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Additional Manuscripts c Benson, Mary (1841-1918) wife of Edward White Benson
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Letter from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick.

Returns the obituary of Henry Sidgwick [included: 106/1B], which he describes as 'a very extraordinary production, and yet touching.' Supposes that 'her feeling pressed for utterance and she [Meta Benfey] thought it was so long ago that it did not matter'. Has translated the exordium and sent it to Minnie; thinks that he had said to Nora the previous night that he would send the translation of the Benfey article to her, but failed to send it, and so sent it to Minnie. With envelope addressed to Nora Sidgwick, postmarked 28 Nov 1906

Sidgwick, Arthur (1840–1920), educationist and classical scholar

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

Informs her that they have posts there [in Keswick] occasionally, if she wishes to write. Writes a list of 'pros and cons' in relation to their accommodation. Concludes that on the whole 'it is the best situation in Borrowdale: and therefore in the English Lakes: and therefore, for short mountain walks, in the World'. Admits to not liking the scenery as much as he did three years previously, and thinks that neither does William, but concedes that the scenery is beautiful.

Reports that they have met Edmund Fisher and his wife, 'who is nice and prettyish'. Announces that he reviewed a poem called Ludibria Lunae in the Spectator. It is a satire on the efforts to emancipate women from their subjection, and he claims to have tried to be as stinging as he could, without showing that he had lost his temper. Announces that they expect [G. O.] Trevelyan soon, and that he is to be married on 24 September. Reports that William 'does not seem unwell particularly', but his sleeping has not improved as much as they had hoped. Sends his love to Edward and the children. Asks if she heard that F[rederic] Fisher was engaged to his Bishop's daughter [Agnes, daughter of the Bishop of London, John Jackson].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson.

Announces that he is going to Cambridge 'on the 3rd', and is thinking of going to visit her for a night or two 'after the 11th and before the 18th if convenient.' Remarks that the Rugby news was a shock, and states that he ceases to advise acquiescence [a reference to the troubles with the head, Henry Hayman?]. Reports that Arthur was skating on the Downs.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Reports that Mr [G. G.?] Bradley told him that he forwarded Henry's watch to him at Wellington College, and suggests that she [Minnie] has pawned it. Asks her to send it to him at Trinity College, where is going on the following Saturday, if it is 'hanging about [Wellington] College anywhere'. States that he arrived at Rugby by Calais. Claims to like the house at Rugby very much. States that the dining-room can only hold twelve people, but that the drawing room 'is very nice.' Reports that there are 'an extraordinary number of new masters' there, with the result that 'the time-honoured arrangements are undergoing much criticism.' Hopes that Ada [Benson] got safely to Weston that day 'without having another attack.' Does not think that their mother looked very well. Claims that Mr Ladkin 'behaved like a Beast.' Reports that they have just been consulting Mr [Charles?] Waterfield as to the advisability of going to [Law] with him. States that he bought a print of his favourite Correggio 'with the jolly little cherub astride the cloud.' Asks whether Edward has filled up the vacancies satisfactorily, and sends his love to him.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to inform her that he shall come on the following Wednesday. Reports that he shall be staying with Mrs Clough from Monday to Wednesday if his cold does not get worse. Claims that he accepted her invitation gladly, as there is a new edition of Clough's Remains passing through the press, and he would like to talk to her about it. Intends to speak to his mother about Mr Horton and other matters on Wednesday evening, 'before Edward and Mary come'.

