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Sanger, Anna Dorothea (1865-1955) wife of Charles Percy Sanger
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Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Has just got Bessie's letter: as Mr Orchard says this is 'the best solution', and Julian agrees, it had 'better be done as soon as possible'. Has been 'rather poorly' but is now much better, and is hoping to go to Cambridge on 15 or 16 February. Mr McEvoy seems pretty well, but is going back to hospital next week. Bob's book ["Translations from Greek Poetry"] is out; he has sent copies to Dora Sanger, Mary Fletcher, and the Bluths. Hopes Bessie is getting better.

Postcard from Dora Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

Haies [?: postmarked Bristol]. - Interested to learn from Robert's 'delightful essay in Books that the Blatant Beast [allegory for calumny and slander in Spenser's "Faerie Queene"] is still at large'. She and Daphne [her daughter] are 'not among the "very few & very weary"' so had thought the Beast had suffered the same fate as the 'other powers of Evil'. Wishes she had seen the ponds when George took her to tea at Wallington once, but it 'would have been torture... not to bathe'. His point about the 'romance as well as the sensuous pleasure of bathing' is quite true; an essay could be written in itself on the 'various flavours' of bathing in different types of water. Postscript on address side of card notes that she lent out the first edition he sent her [of "Windfalls"?] and does not know to whom, so is very glad to get this one.

Letter from Daphne Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

24 Maid's Causeway, Cambridge. - Very kind of Bob to send her his poems ["From the Shiffolds"]; unsure which ones she liked best since 'being so various they are difficult to compare'. Also good to 'have a reminder of civilised life', which she gets 'very little' of here, though she does on Sundays at her Aunt Sophy's, whose friend Maud Allen sometimes reads poetry aloud. They tried to arrange a meeting with Bertrand Russell for her, but she could not make the day when he and his wife had lunch with them; hopes to see him sometime. Recently saw Bob's niece Mary for the first time since her wedding; liked her husband 'very much'. Hopes that all at the Shiffolds are keeping well; hears about them occasionally from her mother and others such as Alys Russell, whose letters are 'always full of news in brief of many people', which is good as 'most people seem to have pretty well given up writing letters nowadays". Her colleague has resigned so she is now the only billeting officer for this ward; can manage as 'so many evacuees have gone back'. Is getting a week's holiday at Christmas which she will spend with her mother.

Postcard from Dora Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

Postmarked Almondsbury, Bristol. - Has written 'many letters' to Bob in her imagination, but it is 'so much pleasanter to sit in the garden reading [his] poems' so sends instead a 'belated postcard'. Very kind of him to send her his books, and likes this volume ["Aftermath"] particularly. Is distressed about Bath [recently targeted in a 'Baedeker' raid]; lucky that little 'irreparable damage' to the architecture has been done. Wrote to Riette [Sturge Moore, working there in the mapmaking department of the Admiralty] but has not heard from her. Asks if Bob has any news of Gordon Luce, and whether Luce's children are in England.

Letter from Dora Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

Harts, Almondsbury, Bristol. - Thanks Bob for sending her his poem ["A Dream"]. Her sister read it twice before she had a chance to see it. Asks if Bob has copies for sale, as she would like a few to send to friends; thinks it 'one of the best things' he has written, on a level with his 'letter to Goldie [Lowes Dickinson]'. Asks what his other friends think of it. His 'powers do not decay', though he 'often scratch[es] his head' and says he does not know what to do. The reconciliation of Lucifer and Christ seems original and interesting; must read "Par[adise] Regained" again. Wishes she could see Bob and talk to him. Finds Lady Bessborough and her family letters 'fascinating', as is everything that 'gets near Byron'; the letters are 'newly published by Lord Bessborough' ["Lady Bessborough and Her Family Circle"], and inspired her to [re-?] read and enjoy Byron. Has also read a new biography of [Edward] Trelawny [by Margaret Armstrong?]. 'That lot and the Wordsworth-Coleridge group never grow stale'. Heard 'scraps of a talk on Hazlitt' by ? on her 'very bad wireless' recently; wishes more of such talks were broadcast.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

When in town last week, saw Roger [Fry], who advised him to see [Frederick] Porter; Porter seemed 'a very sensible sort of man', and he thinks Julian would like him. Porter thinks Julian should come and visit him at his house in Chiswick when the Cambridge term is over and show him some drawing; he is going to France for a fortnight in July and perhaps Julian could go with him. Likes what he has seen of Porter's painting; he teaches at the Central School of Art[s and Crafts]. Does not think he will come to Cambridge on 8 June, but Bessie probably will. Had quite a good [Lake] Hunt, but left on Monday. The Sangers are visiting.

