, thought she admits that it is hard at times. Discusses her thoughts on how one should conduct oneself at the end of one's life. Reports that she has just been hearing from Miss Wright 'a touching account of that [sad] 29th Sept. 1857. when that [ ] accident happened to the Bernards, in which a little boy [James Henry George Bernard] was apparently killed. In the account refers to [Charles?] Tawney, Alexander Laurence 'and his [insensible] brother]', and also to Dr Bernard and his wife. Reports that the whole family have now left and are gone to live at Harrow. States that the Wrights 'had just heard that Charles Bernard and Sir Alexander Laurence have killed a tiger near Bombay, and have received much praise for the same.

Encloses a letter for Mr Dale [not included], which she wishes Henry to give to him. Asks him to write again before he leaves Dresden, and to tell her where he is going. Thinks that they shall leave Keswick on 28 July, and then on to [ ], [ ], Furness and R[ ], and shall get to the Raikes on Saturday 30 July. Informs him that after that letters may be directed to her [at the Wrights in Cumberland].

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at the news, which she heard from Henry's aunt Stephana, that he had been elected as a Fellow of Trinity, and appointed Assistant Tutor. Adds that she heard that his examination papers were the best, and states how proud of him she is. Declares that she is thankful also that Arthur enters on his new life with Henry by his side, and is glad of the good example he has set him.

States that she is on her way home, and shall be there on 22 or 24 October, and then goes to Wellington College. Thinks that Minnie would like to see her, and presumes that all Edward's friends will have had time to pay their visits. States that she hears on all sides of their happiness, and wants to see it for herself. Reports that Henry's aunt Henrietta is there [in Leeds], but that she goes to Bedford the following day to see his uncle and aunt [William and Stephana Crofts], and then proceeds to Brighton.

Encourages to bring any friend of him home for Christmas. Hopes that he will stay 'all the time at Rugby' as she will be very glad for all the family to be together once more. Reports that '[p]oor little Ellen' is very poorly with a fever. Asks him to give her love to Arthur and to tell him to write to her in Leeds until the end of the following week. Adds that Willy Croft's report for the [Doctor] is excellent. Asks to be remembered to all his friends, and that her congratulations be passed on to Mr Somerset. Does not think she knows Bowen. Wishes she had seen Father's name [on the list of elected fellows], and sends her particular remembrances to him and his brother.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Apologises for having neglected to write to him. Declares that her time at Wellington College has passed pleasantly, but has been devoid of incident. Refers to Minnie's happiness with Edward, and to her domestic activities. Remarks that Edward, although not ill now, needs rest. Looks forward to 'the happy Rugby Xmas', and declares that she is glad she kept on the house there. Is very glad that Henry will be at home all the vacation, and hopes that he will ask [A. J.] Patterson to come. Explains that during the latter half of the vacation Edward and Minnie and William will be gone, and suggests that he invites his friends then. States that she will ask William about his friends when she passes through Oxford the following Thursday, when she is to meet Lucy Brown and lunch with her in William's rooms.

Reports that Mr [Francis?] Martin has just been [at Wellington College], and told her that Henry is looking 'remarkably well'. Adds that she thinks that Henry should be doing lighter work. Tells him not to let Arthur work too hard. Reports that William was at Wellington College that previous Sunday, looking very well. Refers to 'the appointment [of H. M Butler as new headmaster] to Harrow', and remarks that '26 sounds very young', but that she hears that Butler 'is a very fit man.' Is glad to hear that Henry comes home on 15 [December]. Asks him to give the enclosed [not included] to Arthur.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Is very glad that Henry [and Arthur] are coming home [to Rugby] the following week 'to warm this cold empty house.' Reports that she is well, but that she hears that Minnie has a cold. Refers to imminent weddings: Mr Smythies. and Miss I. Anstey; Miss Atty and an Indian gentleman [i.e a British army officer who has served in India]; Miss [Sale] and 'a Mr. Smith'; and Miss Wratislaw. Urges to bring some copies of the photograph he mentioned, as she wants them for her self, and also for their 'old servant Hannah', who she hopes will come for Christmas. Asks if there is a photograph of Isaac [Barns]. Is pleased to hear of Arthur. Asks if he got Margaret's wedding cards from [Riddlesdon], and states that she 'really became "Mrs Cooper" on that day'. Saw Miss Attersoll at Wellington College; refers to her views on young headmasters. Adds that she hears that Mr Butler's appointment [as headmaster of Harrow] is very satisfactory. Refers to A. J. Patterson's impending visit. Asks Henry to thank Arthur for his letter, and to tell him 'to fix about his visit to Lee Warner' when he comes to Rugby. Also asks him to bring Arthur's certificate for the exhibition home.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she has been 'on the move' since Henry's letter reached her. Reports that William joined her at Aylesford on Thursday 28 June, and then they went to Rugby, where they spent a day with Mr and Mrs Dakyns. They then went to Llangollen. Describes their journey by coach to Capel Curig. Reports that William almost reached the top of Snowdon. Intends to write to Henry's aunt at Wellington College to see if she could receive him, and suggests that if she cannot, that he might come to her in Wales. Informs him of her plans to return to Wellington College, and states that Elizabeth [Cooper?] will be there the following week.