Asks if she has heard from William, and states that he has not found time to write to him yet. Asks her opinion on Noel's poems. Refers to the review of them in the Athenaeum, and states that Noel has told him that the two great critics of the age, M. Arnold and S[aint] Beuve, 'have both expressed themselves pleased by the book.' Reports that he has 'got rid of' his last pupil and is writing a paper for his philological journal. Reports that Patterson's book on Hungary is very nearly finished, and that he has seen most of it, and thinks that it will be both worth reading and readable.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Informs her that if she thinks it worthwhile to take lodgings beforehand, he thinks that Ambleside 'will be as good a place as any other.' Also mentions Grasmere as a possibility for the first week, and then on to Borrowdale. Announces that he shall be ready to go 'about the 6th or 7th', and hopes that she will have seen William before this; did not think William seemed ill, but 'he is certainly somewhat nervous, languid and irresolute...' Believes, however, that he appeared to like the idea of going to the Lakes. States that he enjoyed his visit 'L.W.C.' [to Wellington College] very much; Mary seemed very well, and that the children were delightful. Reports that he had 'some intimate talk with Edward on religious subjects, which was thoroughly pleasant and satisfactory' to him.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Reports on how his days are spent. Mentions William's visit to his family home. Is glad to hear his mother's good account of Minnie. Reports that he had a letter from Edward [Benson] some days previously; believes him not to be 'the right man in the right place', and thinks of him as 'thrown away' in his role as headmaster. In relation to a proposed stay at Sydenham declares himself to be 'tolerably indifferent', and states that he only wants to be able to see her and have the opportunity of quiet study. Thinks however that it might be a bore 'going and settling down for a short time [especially Xmas time] in a place' where they know nobody and have no introductions. Asks if her idea includes Edward and Minnie. Gives his own ideas in relation to how the time should be spent; 'paying visits vaguely and spending the rest of the time at Cambridge', and a week or so at Rugby. His idea, however, does not include William. Admits that he would enjoy being near London. Reports that Arthur is very well 'under his gymnastics' Announces that he is going on Tuesday to stay a night with a friend 'who has been among the D[ ] and [ ]'. Informs her that there is a little book about the latter by Lord Carnarvon. Asks if she has seen Dr [Joseph?] Wolff's life.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that he is going to Paris for the Easter vacation. Remarks that he has not received any letters from her, and presumes that she is busy 'on domestic cases'. Reports that he has not heard anything about Wellington College for a while, and asks how many boys there are there. Mentions that he saw a paragraph in the Times 'about chapel', and hopes that they have not all caught cold in going in and out. Asks after Martin, and wonders if he would remember Henry if he saw him. Reports that Arthur is leaving them now for the continent; thinks that he is wise in going abroad instead of going home before the Tripos list is out, 'because at home he would brood over it so much more.' Claims that he will be surprised if Arthur 'is anywhere else than 2d.'

Asks if she has played any more chess, and states that he has had a game or two since he came up to Cambridge, but finds that it has always interfered with his work. In relation to his Arabic, claims that 'it has languished rather of late', and believes that the only place where he can work well at a subject of that kind is a place like Dresden, where he can isolate himself completely. Nevertheless, he hopes to be pretty well advanced both in Arabic and in Hebrew by the end of the Long Vacation. Remarks that he has heard that 'there are ten volumes of Les Miserables', but that he has hitherto been able to read only the fourth. Believes that there are two volumes of Kinglake's history of the Crimea, but that he read the first three weeks previously, and has got no further.

Is going down to Rugby for a day or two at the end of the week; undertakes to avoid politics, and to discuss only 'the more interesting subject of Matrimony.' Reports that lately he has been reading ' "Ladies' advice to each other" in several little books, and flatter[s himself] that he knows a thing or two of [her] sex'. Claims that he did so because he hates 'being taunted as a Fellow of a College with ignorance of the female character'. Sends his love to Edward, and remarks that he has not heard 'that he is found out yet.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he intends to come to visit her 'from the 4th to the 11th'. Reports that he is up in Trinity College, working, and that he feels very well after a pleasant visit to Oxford. Reports that William seemed in very good spirits, and that he was sleeping 'very fairly' and hunts every other day. Desires to hear the Rugby news, and asks who are the five old Rugbeians. Reports that he wrote a letter to the Times, but that it was not published. Reports that he received a letter from his nephew Martin, which was 'very nicely written and with that curious mixture of childish and prematurely adult phraseology that one sees in a precocious child'. Asks her to tell him when Mary is going to visit her, and supposes that Edward will be very busy all the vacation.