Letter from Dora Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

31 Sydney Street, London, S.W.3. - Thanks Bessie for all her kindness this Christmas: it seemed silly to write from Lemons Hill Farm [near the Shiffolds, at Abinger]; meant to come over on the last day but 'Bertie developed glands - probably the same flu infection'. Christmas was 'delightful' and John keeps talking about the train, the big nursery, and the hundred bricks, which make a 'marvellous present'. Discusses his and Kate's weight and height. Sends love to the Trevelyans, including Julian, and hopes they will see them in Cornwall in the summer. Bertie and the children saw Dora Sanger today; she is 'better, but far from well'. 31 Sydney Street 'all but sold' on the Russells' terms, and Bertie has got 20 pounds on insurance for a coat which was stolen from the hall when they are away: they are 'doing a war dance, & would like to give the burglar a commission'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Glad that Julian is having a good time at Hamburg; envies him 'the chance of learning German properly' and seeing Wagner 'performed properly'. The Viennese opera company recently performed the "Ring" in London; the singing was very good, but the 'Covent Garden scenery and stage-resources' were 'miserable... it was a national disgrace'. Can send a German libretto with English translation for the "Ring" or "Tristan and Isolde" if Julian wants. Dorothy [Archibald?] 'has measles quite badly' but is now recovering. He and Elizabeth are going to Welcombe for a few days next week, then to Oxford to visit [Robert] Bridges 'the Poet Laureate, a few leaves from whose wreath I hope to steal'. The Sangers and Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] visited at Whitsun; Goldie may return when Dorothy is well. Saw George Moore in London this week, who recommended that Julian read Bertrand Russell's last book "An Outline of Philosophy"; thought he had it but can't find it, and is writing to ask if he has lent it to Goldie. Moore also thought that Julian might 'find some of the books dull reading them alone', but it would be much more interesting to go to lectures and discuss the ideas with others. The Welcombe Mabuse [Gossaert] was sold last week at Christies, and fetched more than any other picture except 'a fine early Rubens portrait'. Charles was there, and got a Canaletto of Venice for uncle George for Hallington. Asks to be remembered to Professor [Albrecht?] Mendelssohn [Bartholdy?], who visited some years ago; hopes he will visit again one day.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Reminds Julian to send a copy of the 'last "Ray" [school magazine?] to Auntie Mien [Röntgen]. Apologises for not writing about the Lake Hunt sooner, but has been very busy. The day before, uncle Charles drove him and Molly to visit Wordsworth's Dove Cottage at Grasmere; Charles had a bad knee, and 'could hardly walk, much less hunt'. He himself was a hare on the first day, and was 'not caught till 4.30'; the next day he chased the 'youngest and fastest hare, down a dreadful scree', then when searching for him in some rocks 'heard Molly shouting a long way off' and saw another hare in the valley being chased by uncle George, whom he cut off and enabled George to catch. Was 'so tired and stiff' next day that he accepted an offer to be driven to Leeds to catch an express train home. Saw the Sangers, who were visiting but have now left; Dorothy Archibald 'who used to be Mrs Reece' is staying. Matthews has taken away the wireless as it was not working, but says he can re-install it any time next week. Elizabeth and 'cousin Littie' are going to visit Julian and stay with the [Sturge] Moores; if he himself comes it will just be for the day. The cuckoos are still singing, but are 'usually out of tune'; the azaleas are at their best. C[lifford] A[llen]'s architect brother [Godfrey] has been to visit; thinks Julian would like him, so perhaps they will get him to visit again when Julian is here. He 'looks after St Paul's [Cathedral, London] and says they are probably going to do the wrong thing about it'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Has just returned from the Lake Hunt, 'stiff, but not crippled': describes some events of the three days of hunting, including being a hare on Sunday, when he 'enticed 3 hounds up Kirkfell (nearly 3000 feet)'; draws a map [on the last page] to illustrate his capture by hounds including Charles and young George. Was driven to catch his train by [Laurence John?] Cadbury 'who makes cocoa' in 'a care that looks as if it were made of silver'; the roads were 'full of Whitsuntide motors' but Cadbury 'drives very skilfully' and, passing the cars and charabancs where he could, sometimes went up to 80 miles an hour by the speedometer when the road was clear. Has almost recovered from the 'stiffness' caused by the Hunt. The Sangers and Dorothy Reece [later Dorothy Archibald] have been visiting; Mrs Sanger is still here, until Monday, when [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson is visiting. Elizabeth went up to London with Mr Sanger and Daphne to see Wagner's "Meistersinger", and returns tonight. The 'Exhibition has been demolished' after 'enormous' crowds in its last days, including 'the chairman of the I[ndependent] L[abour] P[arty: Clifford Allen], the ex-President of the Board of Works, the King, the Prince of Wales in Ivel cheese, and several distinguished literary personages.' Hopes Julian is enjoying bathing.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