States that she was sorry to find that Mr and Mrs [Charles and Susanna?] Arnold had left Rugby, and that she did not whom else he 'could ask about Heidelbergh'. Suggests that C[hristopher?] Benson might know whether it is damp or not. Asks Henry to send her a book that 'will take a good deal of reading', and yet which she can understand. Suggest the 'Dialogues of Plato'. Relates a story which she heard from Captain [Cheese] at Aylesford about Mrs [Mary?] Pollard Urq[uhart] - 'a connexion of the [Thomas Hill?] Greens - who reported hearing 'distinct footsteps near her without her seeing any one', and also hearing 'a shrill scream equally unaccountable'. Offers to send 'names + places' if he is interested. Asks him to send her some poetry also. Inquires as to whether he has heard from Arthur, and if Mr [J. B.?] Lightfoot is gone.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports on her guests - those from Skipton, Miss Attersoll and Mr Boyd. States that Miss Attersoll has been trying to infuse into her 'a clearer idea of the state of public affairs in Church and State.' Announces that Lucy Brown and Henry's Aunt Sidgwick are also to arrive. Asks him when she may expect him and Arthur, and whether it would be possible to go down to Brighton for a few days before coming home. Reports that his aunt [Henrietta?] has been ill, and that 'perhaps a familiar face [would] cheer her.' Hopes that Henry is well, and that he will not take as many pupils the following term. Declares that Lucy Brown 'thinks much of [Hawthorne's] Scarlet Letter.' Reports on a 'remarkable sermon' given by Dr Temple, and that Lee Warner says that he [Temple] is going to publish all he has preached [at Rugby]. Asks Henry to tell Arthur to write to her to tell her how he is, and hopes that he is not overworked. Refers to Graham Dakyns, who 'seems quite downhearted about his place', and asks if there is any cause for it. Reports that Elizabeth [Cooper?] 'was sadly knocked up at Xmas, 'and will suffer from it for long'.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Writes from Mrs Dakyns' house. Reports on the weather, and on the state of Elizabeth [Cooper?]'s health. Asks him why he doesn't send the photographs. Announces that she goes to Wellington College the following Monday, and wishes to have them before she goes. Undertakes to tell him 'by what [train? ]' they come to Cambridge.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Announces that she is back in Wellington College, having left William at Chester on his way to the Raikes [Robert Hodgson Sidgwick's house at Skipton]. States that he goes to Oxford, and then abroad, his final destination being Florence. Refers to the enclosed [letter; not included]. Reports that after leaving Beddgelert they went to Carnarvon, then to Bangor, and on to Llandudno. Adds that at Llandudno they met a group of relations - her brothers William and John, with their respective families, 'the M[ ]s - B[ ] - and Miss M[ ] and Miss [Wraith].' Reports that Minnie is very well. Announces that the [Grand] Speech day is on the following Tuesday. Remarks that Edward needs rest and a holiday. Adds that Elizabeth is there also. Also refers to Rugby. Asks him to tell her about spirit-rapping. Reports that she heard good news from Arthur, and that he is enjoying his sojourn immensely. Includes his address in Ambleside. States that '[t]hey are all charmed with Mr. Lightfoot', and describes his and Arthur's activities throughout the day. Asks Henry to tell her how he likes Berlin, and adds that there were no letters from Mrs [Susanna?] Arnold.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Minnie gave birth to 'a very nice plump little boy' that morning', and is well. States that Edward was away for the birth. Adds that Elizabeth claims that the baby is like William. Refers to Henry's letter, and states that they are all astonished at his 'cheap board and lodging with instruction', but expresses concern about 'those dreadful scourges' which afflict him by night. Is grateful for his description of 'the strange ceremony at Aix.' Hopes that he will find a companion to travel with. Announces that Edward 'is emancipated now and in a few days, all being well with Minnie and his babe'. Adds that he intends to go to Marlborough for a few days and the following week to join the party at Nab Cottage for a week. States that Mr Lightfoot has induced him to do so, and she is sure that it will do him good. Complains that the weather is very gloomy. Reports that Edward was not very well when his boys went away, and she does not think he has fully recovered yet. Remarks on Minnie's selflessness with regard to Edward. Reports that she has heard from William, and is now writing to him at Innsbruck, where she supposes he and Mr [Francis?] Otter will be in a week's time. Adds that he wrote from Munich, and had seen Henry's friends Cowell and Browning on their way to him. Sends Edward's and Minnie's love to him.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports again on the birth of a son to Minnie and Edward. Explains that the latter had gone to preach to Mr C[ ]'s at [Denbies] to preach at his church that day. Reports that Minnie is well, and that the baby is in good health. In relation to his name states that 'Martin', 'Edward White' and 'Arthur' have been suggested. Reports that the previous Saturday Edward went to spend some time with Mr Bradley at Marlborough, and then went to Tong, where he intended to spend the night with Emmeline [Woodhouse, his sister], and then on to Nab Cottage. Is of the opinion that Edward needed a break from Wellington College and all its attendant problems.