Asks his mother's opinion on 'the new Tennyson'. States that they [in Trinity College] regard it 'as rather an imposition on the part of the publisher - republishing the Morte d'Arthur...and having so few lines in a page.' Complains that it is as bad as one of Victor Hugo's novels. Refers to a reading of the poem called The Higher Pantheism by Tennyson himself at a meeting of the Metaphysical Society, and to Tyndall's reaction to it. Remarks on 'how busy Death has been' during the previous six months among those whom he knows. Reports that he has just heard of the death of one of the Clifton Masters called Cay.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he finished his Marlborough examination on the previous Tuesday, and intends to cross the channel on Monday evening. Intends to stay one month in Paris with Graham Dakyns, and then shall probably spend a fortnight walking in Switzerland 'or somewhere', after which he shall 'probably settle down for a month in Germany', and return about mid-September. Supposes that by that time she will be well settled in Rugby. Regrets not having seen her at Wellington College, where he had a most pleasant visit. Was pleased to find both Mary and Edward so well. Comments on the ugliness of the new baby [Arthur Benson]; needs to do this to keep his 'character as a baby-hater', since he is 'compelled to join in the general Martin-worship'. Claims to have enjoyed his examinations on the whole, and to have been freer from hayfever than usual. Refers to the fact that 'poor Dale had lost two of his boys from Diptheria', and comments that it is supposed to be an unhealthy season at Dresden. Hopes to go there in the summer. Praises Marlborough, and reports that the boys 'are very nice and their relations with the masters more what one w[oul]d desire than at any other school with which [he is] acquainted.' States that he was very much interested in the Isle of Man, and was surprised to learn that his uncle Lace was a benefactor to King William's College there. Sends his love to his aunt.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Refers to their lack of correspondence, to Edward, and to 'the latest news from Wellington College'. Announces that he is going to see their mother the following day, and plans to go to Paris at some point. States that if he goes, it will probably be with Graham Dakyns, 'who is desirous of learning French in order to qualify himself for a Government Clerkship.' Claims that the only real method of combining amusement with instruction 'is by learning a foreign language on it's [sic] proper soil.' States that he remembers firmly resolving to write to her on the twentieth of the previous month 'to condole with [her] on coming of age. Relates a humorous incident that occurred to him that day involving his addressing himself to the wrong man in Macmillans [bookshop?] Tells her to write to her in Leamington, and mentions the kinds of things he likes to read about in letters. Reports that he has not been doing anything literary that term, and has been 'lazily absorbing philosophy, history and politics.' Claims that he is 'engaged on a Great Work', but explains that he has invented this explanation as a reply to those who ask him what he is doing. [Incomplete].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Explains that he did not hear of the birth of Mary's baby [E.F./Fred Benson] until some days after the event. Sends his love to her. Does not expect that [J.W.?] Hales will have time to see him. Reports that he has had Arthur to breakfast that morning. Relates that he seems 'lively enough', that he is staying with Symonds, but not in his house, and that he goes to the Lakes on Thursday morning.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he intends to come to see her on Tuesday, and that he will be staying with C[harles] Bernard at Hampstead. Refers to the possibility of his mother going abroad, and hopes that she will avail of the opportunity. Thanks her for her offer of hospitality to Bernard and undertakes to bring her his answer. Declares that Mary has not written, but he 'take[s] the will for the deeds.' States that the present age 'is too busy a one for epistolary communion...' Declares that this is his last examination.

Letter from F.W. Temple to Edward White Benson.

Announces that Henry Sidgwick comes [to Rugby] as the new Master. Hopes that Benson and his wife [Sidgwick's sister] will be glad. Sends his and Sidgwick's love to her. Tells Benson to give his boy 'a toss'.

