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Trevelyan, Janet Penrose (1879-1956), author
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Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan and R. C. Trevelyan

Cadenabbia. - Got engaged this morning to Janet Ward. Everyone 'who is most nearly concerned is very pleased', and when they meet her Elizabeth and Robert will be no exception. The wedding will not be until next spring, and the news will be a secret for a month or so; they can, however, ask his parents and Charles more about it and about Janet since he himself must be away for the next three weeks. His housemates Hilton Young and Robin Mayor also know about it, as do 'dear Theo [Llewelyn Davies] and Booa [Mary Prestwich]'. He and Janet are very much in love.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Zermatt. - Thanks Elizabeth for her note and telegram; Caroline had written to 'the poor lady'. Glad the concert went well, and hopes next week will be good; Dolmetsch must appreciate Elizabeth playing. Zermatt suits Sir George very well and he is taking 'quite long walks'; they are staying an extra day, going to Martigny on Wednesday, then driving over the Tête Noire to Chamonix. They will spend three days there before travelling home, arriving in London on 25 June. Sir George is going up to Wallington; Caroline asks if she could visit Elizabeth and Robert on the way to Welcombe, bringing Pantlin, who could stay in the village. Glad Elizabeth is comfortable at Gr[osvenor] C[rescent]; hears Mrs Cooper [the cook] is back so hopes Elizabeth will take all her meals at home; she should also use the carriage, as Mary and Janet do. There are quite a few people here, but it must be 'horrible' in season.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - He and Bessie send many thanks to his father for the 'duck and hare': they did not realise until they received his mother's letter [11/109] that he had shot the hare himself. They had it for dinner yesterday: George and Janet were visiting, and have just left, both seemed 'very well and cheerful'. George 'seems relieved to get the history [his England under the Stuarts] off his mind'; has been reading the chapter on Queen Anne and it 'seems very good', though George is dissatisfied and thinks it 'too sketchy'. He can always 'treat the subject more elaborately someday' if he wishes. Thinks the book should be successful.

Last time they were at the [new] house, ten days ago, the roof was being finished, almost a fortnight earlier than expected. They have been making arrangements for some of the work on the garden to be done this winter: a 'trained lady-gardener... is to be responsible for the work'. The house looks good and has been 'well built'; since no alterations to the plans have been needed so far, there ought not to be any extra expense.

The 'Sunday Tramps, led by George' came for tea yesterday: 'young [Thoby] Stephen, and J. Pollock, and [George?] Barger, a Dutchman, and [Sydney] Waterlow, and R. Mayor'. All but Mayor are tall, and in their 'rather low rooms they seemed to Bessie like giants; they have never had 'so many and tall people' in the house together. Encloses two Chinese poems; the 'longer one, by a kind of Chinese Horace' was suggested to Robert by his father shooting ducks, but he sees from 'Professor Giles' translations' that it is actually geese; the rest of that poem 'scarcely applies' to his father, but the shorter, 'on Retirement', may. Understands that the translations are 'fairly literal, though the metres of the originals are quite different'. He and Bessie both send love, and Bessie thanks Caroline for her letter. Robert's book [The Birth of Parsival] has already been printed, though probably will not come out till February.