States that the following week Arthur, Trevelyan, Lee [Warner?], St[ ] and others accompany Mr Lightfoot and Edward to W[ast ]water 'en knapsack, weather permitting...' Adds that he must be home before 14 September when the College opens. Reports that Arthur has not been well, and has been suffering from his circulation. Announces that a trip to the Tyrol is not to go ahead, and that Trevelyan is going with him to Scarborough when their 'Lake Expedition' is over. Reports that she has not heard from William since she received a letter dated 16 August from Vienna, after which they were going to Innsbruck, and then on to Florence. Reports that she received a letter from Ada [Benson], who 'seems to be making progress'. She had been dining with Mr and Mrs Sergent, and the former's sister. Had hoped that Henry would come to Dresden.

Hears from Mrs S[ ] that a new master is soon to be appointed at Rugby. Relates that some days ago Edward received a letter 'from the author of [Other]Footsteps on the boundaries [of another world etc etc. - enclosing an account of the dreams connected with the Italian boy', which she believes Mr Eagles told them some years previously. States that 'Mr Owen has heard these dreams as connected with the family of a Mr. Benson - formerly a "Teacher at Rugby" and so writes to ascertain the truth'. Asks if Henry can help. Informs him that a bill came for him from Warwick's some days previously, and asks him what she should do about it. Reports that his uncle Christopher [Sidgwick?] was at Wellington College a fortnight previously, that the Raikes [party?: ie Robert Sidgwick and family] have been at Whitby, and also that the Riddlesden [home of John Sidgwick] ladies are going there.

Relates that Henry Longsdon and his family 'have been living for some weeks at a clerical hotel in London', and are travelling in Derbyshire, and that Fanny [Henry Sidgwick's cousin] goes home soon and will stay at Seacroft until Henry decides whether he will take the [ ] Secretaryship. Reports that William Lace [another cousin] and his family are at Stone Gappe, and that 'he is soon going to attend a social science meeting in Scotland'. States that her friends at Rugby keep looking for a house for her. Asks about Henry's progress with German.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Claims to have been anxious about his welfare, and that she had often thought about him the previous week, wondering which day he was crossing the channel. Reports that she left his aunt [Henrietta?] at Brighton the previous Friday when she came to Bedford through London, having spent a fortnight with her, and that the latter invites Henry to come to visit her. Reports that Minnie, Elizabeth and the baby are now gone to Brighton, out of the way, she presumes of measles which seems quite an epidemic in Wellington College. Hopes that Edward has not caught the infection. Hopes that Henry got their joint letter at Frankfurt and that he enjoyed his travels and his introduction to the [ ]. Asks after his and Arthur's health.

Intends to go and see Mr and Mrs C. Ward at Stapleton near Bristol when she leaves Bedford, and then paying a few visits before settling where her winter quarters are to be. Reports that his aunt says that she would be delighted if he and Arthur could come for a Sunday. Encloses the receipt of the bill paid at Warwick's [not included], and tells him that he can repay her when they meet. Reports that Aunt Lace is there, and that all join in sending their love to him.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she is at Saltford House near Bath to visit Julia[na] Kelly (née Boyd), formerly of Burfield Priory, who married after the Sidgwicks left Clifton. Announces that she is on her way to see Mr and Mrs C. Ward [perhaps the brother of Henry's aunt Mary Jane Sidgwick, and his wife] at Stapleton, and then is going on to Cheltenham to see Mr and Mrs Lace. Reports that she got both Henry's and Arthur's letters at Bedford, and that she found William at Oxford, suffering from a toothache. Adds that they discussed their winter gathering, and that William was agreeable to the proposal of staying at Sydenham. States that Henry's Aunt Croft's sister and her husband are about to take up their residence there. Asks for Henry's and Arthur's opinion. Mentions that Wellington College was proposed as a meeting place for all the family on Christmas Day, and states that she has written to Minnie to ask her about her plans.