Temple, Frederick (1821-1902) Archbishop of Canterbury

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Suggests that he had better pay the visit to which he looks forward, having ascertained from [Henry Weston] Eve 'that Edward had attained the desire of his laziness, and extolled Easter Holidays from an unwilling Committee...' Asks whether she intends to go to Rugby for the vacation. Informs her that the only time he can go to them is 'the Monday week after Easter to stay till the Saturday: or two or three days at the beginning of Passion week...' Explains that he has asked a friend [G. O. Trevelyan] to stay with them at Rugby for the week after Easter, and that he intends to go down to examine at Harrow at the end of March. Refers to a poem entitled 'Wander, o wander', which he wrote for her, and which now appears in 'McMillan's magazine'. Reports that he told their mother, and that she wrote him 'a reproachful criticism for being so unfeeling towards the young lady!' Asks if she has seen [Nathaniel] Hawthorne's [The] Scarlet Letter, which he judges to be 'a wonderful work'. Reports that he is just getting to the end of his hard work, as the Littlego begins the following Monday. Refers to an enclosed poem of [E.E.] Bowen's, [not included], about the Rifle-Corps. Tells her to show it to Donne, if he has not seen it.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Liverpool]:- Hopes that Arthur 'settled about the bill all right.' Writes to inform her of his travel plans. Goes to the Isle of Man that day to examine there for a week, and in about a fortnight intends to go to Marlborough for another examination. In the meantime intends to call at Wellington College. Asks if they [Edward and Minnie Benson] can take him in, and if not he will go on to Eton after seeing her. When he shall come depends on his hayfever. Anxious to hear about her plans for the summer. Announces that he is going abroad after the Marlborough exam and will come home earlier than he otherwise would if she has a house. Reports that he has not heard from Rugby in a long time. Is not looking forward to a long sea voyage. Wishes now that he hadn't taken the examination. Refers to the Cambridge prizes and to the fact that Arthur won the prize for the composition of a Greek ode. Claims to be very glad that James Rhoades got the English verse, and believes that the disappointment 'will do Myers a great deal of good.' Asks her to tell Minnie that he got the papers all right. Hopes they are all well. Has ordered 'parcels and things' to be sent to Wellington College. Reports that he has been researching the Isle of Man. Asks her when she is going to see the Exhibition, which 'is only like a big shop-window', and claims that the day he spent there with Graham Dakyns he was more bored than he has been for a long time. Asks her to write to him in the Isle of Man.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to ask her to inform William of certain developments; that 'W.A. Wright [new member of the Ad Eundem] cannot come'; that he himself will come if his hayfever is not too bad; and that he has not yet heard from the other new member. States that he is glad to hear that he [William?] is going on so well. Expresses his regret at the news of 'the calamity', involving Dr Meyer. States that he has never met the latter, but that he has heard a good deal from Mary about a Miss Meyer. Reports that [in Cambridge] they are all 'quiet and prosperous', and that he is 'rather hard at work with a variety of teachings.' Asks whether she has got any subscriptions for him for the ladies' lectures. Reports that he has read the greater part of Disraeli's novel [Lothair?], and does not think it equal to the best of his earlier ones, but states that 'it is very light and amusing reading.' Does not think that he has read anything else lately except Rossetti's poems, some of which he judges to be 'splendid', but he would not recommend the whole book.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that she is glad to hear that he is taking it easy 'in those few lovely days' which they had the previous week. Hopes that he [and Nora] can find something that she may give them as a wedding present, and asks if they want a dinner service or a D[ ] service, or if they would prefer something in silver. Asks if he received the watch and chain. Assures him that she 'heard not a word about any single person being "bored" on the 4th' [the Sidgwicks' wedding day], and that everyone seemed to be enjoying themselves. Reports that F. W. H. Myers wrote to her saying that he enjoyed the wedding very much, and also sent her his verses. Adds that the party with her, including Uncle William and Aunt Steph[anie? ] 'seemed very happy'. Declares Nora's dress and veil to be 'befitting an angel.' Promises to do her best to obtain a cook, and undertakes to make an impression of the Great Seal and to send it that night to [A. J.] Balfour. Asks whether his wife is to be known as 'Eleanor' or 'Nora'. States that she received a card from Minnie that morning, and that the latter is anxious to hear from Henry. Adds that she also saw A. Clark, who thinks she is better, and spoke highly of Henry.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that were it not for the fact that he is to go to her in October, she would be very sorry to say that she cannot receive him that month. Reports that she was at Stone G[appe] a week previously, and was going again to the Chancery, when she heard from William of their sudden move to Guernsey, so she hastened home. States that the 'whole party' seemed in good spirits, and hopes to hear the following day of their arrival in Guernsey. Refers to Henry's attitude towards the move, and to William's return to Oxford, which had proved to be a disappointment. Announces that she is going to see Minnie the following Monday, and will see Martin and Arthur before they go to school. Declares that the loss of 'the Crescent Villa family' is great, and hopes that the move may bring some greater good to William. Asks Henry to write to tell her when he is going to visit in October. Adds that William was anxious to know from Henry the day of the Ad Eundem, and whether he [Henry] could go to Oxford. Suggests that she could ask Mr and Mrs Trevelyan. Offers him lodgings on 20 September in Oxford, if he has 'any difficulty about a bed' and doesn't mind the distance from Lincoln College, and states that Mary could make him very comfortable there.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at the receipt of his book the previously night. Claims that she will not understand its subject, but that if she could send it forth to the world 'with a mother's loving dedication, it would be that all the philosophical world would be the better for reading it.' Hopes that 'they' have written to him from Rugby to tell him that they are meeting on 4 January, and informs him that 'A[rthur] S[idgwick] and Charlotte have their visit at N[ ] and the Chancery first, and don't get home again until Sat: 2[nd] Jan[uary].' States that William's work was to end the previous day, but that he has had a bad cold, and Isabel and his [son] have also been ill. Invites him to go to Oxford, and suggests that they all go to Rugby together. Mentions Henry's friends, and declares that she doesn't know what the Greens' plans are. Reports that she has seen a good deal of them, and that 'they are most kind.' Reports that Mrs Symonds was with them a short time ago, and 'just as [she] was going to have a nice [ ] [ ] with her, a telegram came to say that one of her children was in scarlet fever and she must go home.' Adds that it turned out that the fever 'was of a mild kind'. Presumes that he is 'still engaged with work for the Ladies', and insists that he take a holiday. Reports that Arthur Benson has had a rheumatic attack 'just as he was going in for the Term's Examination at Eton - and so missed it - which grieves him.' States that he was expected at home on Thursday or Friday, and that Martin comes home from Winchester the following Wednesday. Adds that Minnie and Edward are both well, but that the family could not join the 'Rugby party'.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Minnie kept her well-informed about Henry when at Lincoln, and that his own letter told her more. Refers to his activities with regard to his lectures and book. Asks him to go to Rugby around Christmas, 'when A[rthur] S[idgwick] wishes to assemble [them] for his house warming.' Adds that Minnie and Edward cannot go because their boys will just have arrived home from school. Expresses a strong wish that he should come to Oxford. Adds that Mr Green has been asking her when Henry is coming. Reports that William and Isabel are recovering from colds. Asks if he had told her that Captain and Mrs Go[ ] lived at Cambridge, and asks him to send her the address of Mrs Go[ ]'s sister Be[ ]. Informs him that his godson Willy [Longsden] 'has been doing better lately + is promoted to a "Top hat" ' at Merchant Taylors' school.