13A Hanover Terrace Ladbroke Grove. - Is sceptical about the translation of his books into German. Sorry to hear that Trevelyan has had mumps; hopes he has now recovered. At heart is miserable about the state of Europe; distractions include dinner with Clive [Bell?] and [Ralph?] Hawtrey, and the new letters of Byron, which he discusses at length with comments on morality. Has also been reading the 'absurd' book ["Home Life with Herbert Spencer"]. Morgan [Forster] has returned, unhappy because he cannot write (with which Trevelyan will sympathise). Met Bertie [Russell] and his wife at the Sangers'; does not think he will like 'Mrs Bertie'. Mrs [Beatrice] Mayor's two plays ["The Girl and the City" and "Thirty Minutes in a Street"] were acted on Sunday; supposes they were not much of a success but he was interested by them, particularly that acted by her sister [Betty Potter]. Has had long walk with [Nathaniel] Wedd who is 'gallant' but not well; Dickinson sceptical about the psychoanalysis he is receiving. Sends best regards to Trevelyan and his hosts.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

The Cottage, Bosham. - Regrets that he cannot put up [John] Rodker, as Durbins is let until the end of September and he is 'more or less a wanderer'. Has had little success in thinking of other possible hosts: expects Lady Ottoline [Morrell] would not be possible and fears Rodker may have to go to London. Is sorry not to help as he liked Rodker when he met him at Dora Sanger's. Asks if Trevelyan will be in town the week after next. He and the children have had a good time at Bosham, sailing and spending time outdoors; they leave for Failand on Monday.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Robin Ghyll. Langdale, Ambleside. - Thanks Bessie for her letters; has wished she could see her. It is eight days since they lost him [Theodore]; it 'does somehow get better... chiefly by dint of that old steam-hammer of Dame Nature's, which goes on thump, thump, thumping the same knowledge into one's head & heart'; meanwhile 'his lovely little life is taking form & shining out more perfectly than ever', till she sometimes already feels it 'as a perfect whole, not as the piteous little broken bit it was... at first'; asks if that feeling grows, or if 'the pity of it gets ever stronger'; has often thought that Bessie, if anyone, must know [having lost her own son Paul].

Thanks Bessie for reminding her of 'that sweet little story'; remembers [her children's] 'outspoken surprise when they found [her] to be "the wrong Auntie Bessie"' very well. Dora Sanger is 'indeed a warm-hearted soul', and Eleanor Acland has written to say that 'all the Chelsea mothers & Chelsea Nannies look at each other through tears'. She and George will be at Stocks or the Cottage for at least two months, not London; thinks Bessie must 'come & make a pilgrimage among the family babies', since Molly's will also be at Watford.

Letter from Thomas Sturge Moore to R. C. Trevelyan

20 St James's Square, Holland Park, [London] W. - He and his wife heard the news [of Paul Trevelyan's death] from the Sangers the day evening before Bob's letter arrived, so were 'already full of sorrow and sympathy' for the Trevelyans. Too 'overwhelmed' by the thought of what losing their own children would mean to himself and Marie to offer more than 'a timid assurance of fellow-feeling', as far as is possible without 'the brutal experience'. They had hoped very much that Paul was getting strong again, so it is a real shock. Hopes that they will be able to 'bear up'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