Intends to go to Rugby to enquire about a house. Regrets that Henry could not see Minnie and her baby. Reports that Elizabeth 'still continues to take the place of nurse....' Thinks that Henry's uncle at Bedford [William Crofts] would be glad to see him, and suggests that Henry might give him 'some useful hints about his son William as to the books he ought to have....' Explains that the latter is in Mr Fanshawe's first class and has a good chance of an exhibition. Would like to hear about Henry's German experiences. Describes her time with her friend Julia as quiet, but adds that there is little to do. States that she meant to see Old King's Parade and 'and all the neighbours who still remain', and that she might get to see Miss Powell.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she has been 'a little out of sorts' since they arrived in Ambleside. Describes the position of Miss Clough's house, and the surrounding countryside. Reports that it is very wet that day, but that the previous day they were on the Lake for two hours. Thinks that Arthur looks 'comfortable well', and that William is better than she expected. Reports that Mr Wheatly Balme 'and his Bride' came to visit the previous day. Explains that the latter's brother is Vicar of Mirfield.

States that Arthur expected his friend Myers from P[ ] that morning, but that he had not appeared. Reports that they have newspapers and many books to keep them occupied. Describes a very hot day that she spent with Minnie and Bessie [Cooper?]. Refers to a conversation she had with Henry on D[ ]ham Down. Claims to have thought about his future life, and refers to the plan he mentioned at Brighton. Thinks of staying at Rugby for the present, where she 'could live comfortable whilst alone...' and states that his plans ought to take a more definite shape before she makes a move. Refers to a fire in London. Reports that Katie Lace is with her [in Ambleside], and sends her love to Henry.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

States that his last letter was quite a relief to her, as his previous one had been somewhat painful to receive, and she had not heard from him since. Declares that she feels much happier about him now, and assures him that she shall hold sacred whatever he tells her on the subject. States that she is still at Hillary Place, in Leeds, and fears that she shall not be within his reach before Term begins, as she had arranged to return into C[raven], and then make her way to London and on to Wellington College, where she shall be staying for a little while in November. Intends to take lodgings somewhere for the winter.

Thinks it would be best for Henry to go on with his present work until something that he really prefers and for which he feels fit for presents itself. Admonishes Henry for his silence, and declares what a pleasure the receipt of a letter is to those 'who look forward to a solitary life after one of anxious tho' delightful work for others during the last 28 years.' Announces that she is off to A[rnaliffe] the following day, and shall be there for about ten days, and then goes on to Stone Gappe. [Incomplete]

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her appreciation for his letter, which she received after seeing Mr [William] Boyd and Charles to the station, and explains that the presence of friends prevented her from writing to him. Reports that his Aunt [ ] came to stay, as did [John?] William, Katie and Annie Lace. She went with the latter three to Oxford, where she saw Mr Boyd at Merton College and Mrs Boyd and Charles at University College. Reports that Charles has been unwell.

Reports that she had been to Rugby, and that when she entered the house - Mr T. Evans' old one' - the servant told her that her master [Mr Palmer] 'was not quite sure that he was going away!!' States that she has since had 'an uncertain letter from Ladkin'. Is anxious that her family should have some place to call home. Reports that Fergus Moultrie is ill. States that she received a letter from Miss Mackenzie that day, and that Mrs Moberly has called upon her twice.

Reports that Henry's Aunt Ellen intends to pay her a visit for her last ten days in Leamington, and that she hopes to have Lucy Brown to visit as well. Asks him to tell her when his Easter vacation is. Hears that Henry's Aunt Lace is 'decidedly better', and that John Henry is still at home, no tutor having yet been found for him. Reports on the schooling arrangements for Robert, Alfred, Tryphosa and Julia, and remarks on how troublesome it is 'when you have very dull children to deal with!'

Announces that she is very anxious to have some absorbing book; refers to Herbert Spencer's book which William mentioned to her, and asks Henry to send it to her. Is very pleased to hear about Bernard. States that she has good accounts from Wellington College; that Minnie and Edward are both well, and that the baby's vocabulary is increasing. Remarks on the fact that Lord Derby is elected President of the College. States the report of Mr U[mpleby]'s death at Bolton Abbey is false, and that Christ Church, Skipton has a new incumbent, Mr Clarke, and that there is much anxiety about the appointment of a vicar of Bingley.