Reports that the Committee of the Association for the Education of Women at Manchester have asked Miss Cannan to be Secretary 'for that [work] where she lives - [ ] Prestwick.' Suggests that Miss Clough might like to be informed of this. Claims that she is 'still in rather a mess with carpenter + masons + painters to follow.' Adds that she has two comfortable beds to offer to friends, and tells him to bear it in mind if he wishes to go to Oxford. States that William and Isabel would be pleased to see him [and Nora] and that Mr Green and his wife always have a welcome for him. Reports tha the Symondses have come home from Switzerland. Reports that Edward Sidgwick wrote to her to tell her another daughter of his was born some weeks previously. States that he was much interested in what Henry had to say about spriritualism, and that their friends the Cooksons told them that Henry was at the Lakes and talking on the subject.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at receiving word from Henry, and at knowing that he is not ill. Explains that she came to Budleigh Salterton to be with Miss Temple 'who has been poorly for many weeks'. The latter was disappointed that she could not go to Rugby for the Speech Day with her brother and nieces. Reports that William wrote to say that he was glad she was coming and thought 'that it was imprudent not to compress the business of moving into as short a space of time as possible'. States that she reached Exeter on 27 June with Katie and Agnes Temple, and came to Budleigh Salterton having spent two nights at the Palace, to which she returns on Saturday. Hopes to be at Rugby again the following week. Describes the scenery and the beneficial effects of the sea air.