1, Garden Court, Temple, E. C. - Originally enclosing [Warre?] Cornish's article; asks Bob to acknowledge receipt if he does not send it back at once; if Bob could give his opinion this might help them [the editors of the "Independent Review?"] to form their judgment. Sends love to Bessie. Postscript on back of the letter informs Bob that Crompton [Llewelyn Davies] has gone to France with [Bertrand] Russell; he seemed 'much better [emphasized] before he left' [referring to Crompton having recently lost his brother Theodore]. The Sangers are expecting the birth of a baby in around October.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Happy to go with Elizabeth to see the doctor; says she should make the appointment herself and gives Mrs Scharlieb's Harley Street address. Will be back in London on Monday. Glad Elizabeth is going; believes the doctor is 'very able in all such matters. A real pity the dress will not fit. Sir George is recovered from his [rheumatic] 'feverishness' now. Aunt Margaret [Holland] cannot have them on the 13th, and Sir George will not go in Ascot week, so thinks their visit will fall through; asks if they could still visit Elizabeth and Robert for a day as Sir George 'seems anxious for it'. Will 'ask the Sangers &c' but fears she is now 'getting too full'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Does not think Bob ought to wait longer than Wednesday night to come, even if the papers are not yet ready; will meet him at the station on Thursday morning and they can have a quiet day to themselves, their 'private marriage day'. On Friday morning she will be busy with people who are moving her belongings; they will have to go to the Town House [Stadhuis] that day to declare their intention to marry so that the 'publication' [ondertrouw] can take place on the next two Sundays. Has her last lesson [with Eldering] at Amsterdam on Saturday, and wants to go to the Röntgens for the last time with Bob and stay the night, if he does not mind staying in a hotel; on Sunday they must take the 'alto violin' to Mrs Asser, who has moved from Leiden to Haarlem, and can show them her Japanese prints on silk. Has been tearing up her old school exercise books, but has kept some. This afternoon, is going to say goodbye at the Children's Hospital where she used to teach. The Salomonsons are staying at the Hotel Cecil; Jeanne would be 'immensely pleased' if Bob could call on them briefly. Asks Bob to give [Charles Percy] Sanger her 'warmest congratulations'; he is a very good friend to follow Bob's example so soon [in getting engaged to Dora Pease].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Is glad that matters are resolving themselves, even if not in an ideal way; does not think her uncle 'had any right' to speak of them as he did, but since he has thereby found a way out of the difficulty, they must not mind, though it was he who caused the difficulty and did not write directly to Bob's father about his objections [to inviting the Howards to the wedding]. Thinks Bessie should not have written to his father instead of showing the letter to her family at once, but it was an understandable mistake. His mother was very sympathetic and wise about everything this morning. A shame Ambro [Hubrecht] altered the letter, but he might have been the one to 'bring him to reason'. He and his family do not want the religious marriage, neither does she, so there is no need for it; 'absurd' to suggest that Sir H[enry Howard] cares; his father will probably 'settle that difficulty in his letter'. There was a small delay with the legal papers, which are being sent today; would perhaps be best for him to stay in England until they are signed. Will probably go to Roundhurst with the Frys for a night on Friday. Must not take her uncle being hard on them too much to heart; he is wrong, so she can laugh at him privately; 'it is a great thing to laugh at people; it is much better than being bitter'. His father is very relieved and now wants to come to the wedding very much. Had a good time with MacCarthy and [Oswald?] Sickert, though he was anxious about Bessie. Is glad she likes the idea of going to Haslemere first. Thinks he told her that the [Apostles'] dinner is in London, not Cambridge, and they might stay the night there before going North. Berenson and some of his other friends have got together to buy the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry. He likes it very much 'as a work of art', as he likes almost all of her work; also as an instrument, though not as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch do. Will send her the list of contributors soon. The Holman Hunts have sent a 'charming piece of old Japanese print'. Will bring over his frock coat, new blue suit and new country suit; does not think he needs his London clothes, which are 'very old and shabby'. Needs a new topper [top hat]. Asks whether he should cross to Flushing or the Hoek.