Separate sheet on which two poems [from Giles' Chinese Poetry in English Verse] are copied out: Discontent by Han Yü [title not copied out] and In Retirement by Li Chia-yu.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will write to Jan Hubrecht at once and invite him; sorry M. [Ambrosius?] and Mad. H[ubrecht] are staying for such a short time. Has had interesting letters from Robert about the Chantrey Com[mission]n, [Roger] Fry and so on; he will be glad when Elizabeth comes. C[harles] and M[ary] hope to get into their new house on 8 August; G[eorge] and J[anet] are going to see Aunt Annie [Philips] tomorrow. If Elizabeth thinks Mary can play well enough to accompany her, they can 'make her practice'; it is very kind of Elizabeth to say she will play at a party. Caroline has to organise the Tenant's party. Asks if Elizabeth's subscription to the G[rosvenor] Cr[escent] Club is due; Caroline will give her the money when they meet; believes the Club has changed management.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Good to hear that Julian is settled in his own nursery again; sure he remembers it 'as he notices so much'. Very glad that nurse [Mrs Catt] is really better, and hopes all will go well now. She and Sir George are settling down at Welcombe; they are alone till George and Janet come on Wednesday. Sir George says Elizabeth 'must not mind about paying'. Sends love to Bob, and says she 'will read the Medici letters [edited by Janet Ross] with much interest'. She and Sir George did not like the Post impressionists [the exhibition organised by Roger Fry at the Grafton Galleries] which 'leave the impression of a bad, & rather nasty dream, though [she] can see how clever some of it is'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Begins the letter 'Dear as a daughter', which she says was used by 'an old Medici lady' in the book Robert has lent her ["Lives of the early Medici as told in their correspondence", by Janet Ross], which she finds interesting but has not yet finished. Annie [Philips] is here and seems well. Is more or less recovered from her 'little feverish attack'. Glad to have good news of Julian. Asks if Elizabeth can send back 'the Shetland scarf' if she is not using it, as it 'does not look as "invalidy" as a shawl'; glad she is better. The 'A.S's' [Arthur and Charlotte Sidgwick], Janet and George 'amalgamated well'. Asks if Elizabeth's maids have recovered, and hopes the nurse [Mrs Catt] is sleeping better. Miss Richardson is here and is going with TitBits [the horse] 'to see sights accompanied by Annie's maid'. Sir George was very pleased to get Robert's letter; he has had a correspondence 'with "the master" [of Trinity, Cambridge, Montagu Butler?] on classical things'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Ravello. - Thanks his mother for her 'kind letter' about his book [The Birth of Parsival]; discusses the book and the legend of the Grail more generally. Does not intend to continue the story of Parsival at present, if he did would follow the legend more closely, but 'have a different ending, an anti-Grail one'.

They have had 'pretty bad weather again here'; will probably leave next week, perhaps on Tuesday with the Booths; will stop at the Berensons' for a few days on the way back. He and Bessie are well, though 'tired of the bad weather. Charles Booth is much better', though still not allowed to walk much. Sees from the paper that his father 'was [at?] the Irish debate', and from the Italian paper today that it had a 'good division - 42'.