Reports that she left Arthur and Charlotte well, and that Mr Whitel[ ]d 'is so poorly in a sort of low fever, as to be quite unequal to his work'. Adds that Mr J. Wilson's brother Charles 'is come to do what he can to help'. Reports that Mr Phillpotts has been away 'owing to the illnes of his eldest boy who is away from Rugby', suffering from some kind of fever also. States that Miss Temple read her 'part of a letter to the Bishop [her brother Frederick] from a clergyman of the name of Hawkins', who asked the Bishop's opinion on the subject of spiritualism, and promising to send him some 'Photographs of "Incarnate Spirits"' Adds that she has not seen the Bishop since, but hopes to ask him about the matter when she returns to Exeter. States that she talked to Mr George Woodhouse on the subject, and expresses her own interest in it.

Reports that Isabel's brother Reginald Thompson 'is lately married to a Miss de Morgan a daughter of the Mrs de Morgan who is a great spiritualist. Refers to Professor Clifton, who told Isabel and her 'some wonderful stories told him by the elder [Mr] de Morgan now dead.'

Relates that Minnie has been suffering from toothache, and that Edward is in full residence, and that they will not move away from Lincoln until the end of September or beginning of October. Adds that their boys, Martin and Arthur, are going for scholarship at Winchester and Eton respectively, about 21 July. Remarks that she thinks that 'C[harlotte] S[ophia] S[idgwick] is a great favourite with all who know her', and doesn't believe that Arthur 'will find any great defects of which he was not aware - such as want of higher culture etc.' Adds that she has 'a sweet gentle temper', which is 'very winning.' Is anxious to hear from Henry, and is glad that he wrote to Mrs [ ]well, from whom she has not heard since.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Remarks on the length of time it has been since they have been in contact 'except casually'. Claims that he has been waiting anxiously for the other Initial paper.' Urges her not to be lazy, and to write [it], and assures her that she will be glad of it afterwards. Mentions that he heard from their mother about the problems with the drainage, and hopes that 'the Prince is all right now: and that Edward has "repaired the semestrial losses". ' Refers to the fact that he has been offered a mastership at Rugby, and had at first accepted it. Announces that he has now refused it. Admits that he has behaved very badly, but claims that it has cost him much mental struggle to break his word. Thought it better 'not to prolong the error of a day into the mistake of a life.' States that he is going abroad to shake the whole thing off his mind.

Lists some of the reasons why he had accepted the offer in the first place, including the fact that their mother wanting to go there, his wish to live with her and his liking for Rugby, his having such an admiration for Dr Temple, his liking [A.G.] Butler so much, and explains that they all made him neglect the fact that he knows that his vocation in life 'to be not teaching, but study.' States that Edward will understand better than she, and asks her to show him the letter. States that he wishes him to know the truth of the matter, since he will probably hear of it from elsewhere.

Tells her not to send the next paper to him, but to Miss [Annette?] Kitchener in Newmarket, and that if she has anything to say to him, to address any correspondence to Post Restante Paris. Supposes that she has heard from their mother since he left her. States that she 'was quite well then at the Raikes, but she is now at Leeds.' Admits that part of the regret he feels in relation to his conduct is due to the predicted reaction of his mother to it.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to the note that she wrote to him at the end of William's letter, and explains that she did not write since for fear of a letter not reaching him in Lucerne. Relates that she has been staying at Stone Gappe since, and has enjoyed her visit, despite the monotony of life and lack of amusement, and that 'all are so kind'. Describes the mountain air as refreshing, and claims that 'it seems to revive old feelings, and to bring vividly before one the days when life had never been a burden....' Claims to be grateful for the long holiday, but that much work remains to be done.