Reports that Henry's Aunt Mary Jane [Sidgwick] has been visiting her brother at Bathford, and that during her absence his Uncle Robert has been paying Mr Balme a visit at Cole Wall. States that times for the mills are very bad and that there are many unemployed people. Claims that she knows no one in Leamington, and does not like to ask for an introduction to Mr Martin's brother and sister. Reports that Ada Benson is now with the Dales at Dresden, and that she is better. Complains about the sermons she has heard in Leamington. Is glad that Arthur is well, and hopes that Henry is too, and asks if it is true that Sh[ ] has come to Cambridge. Reports that Mr Boyd has given her a beautiful book for Carte de Visite photographs, and encourages Henry to get his done for her. States that she has not yet seen Mrs Dakyns, but hopes to do so soon.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Hopes that the letter reaches him, as she hears from Mrs Dakyns that he is moving his quarters. Reports that she left Brighton ten days previously and went to Rugby, and then on to Bedford. States that her work on her new house was not as advanced as she had expected, but hopes that it will be ready soon. Has offered their old servant Fanny Ladbrook some weeks' work, for which the latter was very grateful as she has had to leave her home, her husband having become a bankrupt.

Elizabeth is to come 'with the dear babies' from Wellington College, and they are to stay with her while Minnie and Edward are abroad with Mr Martin. Imagines that they will be in London the following day 'to see the Exhibition.' Announces that the following morning she is going with a group of ten 'to Town to have [her] first sight of the Exhibition....'

Reports that William met her at Rugby and helped her with the arrangements for the new house. Remarks that everyone she had known well there seemed gone. Describes the house as 'very tiny', but intends to make it comfortable, and hopes that the family 'shall have many happy days all together in it.' Remarks on the hot weather which they are experiencing. Discusses William's plans to see the Exhibition, and a possible trip to Wales or his joining a reading party, including Mr Ellis, at Harwich. Claims that she has heard nothing about the route that Mr Martin intends taking with Minnie and Edward, and suggests that Henry may meet them somewhere.

Confesses to having read no newspapers for a week, on account of the appalling news from America contained therein [the Civil War]. Reports that Henry's Aunt Henrietta is there in Bedford on her way to Yorkshire. Reports that Willy [Carr Crofts] was 'first after the 2 Exhibitions [and] the Examination' and received great praise from Mr Fanshawe for his Latin composition. Adds that the girls have grown much. States that she told Henry's Uncle Lace about him having been spoken of in the Isle of Man.

Reports that she has just heard from Minnie that she and Edward intend to set out on their tour about 7 August, and that they will be about a month away. They think of going through Normandy, and then to Auvergne and 'down South'. Would like to know how Henry is, and how long he intends to remain abroad. Reports that Arthur and his party reached Oban the week before the previous one, and 'are located at a Mr. [William?] Ralston's...' Sends kind remembrances to Graham [Dakyns].

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Admits that she could not resist opening Arthur's letter to Henry to see if there was one for her also, and, finding none, read it. Hopes that the '[Sen: Op.]' will come after all, and reports that the packet came the previous day. Reports that Edward left them that morning for L[ ], where he had to see a dentist, and hopes to reach Wellington College that evening. Refers to Mr Martin also. Reports that Minnie and the children hope to go home the following day if they hear from Mr Barford that the measles is no longer a threat. Announces that Elizabeth returns to her in about a month. Adds that William will tell Henry 'that Katie Lace is engaged to Mr Wawn!' Doubt that the Cononley curacy 'can possible keep 2 people.'

Reports that Henry's Aunt Henrietta came [to Rugby] the previous night, and will stay a few days before going on to Leeds. Urges Henry to come to visit her at Easter. Reports that Mr Conington sent her Deerbrook, [by Harriet Martineau] which she intends to read at the first opportunity.

Additional note: Sends 'the enclosed [her letter to Henry, above, and letter from Arthur to Henry - not included] with most frantic apologies.' Reports that she did two problems that morning , which has made her feel better.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she has been very busy with domestic matters. Claims to be 'more than satisfied with what Arthur has done....' Remarks that there are 'some friends in out of the way places, who seem always to think that any Cambridge man of note ought to be a Wrangler...' and claims to set them right when she can. Was glad to hear from William that Arthur looked so well, and that they all had such a pleasant time at Oxford, and wishes that she could have listened to [their] 'eloquent Professor [Henry Smith? see 99/21] behind some curtain.'

Reports that she had just had a nice letter from Annie Brown, 'in which she complains sadly of Longman for making her last book - Problems in Human Nature, so dear', and of the fact that no one has reviewed it. Asks Henry to write one, and also to lend Brown a copy of Coventry Patmore's Angel in the House. Quotes her remarks on Henry's paper on De Tocqueville. Asks if he could get an introduction to Mr Kingsley for a young man who greatly admires him, for Brown also. Asks if he has read [Margaret Oliphant's] The Chronicles of Carlingford and asks his opinion on them. Reports that she has read Deerbrook [by Harriet Martineau], and gives her thoughts on its subject, i.e., the damaging effects of the interference of a third person in the loves of others. [Incomplete].

