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Russell, Conrad George Edward (1878–1947), farmer and letter-writer
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Letter from Venetia Stanley to [Edwin Montagu]

[The British Hospital, Wimereux.]—Has received his note, and commiserates with him on his attack of pleurisy. She dined last night with Conrad and Hunter, and is going for a walk with Conrad today. Violet has written to explain her objections to their marriage. Expects to be home on 10 or 12 July. Mikky is depressed.

Letter from Venetia Stanley to [Edwin Montagu]

[The British Hospital, Wimereux.]—Has received the books and his letter. She expects to leave on Saturday or Sunday and see the ‘old boy’ [Asquith] on Monday. Has fallen in love with a man named Capel, has seen Gilbert, and may lunch with Conrad tomorrow. When she returns she will tell him about something marvellous that happened to her yesterday. Two of the orderlies nearly drowned today while bathing.

Letter from Venetia Stanley to [Edwin Montagu]

[The British Hospital, Wimereux.]—Has received the books [on Judaism]. Outlines her plans for the next three weeks, including getting clothes for Russia and announcing their engagement. They had only a few new patients last night. She lunched with Conrad, and Gilbert may take her for lunch at the Cavalry Corps headquarters next week.

Letter from Venetia Stanley to [Edwin Montagu]

[The British Hospital, Wimereux.]—(5th.) Will return [to England] on Saturday. Freddie Guest came to see Norman, and took her to Boulogne for tea.—(6th.) Has received Montagu’s telegram, and has told Lady Norman of her intention to leave. Refers to Montagu’s possible journey to Russia. Is going to Hardelot with Conrad and Hunter this afternoon.

Letter from Venetia Stanley to [Edwin Montagu]

The British Hospital, Hotel Bellevue, Wimereux.—Has received his letter. Discusses the arrangements for her return to England, and her colleagues’ reactions to the news of her engagement. Discusses the date of the wedding and asks whether he has heard from her father. Has started reading Joseph’s book.

(Dated Tuesday.)

Letter from Venetia Montagu to Edwin Montagu

Pixton Park, Dulverton.—(8 Dec.) Her party [see A1/179] left London last night, after rushing from a matinee in which Diana was appearing. They slept at Taunton, and arrived at Dulverton to find Mary and Goonie there. The men have gone shooting.—(9 Dec.) They are all feeling ill, and have spent the time working and being read to. Duff and Michael have gone.

[24 Queen Anne’s Gate, S.W.] —(10 Dec.) Diana has the measles, as has Letty. Has been shopping for Christmas presents. Conrad, who called, is ‘utterly gloomy about the war’. Even the fall of Jerusalem is, she admits, little consolation, but she hopes Scatters will send a ‘souvenir’ from there. She dined with Hazel and John Lavery and Ivor Wimborne and they went to the cinema. The Roy made ‘ “hand” advances’ to Hazel in the motor there and back. Hazel claims that when she repulsed him on a similar occasion in Ireland he said, ‘Why do you come and stay here if you mean to do nothing?’, but it is doubtful whether this is true.—(11 Dec.) She went to a ‘ghastly’ lunch at Mrs Lionel Guest’s: ‘all Americans and consequently a noise that entirely bitched one’s powers of hearing or speaking’. She was planning to have only twelve to dinner tonight, but Patrick has asked her to have the ‘coons’ in as it is his last night, so an extra party will be coming.—(12 Dec., 3 a.m.) The evening was a nightmare. There was no piano for the ‘coons’, and everyone crowded into a little room, which became even more congested when others arrived. Eventually two bridge fours were arranged and the rest went to Goonie’s for stunts and dancing.—(Later.) Diana is very poorly. Has just dined at Mrs Keppel’s.—(13 Dec.) Has received his telegram. She dined at the Islingtons’.—(14 Dec.) This afternoon’s party for Indian officers at the Islingtons was a failure, as they chose unsuitable films for them. She dined with K and Frances, who were both off to Hackney after a night shift, then went to a party at Cardie’s flat. After stunts and dancing, they played chemin-de-fer. Duff lost £1600 and, to add to his miseries, has a poisoned finger.—(15 Dec.) Diana is rather better, but her Grace [the Duchess of Rutland] is pretty bad. This afternoon she went to a concert at the Albert Hall to commemorate the First Seven Divisions. After dinner at Ivor W.’s, she came home to find Nancy, Sydney, and Olga with Hugo disguised as a woman, and they spent a couple of hours dressing him in her own clothes.—(16 Dec.) She didn’t go the hospital, as the Duchess was worried she might be carrying measles. They spent the afternoon dressing Hugo up again, and took him to see Diana and Duff. In the evening she saw her mother and others.—(17 Dec.) Has received his letter. Insists that his mission is a success. Diana is much better. Has received a letter from Alan.—(Later.) Constance Rich[ardson], Eric, and Hugo lunched with her. Progress on his curtains is slow. Has received a note from Scatters.—(18 Dec.) Has bought most of the Christmas presents he asked for. When he returns they will have a long party at Breccles.