Adds a postscript saying that he has been to a 'very amusing farce with [Henry Francis?] Previté', with 'lots of very good things in it about falling in love' which interested him more than would have been the case in 'the old days'. It was by [George] Bernard Shaw ["You Never Can Tell"?], whom Bessie may not have heard of. Will write tonight to Berenson and some of his 'clavichord friends'; his letter to the servants apparently pleased them very much. Sanger is 'at this moment writing to Dora on the same table'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is sure things will improve and she must not worry; as his mother says, 'it is really rather... a storm in a teacup'; it is nothing to compare to the happiness that will soon be theirs. Though he often fails 'through weakness and idleness', his life 'has been passionately devoted... to the best and most beautiful things which [his] imagination can attain to' and hers will be as well; lists all that will be good in their lives. Will write again to the consul [Henry Turing] if he does not hear from him today, since they need to know whether he can come on the 7th [June]; has also not heard from Sir Henry Howard, through whom he sent the letter; will send the second letter direct to Turing. There has been some delay at the lawyers about the settlements; has written to tell them to speed up. Bessie should tell him if he need do anything else regarding the marriage conditions her uncle sent. Thinks he may come over on 12 or 13 June. Meta Smith, his aunt Margaret's daughter, has sent a silver inkstand, and Mrs Holman Hunt a piece of Japanese silk. Had a good time at Cambridge: saw Mrs McTaggart, a 'nice quiet sort of person'; Tom Moore read his play and thinks it should come out well though he has pointed out 'some serious faults and suggested alterations'; Moore is going to give him a lot of his woodcuts, and has begun an Epithalamium for them, though since he has not got on with it says they should defer the wedding for a month. Asks what he should do about the Apostles' dinner; it will be 'quite exceptional this year', Harcourt is president and everyone will come; would very much like to go but will not break their honeymoon if she does not wish it. Very keen to go to the lakes eventually, but they could spend a few days before the dinner at Blackdown among his 'old haunts'; Mrs Enticknap's aunt lives in a farmhouse a mile from Roundhurst, which would be perfect. Hopes [Alice and Herbert] Jones' visit has been a success. [Desmond] MacCarthy is coming tomorrow for a few days and [Oswald?] Sickert on Sunday for the day. Will see [the Frys] this evening and discuss colours for the walls. Thinks [Charles] Sanger is very happy; is not entirely sure [about the marriage], since 'Dora has behaved so strangely', but everything seems to be coming right. Has ben reading Emerson on poetry and imagination and thinks it 'amazingly fine and right'. Most people think "Pères et enfants [Fathers and Sons]" is Turgenev's best book; he himself does not like the ending but finds the book charming; has heard the French translation, the only one he has read, is better than the German or English one - Sickert says so and he is half-German. Has ordered the trousers, and found the catalogue so will order the beds and so on next week. Glad Bessie got on with her socialist sister [Theodora]. has just had a note from Sir Henry Howard saying 7 June will suit Turing; she should let her uncle know. Does not think there will be further delay with the legal papers.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - It is very good of her to see the matter [his father's wish that Sir Henry Howard and his wife be invited to the wedding] the way she does; not possible for 'these sort of things' to be ideal; does not think the Howards will really spoil much, and hopes the Grandmonts will not be 'unreasonable' and come too. Had to tell his father of the Grandmonts' objections or he would been angry when he called on Sir Henry at the Hague and found he had not been invited. His father does not know Sir Henry well, but his aunt [Alice] Dugdale does, and in general his family 'are on very good terms with the Howards of Corby, though not very closely related'. His relations would very likely be offended if Sir Henry were not invited; does not particularly care about Aunt Alice, but his father does, and he does care for his Aunt Margaret and does not know how she would react. Sanger is engaged, and therefore quite recovered. True that she [Dora Pease] 'behaved so badly to him' and there is a doubt whether she is really in love with him, but Bob is optimistic; [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson knows more and is reassuring; Bob has not yet seen Roger. Expects Sanger's wedding will be in July or August; wonders whether Bessie will like Dora, as people often do not and she has plenty of faults; yet she is not heartless. Splendid that Sanger is 'so miraculously cured'. Thinks he will go to Dorking on Thursday; MacCarthy and Sickert are coming to visit. Will write more later of what he did in Cambridge. Curious about Lily H[odgkin]; did know she was there [Dresden] and had just written to thank her for returning a book he lent her two years ago. Is glad to have her new photos, though does not think them very good.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Discusses post times. The weather has been 'absolutely beastly' and he has a cold, which gave him a nose-bleed this morning. Took a day off yesterday and lunched with the Frys; [Roger] Fry is very busy, having had to give an extra lecture last week, so Bob conveys his advice on house decoration. Need good painters, as [George?] Moore had trouble when he was having his Cambridge rooms done, due to the 'stupidity of the workmen'. Gives his aunt Meg Price's address. Thinks he is becoming 'more romantic' about her; wishes he had been with her to 'caress... and explain away [his] last cruel letter' in which he thoughtlessly exaggerated his 'regret at [his] fading days of singleness' [9/119]. She will certainly not come between him and his friends, as she has 'quite enough of their own intellectual qualities to be their friend in the same way' he is. Has usually gone abroad alone and not allowed his 'sensations to be interfered with by those of others'; will probably enjoy going to Greece more with her than with 'people like Daniel and Mayor'. Attempts to explain his feelings in detail. Will be able to talk freely to his friends after his marriage, though 'it is true that men do talk more obscenely, and more blasphemously, than they ever quite dare to talk before women' and he thinks that this difference is right. Should not have written 'so carelessly' and caused her pain. Has written to her uncle saying he and she should fix the date. Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies came for tea last Sunday; he is probably going to the Lizard at Easter; he said his brother [Arthur?] and his wife went to Land's End for his honeymoon which was 'very satisfactory', but that Savernake near Salisbury plain was the 'best place conceivable', with 'every kind of scenery' only an hour from London. He says it has a good inn; Bob may look on his way to Cornwall. Seatoller [in Borrowdale] is very nice too, but much further away. Has not yet heard from Daniel how Sanger is; will tell Bessie [about Sanger's unhappy love affair] when he sees her; she guessed correctly that the woman was Dora. He and Fry still think it would have been best for them to marry, but that now seems unlikely; her treatment of him is 'not through heartlessness exactly... but owing to circumstances, and also to her rather unusual temperament'. Has done some work, and has been re-reading Flaubert's letters; feels more in sympathy with him than any other modern writer. His mother says Charles and George are thinking of giving Bessie a 'very pretty sort of box to keep music in'; wishes they would give them the flying trunk or carpet Bessie mentioned. They will have to content themselves with meeting in dreams, though it seems [Empedocle] Gaglio has a dream-carpet which will take him into Bessie's brain; still, he does not have a lock of her hair so Bob has a start.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague'; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thinks Bob's arrangements about the piano 'quite perfect & quite the nicest we could have' and trusts the 'professional friend' to choose the upright one. Would like to write and thank Bob's aunt [Margaret Price] for her present, so asks for her address. Thanks Bob for sending the table measurements, as well as the lock of his hair, which she will keep in his "Pilgrim's Progress". Describes a dream she had about him, and another about Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio - probably as Bramine [Hubrecht] had mentioned him in a letter. Sorry that Sanger is still unwell and the likely cause [love]; he is 'the last person who ought to be treated like that'; asks if 'the lady in question is Miss D. P. [Dorothea Pease]'. Confesses his jokes about regretting not being able to go to Greece with his friends any more made her cry; she has often been anxious that he will lose a great deal of freedom when he marries; surely he will be able to talk as freely with his friends after they marry; she would like to go to Greece with him. Glad Bargman gave good advice [about the house]; hopes 'dear little Gussie [Enticknap]' will not make too much noise. Her uncle's lawyer has not yet heard from the 'Paris oracle Mr Barclay' about the marriage. The Grandmonts likely to be there; so now thinks they should fix the wedding for Whit week and will write to Bob's mother if her agrees; asks if he has a preference about the day; suggests not Wednesday as then 'all the servants are married together & there usually is a great rush'. Interrupted by a visit from her friend Anna de Ravity [?], with whom she had a good talk; Anna 'talked most sensibly about the [Second Boer] war' and is 'disgusted' by the general wild anti-British sentiment here. Is going to see her sister Marie in Rotterdam tomorrow. Tells Bob not to leave his books and manuscripts around, or 'the wood nymphs' might steal them; would write a poem on the subject if she could; wishes they lived in the time of the "Arabian Nights" so she could use a magic carpet or flying trunk to come to see him.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Tells her about a discussion with Bargman, the man who did the house for him, about damp, the possibility of putting in a baize door as Gussie [Enticknap] can be 'a little obstreperous' after tea; and burglars. Thinks perhaps he should have the library, as first decided. [His aunt Meg Price] says she will pay the extra when they want a grand piano if she is still alive, which is 'very generous'; he has suggested she gets them a Broadwood £40 upright, but her 'professional friend' will know best what will suit a small room. They must go and visit as soon as they can; she rather reproached Bob for not visiting. Gives the measurements for the table. Sends her a curl from his head; is wearing hers next to his heart. Thinks he will send "The [Lady's] Bat" and "Dryope", and perhaps some others, to the "Speaker"; Hammond, an editor he knows, thinks they may put them in. Can break off his tenancy of the Temple rooms whenever he likes, but should like to keep them for the summer; Sanger will probably find another tenant in the summer, though he may still marry, which Bob and Fry think would probably be best although his friend [Dora Pease] has treated him badly. Sanger is in financial difficulty, which Bob does not want to worsen. Thinks he will probably go to the Lizard for a few days at Easter. Has not yet written to the Borrowdale people [the Peppers] about the honeymoon, nor to her uncle, which he should do this evening. Does not anticipate that there will be any difficulties regarding the wedding, but he should check; will leave the precise date of the ceremony for her and her relations to choose. Asks if she has heard from the Grandmonts. Had a scare yesterday when his Shakespeare, two Greek books, and the manuscript of his play, which he had hidden in the woods then 'wandered off meditating' were taken home by a passing labourer; was in despair but the gamekeeper suggested where they might be. The [Second Boer] war is 'getting to a very unpleasant state': the 'war party are very brutal, breaking up meetings, rioting etc'. Thinks the Government has behaved 'shockingly' for not suppressing them, there has been much indignation against them which may do good in the end.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Hopes to decide today whether the second post reaches its destination at the same time as the first. Had a busy time in London, spending much time with Sanger before he left for Greece, as well as dining out, going to Fry's lecture, and to see "Richard II" with [Thomas Sturge?] Moore and Binyon. Returned on Wednesday and has done some work; saw Fry and they discussed Sanger's illness; he is 'desparately in love with someone who is behaving very cruelly to him [Dora Pease]' and he does not know what she feels for him. Will tell Bessie more when he sees her. Certainly good for him to go to Greece with Dickinson, Daniel, Wedd and Mayor. Saw them off at the station and 'felt desperately incline to go off with them'; they were so cheerful, even Sanger, and he has always dreamed of going to Greece, which they know so well; regrets that after his marriage he will not be able to go with them 'with who one can talk as freely as one chooses, as blasphemously, as obscenely, as wittily, as learnedly, as jovially as any of the old Greeks themselves did'. Feels he should have 'made hay more assiduously' during his bachelor days, instead of living 'mewed up' alone in the countryside. Knows Bessie will compensate him for all he is to lose; she must come to Greece before long or she will find him 'running off' without her. Praises "Richard II"; it was well acted, though he thought the Richard [Frank Benson?] "vulgar". Has written to his Aunt Meg [Price]; she seems happy to get them a 'cottage piano' which will later be exchanged; asks if Bessie wants the final choice of the instrument or whether she trusts his aunt's 'professional friend' to do this. Sophie is 'Miss Wickstead [sic: see 9/117]], not some young lady friend' he has not told her about.