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Announces that her time in York is drawing to a close, and asks Henry when he plans to come to Rugby and if his friend Mr Cowell is coming with him. Thinks of going to see some friends in Craven. Reports that her sister [Elizabeth?] has not been very well in the past week. States that Mrs McKenzie, the [ ] lady comes there the following Tuesday to take her [Mary's] place. Fears that her presence there did not do her sister the good she had hoped it would. States that she has little to report as she has seen very few people, and has not been reading much. Claims that she has had very few letters, and none from Rugby.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks him for his last letter, and explains that she could not answer before leaving Rugby for Wellington College. Reports that Arthur went to Cambridge for the Fellowship Examination, the result of which is probably not to be known until the following Friday. States that his chances of success are increased by Mr [Joseph?] Romilly's death. Adds that Mr [J. L.?] Hammond came to Rugby to take his work for the week. Reports that William spent a few days with his Aunt, and then came to Wellington College. Thinks that he is better.

Reports that the family at the College are well, and that Edward is looking 'quite portly', and Minnie 'stout and strong', and the children, Martin, Arthur and the baby [Nellie], healthy also, having benefitted from their time at the sea at Swanage. Announces that she is to stay there longer than she had intended, and that if he decides to go home to Rugby he will find a bed, but will not see her. Suggests that if there was space at Wellington College he could come there.

Expresses her delight at his promise of the stamps of the German states, and states that her little friend will be very pleased. Refers also to the stamped envelopes which Henry wants for Miss [Meta?] Benfey.

14 Oct: Refers to Henry's letter from Lille. Reports that Arthur got his fellowship, as have [Henry] Jackson and [William Knyvet] Wilson, and that she is delighted for Arthur. States that William returns to Oxford that day, and that at Merton there is a fourth tutor, 'which will make the work less hard for him.' Reports that at Rugby they are still in the old house, and may have to wait until the following summer to get Mrs Leicester's house. Refers to the letter that Dr Temple sent to the Masters, and reports that it caused great discussion in Rugby. Discusses the matter, adding that letters 'are often appearing in the Rugby Advertizer recommending a speedy and thorough ventilation of the whole subject.' Explains that doctors and lawyers don't like the mixture of their class with the trades people, and so could not avail themselves of the proposed middle school, and that 'they want to retain the privilege of Foundation, and send their children to the other school free of charge.' Thinks that she may benefit from the fact that houses are not letting so well, and get a cheaper house.

Is grateful for the stamps, and is trying to get those which his friends want. Asks whether she should send the stamps to Fraulein Benfey or to him. Hopes that he will take Professor Ewald's advice and go on with studying Hebrew. Thinks of trying German herself. Hopes that he will come home as soon as he can at the end of term, for otherwise he will not see Arthur. Reports that Edward and Minnie are both plump and well, and that the former is in the midst of his scholarship examinations. Refers also to the children, who 'grow apace'. Reports on the progress of the Master's house in Rugby.

Reports that his Aunt [Lace] has been to Scarborough and is now near York, and that she seems 'so weak in bodily health'. Hopes for a recovery, however, for the sake of her husband and children. Intends to be at Wellington College for about another fortnight, and then will go back to Rugby or to Brighton. Claims to be better than she was, and able to do more and walk more. Asks him to let him know as soon as he gets to Cambridge. Announces that Mr Martin arrives the following day and will stay for a fortnight. Reports that Alfred Sidgwick is now at the Schoolhouse and likes it very much, and that all the 'Elders' of the Sidgwick family were well when she last heard.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that she has written to [Sampson?] Mordan, asking him to send Henry two or three gold pens to try, and tells him to send back the rest when he has chosen one; Arthur has at last got one that suits him. Reports on her re-arrangement of books, and states that Arthur has 'the wee room over the kitchen as a small sanctum....' Reports that Arthur was very happy with the result of the Dresden expedition that he went on with [F.E.] Kitchener. Refers to the imminent weddings of two of their young masters [at Rugby School]: the marriage of Mr Potts and Miss B[owden] Smith, and Mr Bond and Miss Cram, the sister of Mrs Elsee.

Reports that Ada [Benson] is staying at Rugby, and claims that she is glad to have her and to know her better. Thinks that 'there is much good in her and a great deal of thought', but still believes 'that girls develop better under home influences until past 20....' Refers to Mr and Mrs [Jex-?] Blake and their feelings about Professor and Mrs Benfey and Göttingen.