Fears that she has mislaid Henry's Exhibition Certificate, and undertakes to look for it when she goes home. States that her return home is delayed somewhat owing to her being unable to arrange her visits as she had wished. Believes that she will find solitude 'less irksome' than Henry imagines. Announces that she will go to Wellington College some time after her return home. Remarks that it seems a long time since she saw Minnie. Adds that she does not want either Minnie or Edward to feel that she 'should ever be the least restraint upon dear M.' States that she leaves Stone Gappe that day for Biddlesdon, where she shall be for about a fortnight, after which she intends to go to Leeds for ten days, and then home. Asks Henry to send her 'a Telegraphic message' if he is elected 'on the 29th', and wishes him success.

Remarks on Minnie going to Marlborough with Edward, who is to preach there, and on Mr Bradley having to entertain his company, 'Mrs. B. being upstairs!!' Reports that Arthur is at Wellington College, and will go to Marlborough with them. Adds that all send their love to Henry, and that Elizabeth [Cooper] is still there, but goes home on Monday.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at the news, which she heard from Henry's aunt Stephana, that he had been elected as a Fellow of Trinity, and appointed Assistant Tutor. Adds that she heard that his examination papers were the best, and states how proud of him she is. Declares that she is thankful also that Arthur enters on his new life with Henry by his side, and is glad of the good example he has set him.

States that she is on her way home, and shall be there on 22 or 24 October, and then goes to Wellington College. Thinks that Minnie would like to see her, and presumes that all Edward's friends will have had time to pay their visits. States that she hears on all sides of their happiness, and wants to see it for herself. Reports that Henry's aunt Henrietta is there [in Leeds], but that she goes to Bedford the following day to see his uncle and aunt [William and Stephana Crofts], and then proceeds to Brighton.

Encourages to bring any friend of him home for Christmas. Hopes that he will stay 'all the time at Rugby' as she will be very glad for all the family to be together once more. Reports that '[p]oor little Ellen' is very poorly with a fever. Asks him to give her love to Arthur and to tell him to write to her in Leeds until the end of the following week. Adds that Willy Croft's report for the [Doctor] is excellent. Asks to be remembered to all his friends, and that her congratulations be passed on to Mr Somerset. Does not think she knows Bowen. Wishes she had seen Father's name [on the list of elected fellows], and sends her particular remembrances to him and his brother.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Apologises for having neglected to write to him. Declares that her time at Wellington College has passed pleasantly, but has been devoid of incident. Refers to Minnie's happiness with Edward, and to her domestic activities. Remarks that Edward, although not ill now, needs rest. Looks forward to 'the happy Rugby Xmas', and declares that she is glad she kept on the house there. Is very glad that Henry will be at home all the vacation, and hopes that he will ask [A. J.] Patterson to come. Explains that during the latter half of the vacation Edward and Minnie and William will be gone, and suggests that he invites his friends then. States that she will ask William about his friends when she passes through Oxford the following Thursday, when she is to meet Lucy Brown and lunch with her in William's rooms.