Typewritten accounts, and references to accounts, of HS by various friends, acquaintances, pupils, colleagues and admirers.

Includes Professor Maitland's speech at the memorial meeting for Henry Sidgwick; obituary by Miss E.E.C. Jones, which appeared in the Journal of Education for October 1900; 'Dr Keynes in the Economic Journal of Dec 1900', references to Sidgwick made by Professor Sorley, quoted from a letter of 2 September 1900, and from the International Journal of Ethics for January 1901; reference to Sidgwick made by Alice Gardner in a letter of 24 August 1900; 'Mr C.F.G. Masterman in the Commonwealth for November 1900'; 'From the Cambridge Letter of 1900 of the Newnham College Club'; 'A.T. Lyttelton [Bishop of Southampton] in a letter of Sept. 21, 1900'; 'Sir F. Pollock in a letter of Aug.30.1900'; 'Mrs Sanger [A.D. Pease] in a letter of Sept.23.1900'; 'Mr C. Cooper who took his degree in 1874 in a letter to Dr Ward' from October 1900; 'Professor Mandello, Professor of Law and Political Science at Pressbourg in a letter of Oct. 14, 1900'; 'Miss Agnes Mason in a letter of Nov 16. 1900'; 'Mrs McLeod [E. Stevenson] in a letter of Oct.24.1900'; 'Miss A.M. Jackson in a letter of June 9.1900'; 'Miss Alice Woods in a letter of Sept.2 1900'; 'Miss Amy Sharpe in a letter of Sept.3.1900'; 'Miss Emma Brooke in a letter of Sept.29.1900'; 'Miss Susan Cunnington in a letter of March 9.1902'. Some MS explanatory notes, amendments and emendations included.