Refers to Henry's last letter, and discusses the dangers of mental inactivity. Is glad that Henry is to see William, who will tell him about a plan for her to see Switzerland that year. Thinks that Arthur knows of Emilia in England [novel by Meredith, later renamed Sandra Belloni], but undertakes to tell him of it anyway. Asks whether he takes Macmillan's Magazine as he used to, and asks him to send them to her. Offers to send him some orange marmalade. Reports that all is well at Wellington College, and states that she shall be there about the end of May.

Announces that one of Henry's Stone Gappe cousins - Algernon - is preparing to emigrate to British Caffraria [the Cape Colony/South Africa] in a few weeks. Reports that Henry's Aunt is now in a private place 'called the "Retreat" near York, and that his Uncle and Aunt Crofts from Leeds are that week at Brighton.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Passes on a request from his Aunt Sidgwick [Sarah Hannah or Mary Jane?] to make the acquaintance of a young man called Brayshaw who goes to St. John's College. Explains that she [Mary Sidgwick] knew his father [now dead] in former days, and that his widow and three daughters live near Riddlesden. Refers to the fact that Arthur is to visit on the following Saturday, and asks Sidgwick to send her word when he is intending to go to Rugby and for how long. Asks where he intends to go in Yorkshire. Announces that Katie Lace and Mr Wawn are to be married on 27 April, and are to honeymoon in Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Cheltenham. Remarks that neither she nor Henry's Aunt are asked to the wedding. Reports that she has had Miss Brown (Lucy's eldest sister) staying at Rugby for three weeks. The latter's sister Annie has written another book, whose publisher, Longman, thinks will sell. Fears that the book, Wanted: a Home will not be a success.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she was about to write to him the previous Tuesday morning when 'Arthur suddenly came in from the Racquet Court having had a terrible blow on his left eye....' Reports that Dr Sharp was sent for, who assured that the injury was not as serious as they thought, and states that Arthur has been improving ever since. Reports that Henry's Aunt H[enrietta] is there [at Rugby], and she plays to Arthur. States that the Masters are 'most kind about his work, which, for the most part is taken amongst them.'

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Arthur is recovering well from his eye injury, and that only a certain weakness remains. States that he has been out once as far as Bilton, and that Dr Sharp says that he may go into the school about the middle of the week. States that Henry's Aunt Henrietta is still at Rugby, and that they go to London together on 2 or 3 June, and then she will go on to Wellington College, while Henrietta goes to Brighton. Announces that Katie and her husband Mr Wawn are coming to Rugby from Derbyshire on the following Friday, to stay until 30 May, when they will go to Cheltenham.

Reports that Henry's cousin Algernon Lace sailed for British Caffraria [the Cape Colony/South Africa] the previous week, and that there has been no further report of his sick Aunt Lace. Neither has there been 'news of any importance from C[raven]', apart from the fact that Henry's Uncle Robert 'is going in conjunction with John Davy to take Uncle James' share of the business', as the latter is retiring due to illness.

Reports that the question of the Foundation at Rugby is being 'hotly discussed', and that the previous Friday Dr Temple went up to give his report to the Select Committee. Refers to the fact that Henry's cousin W.C. Crofts of Bedford has obtained a scholarship at Brasenose of £74 per annum for four years, and remarks that the college is less expensive than Merton. Asks Henry how he finds his gold pen, and asks him to recommend a good new novel. She wants some books to read to Minnie whilst she is in her room.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that their 'long-talked of Trip' has been cancelled. Explains that William was exhausted by his examination work at Oxford and was not fit for it. Reports that he came to Wellington College for a week, and left, intending to go to London, and then to join Arthur. It was agreed that she should join them in Wales with Lucy Brown, but states that neither of them have written. She goes home the following day. States that Mr Barford thought that William was suffering from 'a congested state of the Brain from over work', and advised that he rest. Hopes that William will see Dr [George?] Burrows in London. Claims that she has been very busy at Wellington College.

Thanks Henry for the French book he sent. Reports that Minnie and the baby are doing very well. Reports that the children would very much like to see Henry, as he will hear from Edward. Refers to 'the Elections', and states that she is glad that Trevelyan and J.S. Mill have been successful. Asks Henry if he can get him any autograph 'of great (not noble merely) men'. Claims that she has not heard of any of the books Henry mentions, [see 99/47] as they, at Wellington College, do not subscribe to any library now.