Letter from Venetia Stanley to Edwin Montagu

18 Mansfield Street, Portland Place, W.—Is busy celebrating Blanche’s engagement with her family; then she is going to Littlestone with Violet and the Prime Minister, and then staying with Conrad. Will invite Montagu to lunch if she does not go to Littlestone.

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Transcript

18 Mansfield Street, Portland Place, W.
Thursday

There is no vestige of floater {1}, but I’ve got my days terribly filled up. I’m just back from the Opera and am going to miss the 2nd Act and dine at home for a family beanfeast to celebrate Blanches engagement (Isnt it a joke!) {2} Tomorrow morning I am going to Littlestone with Violet and the P.M. in the motor, for one night, Saturday I go and stay with Conrad till Monday. Monday and Tuesday I have dreary things to do all day which brings us to Wednesday. If I dont go to Littlestone, which is quite possible, I will telephone to you and you might come to lunch if you liked.

This tiresome time table of my life shows you how stuffed up its getting.

I’m sorry I didnt get your letter in time to telephone to you.

Yrs
Venetia {3}

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{1} i.e. a faux pas on Montagu’s part.

{2} Blanche’s engagement to Eric Pearce-Serocold was announced in The Times on the 27th (p. 13).

{3} This appears to be the first time Venetia signed a letter to Montagu using only her Christian name.

Letter from Venetia Stanley to Edwin Montagu

Penrhôs, Holyhead.—Hopes he is having ‘more fun and less lumbago’ at Geneva. Refers to the guests at Penrhôs, and describes an expedition to the Skerries. Suggests organising ‘something delightful’ when they return to London. Violet has written from Naples; they [the yachting party] seem to be having fun. Asks whether he has been reflecting on the fate of the Liberal Party. Has seen Peel at a ball.

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Transcript

Penrhôs, Holyhead
May 29th 1912

My dear Mr Montagu

Thank you for your letter, I hope that since you wrote {1} you’ve been having more fun and less lumbago and that the Alpine Chough has proved worth travelling all the way to Geneva to see. We’ve had a very delicious time here, its been quite lovely, and Raymond has been at his very best. Unfortunately he and Katharine leave tomorrow to go to Sawley, and their places are inad-equately filled only by Hugh. Poor little Bongie owing to the strike has only had 2 days here and is now again in London, grinding out long telegrams to the P.M. He hopes to get back tomorrow. We made an expedition to the Skerries yesterday, so as to gratify Katharines curiosity as to the Nest of the Roseate Tern, but tho we saw quantities of ordinary terns, there was only one egg which we gound and not the vestige of a Roseate. They are too lovely, I think, and exactly what I imagine the Holy Ghost would look like. Raymond hustled us rather so we werent able to stay as long as we wanted. Next year if you arent again offended by the terms in which your invitation here is couched we will all go again, and you shall replace Raymond, as you would be a more appreciative tern watcher.

Conrad, alas, never came as he is ill again. This afternoon we’ve got an utterly bloody garden party which is blackening my whole outlook. We stay here till Tuesday {2} then London again. Dont arrange to go to your constituency over Sunday and {3} we’ll all do something delightful on Sunday. I daresay Violet will be back by then too. I’ve heard nothing from that party, except a post card yesterday from Naples from Violet but she doesnt mention whether she saw Le nôtre or not. They seem to be having great fun. Do you still envy them. I’ve been so happy here that I dont any longer.

Have you been considering the fate of the Liberal Party and have you arrived at any very black and morbid conclusions.

I saw your friend Mr Peel at a ball the other night and was nearly introduced to him, do you think I should have got on well with him. Bongie thinks I shouldnt.

This is quite the dullest letter I have ever written, but will you take into account that my brain is thoroughly befogged by sun and air.

Yrs
Venetia

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Written in pencil.

{1} This letter does not survive.

{2} 4 June.

{3} 9 June.

Letter from Venetia Stanley to Edwin Montagu

18 Mansfield Street, Portland Place, W.—Is sorry to have thrown him over. Suggests some other people he might invite. Will come and see him if her mother does not return.

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Transcript

18 Mansfield Street, Portland Place, W.

Why not ask Violet, or Mikky, or Bongie or Barbara McLaren or Conrad or Viola. I am so sorry if you were counting on me to have thrown you so completely and tardily over.

V

If you can get none of these brilliant suggestions and if Mother does not come back I shall of course love to come, but I feel I am an uncertain prop on which to lean. You can telephone about one o’clock if you want me and if you want me and if I can come of course I will.

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Written in pencil. This letter must have been written after Barbara McLaren’s marriage, which took place on 20 July 1911. The reference to Lady Sheffield’s absence suggests that it may have been written on the same day as MONT II A1/75.