Reports that Mr [Francis?] Martin has just been [at Wellington College], and told her that Henry is looking 'remarkably well'. Adds that she thinks that Henry should be doing lighter work. Tells him not to let Arthur work too hard. Reports that William was at Wellington College that previous Sunday, looking very well. Refers to 'the appointment [of H. M Butler as new headmaster] to Harrow', and remarks that '26 sounds very young', but that she hears that Butler 'is a very fit man.' Is glad to hear that Henry comes home on 15 [December]. Asks him to give the enclosed [not included] to Arthur.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Is very glad that Henry [and Arthur] are coming home [to Rugby] the following week 'to warm this cold empty house.' Reports that she is well, but that she hears that Minnie has a cold. Refers to imminent weddings: Mr Smythies. and Miss I. Anstey; Miss Atty and an Indian gentleman [i.e a British army officer who has served in India]; Miss [Sale] and 'a Mr. Smith'; and Miss Wratislaw. Urges to bring some copies of the photograph he mentioned, as she wants them for her self, and also for their 'old servant Hannah', who she hopes will come for Christmas. Asks if there is a photograph of Isaac [Barns]. Is pleased to hear of Arthur. Asks if he got Margaret's wedding cards from [Riddlesdon], and states that she 'really became "Mrs Cooper" on that day'. Saw Miss Attersoll at Wellington College; refers to her views on young headmasters. Adds that she hears that Mr Butler's appointment [as headmaster of Harrow] is very satisfactory. Refers to A. J. Patterson's impending visit. Asks Henry to thank Arthur for his letter, and to tell him 'to fix about his visit to Lee Warner' when he comes to Rugby. Also asks him to bring Arthur's certificate for the exhibition home.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Announces that she is back in Wellington College, having left William at Chester on his way to the Raikes [Robert Hodgson Sidgwick's house at Skipton]. States that he goes to Oxford, and then abroad, his final destination being Florence. Refers to the enclosed [letter; not included]. Reports that after leaving Beddgelert they went to Carnarvon, then to Bangor, and on to Llandudno. Adds that at Llandudno they met a group of relations - her brothers William and John, with their respective families, 'the M[ ]s - B[ ] - and Miss M[ ] and Miss [Wraith].' Reports that Minnie is very well. Announces that the [Grand] Speech day is on the following Tuesday. Remarks that Edward needs rest and a holiday. Adds that Elizabeth is there also. Also refers to Rugby. Asks him to tell her about spirit-rapping. Reports that she heard good news from Arthur, and that he is enjoying his sojourn immensely. Includes his address in Ambleside. States that '[t]hey are all charmed with Mr. Lightfoot', and describes his and Arthur's activities throughout the day. Asks Henry to tell her how he likes Berlin, and adds that there were no letters from Mrs [Susanna?] Arnold.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Minnie gave birth to 'a very nice plump little boy' that morning', and is well. States that Edward was away for the birth. Adds that Elizabeth claims that the baby is like William. Refers to Henry's letter, and states that they are all astonished at his 'cheap board and lodging with instruction', but expresses concern about 'those dreadful scourges' which afflict him by night. Is grateful for his description of 'the strange ceremony at Aix.' Hopes that he will find a companion to travel with. Announces that Edward 'is emancipated now and in a few days, all being well with Minnie and his babe'. Adds that he intends to go to Marlborough for a few days and the following week to join the party at Nab Cottage for a week. States that Mr Lightfoot has induced him to do so, and she is sure that it will do him good. Complains that the weather is very gloomy. Reports that Edward was not very well when his boys went away, and she does not think he has fully recovered yet. Remarks on Minnie's selflessness with regard to Edward. Reports that she has heard from William, and is now writing to him at Innsbruck, where she supposes he and Mr [Francis?] Otter will be in a week's time. Adds that he wrote from Munich, and had seen Henry's friends Cowell and Browning on their way to him. Sends Edward's and Minnie's love to him.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Explains that he must stay up at the end of term for an examination that begins on 16 December; wishes he had declined, but does not like to refuse requests from his College. He had intended to come to her on 24 December, but states that he shall certainly come while Mary is there. Is sorry to hear about William. Says that he sent him an invitation to come to Cambridge, but that he did not answer it. Apologises for having forgotten her birthday. In relation to the [Franco-German] war, does not believe that there will be an invasion of England just yet. Refers to the enclosed [not included], which will show her that they are alive. Reports that the Hitchin girls have come over to pass the Little-go examinations. Explains that they are not formally admitted, 'but the university has given leave to them to have the papers, and the examiners have consented to examine them.' Fears that if they pass, 'the Cambridge world will not be particularly impressed.' Declares Miss Garrett''s triumph in London to be 'remarkable', and certainly unexpected by her committee. States that he does not like the expense of the school-board elections, and remarks that he and others 'are supposed to have managed everything with as little paid service as possible, and yet [they]....have spent nearly £500.' Adds that he finds now that he can come on 20 or 21 December.

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