Hopes that they shall see Henry 'just when the school reopens', but suggests that he might be in Yorkshire at that time, and that, if so, he should come to them 'in the new house about the end of September'. Tells him to write to her Yorkshire friends when he is ready to go to them, and undertakes to prepare them for seeing him. Refers to the death of [Benson] Sidgwick's six-month old son [William] at Worthing the previous week, and to the imminent marriage of Annie Brown to 'a Mr Penny of Exeter'.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to household arrangements, which she hopes will be completed soon. Reports that William came to Rugby the previous Friday, and think that he will be there until he returns to Oxford on 14 October. Expects Henry and his friend Cowell on Tuesday 10 October, and tells him to let her know for certain when he is coming, and if he wants to have a small party for him. Announces that Arthur expects Mr [William?] Everett to come for a night or two also. Explains the accommodation situation with regards number of beds and bedrooms. Refers to a drowning in Cambridge [that of Henry John Purkiss, see 99/51], and claims that Mrs Rhoades told her that James [her son] knew the victim.

Reports that Arthur has had more information about Dr [Henry Weston?] Eve's resignation, 'and appears to think that the Fellowship is given up on religious grounds....' Adds that she has heard nothing from Wellington College. States that Arthur got [The Life and Writings of] Major Downing, but 'does not think much of it', and she claims to find it vulgar and dull. Asks Henry to send her send her the numbers of Macmillan's Magazine when he is finished with them. Reports on the health of both Arthur and William, and on the good weather that they are having in Rugby.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Claims to feel ashamed at not having written to him for so long. Reports that she has had a succession of friends, including Miss Attersoll, Mrs Plunkett, Henry's Aunt Henrietta, and Uncle William from Bedford, in Rugby for short visits, and these occupied a good deal of her time. Mrs Plunkett stayed on her way to Switzerland; her son Willoughby has got his commission and is gone to India with a regiment of the Royal Artillery. Announces that she expects Eleanor soon, and Henry's Aunt Ellen from Leeds on Saturday, and that the latter and his Aunt Henrietta go to Brighton on the following Tuesday.

Reports that Arthur is much busier than before, and so she sees less of him. Claims that she is now trying to 'get into regular ways of occupying' herself, and reports that she has her pupil for English twice a week, to whom she reads French. Remarks that all of her lady visitors 'rather shrink from discussing any of the many subjects which are interesting to intellectual people' and 'are content to express their fears as to where this "idolatry of intellect" will end.' Reports that she has heard from William, whose work, he claims, does not weigh on him. Remarks that Arthur 'looks quite strong'. States that no new master is yet appointed and Mr Phillips' brother is again at Rugby to help.

Assumes that Henry will be glad to hear of Mr H. Lee Warner's fellowship. Asks him to thank his Aunt Ellen for her letter, and to tell her how his mother should enjoy seeing all her 'north-country friends' again, but fears that it will not come to pass that year. Asks him also to send his love to his Aunt Henrietta, and thank her for her letter. Regrets that [William] Crofts cannot come back to the Schoolhouse for the quarter as the houses are very full. Tells him to tell Ellen also that she has 'a great dal to say to her about Welsh scenery', and that Ernest must go and sketch there some day.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that she has found 'abundant occupation' at Wellington College. Remarks on Minnie's activities there, and refers to the baby [Margaret] also, a description of whom William accuses Mary of failing to give. Claims that she and Martin get on well. Reports that Edward appeared very well, but that he had a few cases of serious illness in the Sanatorium. Reports that the 'house question is revived'. States that Ada had returned to Wellington College about a week before she [Mary] left, and claims that it was 'scarcely long enough for [her] to penetrate that [ ] of increased reserve....'

Reports that Eleanor [Benson?] and the [Osleys] are at Florence now, and have spent some time in Venice. Adds that Mr [Osley]'s little boy had a serious accident at Strasbourg, but it now recovering, and that they suffered from sore throats at Venice. Reports that Mr G. Woodhouse and Emmeline and their children are at Budleigh Salterton for the winter, refers to an offer of a house in Madeira made to Woodhouse by some friends of Lord Brownl[ ]. Reports that Henry's Uncle John [Crofts] has just taken his second son Ernest to a school in Germany for two or three years, and that Alfred Sidgwick 'just escaped being classed with the 25 "unplaced" boys in the Rugby scholarship examination....' Refers to her 'poor sister [Elizabeth] Lace', of whom they have not yet had 'any really improved account.'

Announces that she goes home on 27 November, and that on 28 November William brings Mr Conington and Mr Ellis to spend Sunday with them at Rugby. Remarks that James T[ ] appears to like Wellington College much. Reports the many of Edward's 'rather grand neighbours', such as Lord Calthorpe and Lord Gilbert Kennedy, invited him to dinner, and that he 'got some amusement from what he said and heard, and was all the better for it. Remarks that she found Wellington College decidedly healthy in the autumn time. [Incomplete]

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Resultados 1 a 30 de 54