They were 'delighted to hear from George [about the birth of his and Janet's daughter Mary] and also most pleased by the names chosen'; hopes Janet and baby are still doing well. Sends love to his father.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Intended to send a small book of his "Translations from Leopardi", but then decided to wait until Julian and Ursula next come here, as they 'might easily lose it moving about'. Pity they cannot come now, when the flowers in the woods are at their best. All quite well here; the [Sturge] Moores will return in a month. Originally enclosing, on Bessie's request, a photograph of 'the street in Forest Green that [Julian] used to admire'. The Bluths and Tet Htoot were here at Easter, but otherwise they 'seem to see nobody'. Hopes that Tet Htoot will bring two Chinese friends to visit. A 'bad London raid last night'; hopes he and the Bluths are all right; Irene [Cooper Willis?] has fortunately been away. Has very few friends in London now besides these, Logan [Pearsall Smith] and Alys [Russell]. Virginia [Woolf]'s death 'a great blow'; she 'felt she was going out of her mind again and could not face it'. Is re-reading "To the Lighthouse", his favourite of her books; is writing something on her for the "Abinger Chronicle", but it is 'impossible to say anything adequate in the way of criticism'. Forgets whether Julian knew her. Is continuing to translate Montaigne and getting 'a little bored with it'; 'much more fun writing poetry, even if it is not worth much'. Hopes Julian has managed to see Ursula at Taunton, and that she is well again. Has heard from G.M.T. [his brother George] that Charles is giving Wallington to the National Trust now instead of leaving it in his will; he will continue to live there, and one of the family (probably his son George Lowthian) will stay there after his death; this will save on death-duties so there will be much more money for the children. Supposes this should not be discussed until it is announced. Hopes Bessie will go with Miss Simpkins for a few days to George and Janet next month; otherwise she never 'goes away from here, which is not good for her'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry the 'pretty girl' [Hylkia Halbertsma, see 46/100] cannot stay with Elizabeth; wonders if she will have more success elsewhere; wonders whether, when Robert is settled with Madame Palumbo, Elizabeth could visit the Grandmonts at Taormina. Wishes she could have heard the concert [organised by Dolmetsch, see 46/100]; asks whether it was an artistic and financial success. Asks how she got on with the Arnolds; he [Ernest Penrose Arnold] 'had his faults' but both Robert and George owe much to him and his school [Wixenford]. The Arthur Severns have been visiting; she was Ruskin's niece [actually second cousin], and they live at Brantwood. Sir Courtenay Ilbert has also been; his daughters [Olive and Jessie] stayed with C[harles] and M[ary], as did F[rancis Dyke-] Acland and H[ilton] Young. George and Janet return to London on Monday; they want Robert and Elizabeth to dine with them and Caroline on 19 October, with a 'little party afterwards'; they could go to the theatre the night before. Amused by the idea of Elizabeth teaching a class; they are lucky to get her. Hopes [Helen] Fry is recovering; 'wretched for her' to be away from home as well.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The Shiffolds, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking. - The Interludes [in Prose and Verse, by G O Trevelyan] arrived this morning, and they look forward to reading it; Bessie will write soon to his father to thank him for it. Robert has 'just read most of Horace [at the University of Athens], which seems just as good as it ever was', and he expects the whole work will be improved by 'the slight alterations and 'the unimaginable touch of Time" [a quote from Wordworth's Mutability]'.

They have had a 'pleasant visit at the [Augustus Moore?] Daniels, and found all well at home'. George Moore has been for a short visit; now [Donald] Tovey is here for a week and there is 'an immense deal of music'. Bessie likes Tovey's playing as much if not more as anyone's, and he is 'very interesting when he talks about music, in a way few musicians are'; he plays 'a great deal of Bach' on the Trevelyan's clavichord, and their piano 'has a beautiful tone'.

Aunt Meg [Price] will visit in October and they hope also [her son] Phil. The Grandmonts are coming for a few nights next Monday. Does not know whether they will like returning to Taormina 'while the earthquakes still continue'; supposes 'Taormina is untouched, as it usually escapes', but Messina suffered greatly. Hopes there will not be a bad earthquake near Vesuvius, which 'is in great activity just now'; everyone near Naples seems 'very much frightened'. Will not be sorry if 'Cook's railway gets demolished', as long as nothing worse happens.

Hopes his parents are well, as well as the 'Cambo household [Charles and Molly]'; G[eorge], J[anet] and M[ary] C[aroline] seemed well when they dined with them in London; Crompton [Llewelyn Davies] was there 'and seemed fairly cheerful, though looking rather tired and worn perhaps [after the death of his brother Theodore in July].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear Julian is crawling now; will send a parcel for his birthday soon. Unlucky that Miss [Margaret?] V[aughan] Williams has caught measles; it can be bad in adults. Miss Martin came to Welcombe yesterday; they expect the Runcimans, Janet, and George on Saturday; think Charlie is also coming since he stayed at home with a cold last week. Thinks Elizabeth will like Mrs Walter Rea; glad she has 'such nice neighbours'. She and Sir George move to London on 22 Feb; she will go to the concert on the way from the station, and asks whether Elizabeth will be there. Asks how she liked 'the Spaniard' [Benvingut Socias i Mercadé, see 46/174]. Nice that Julian listens to music.

Card from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S. W. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; glad she likes Theodore [as a name for his son]; Jan is 'doing extremely well now'. Is sure that Miss [Ivy] Pretious 'could not get away', but Miss [Mary] Sheepshanks might; gives her address. Miss Sheepshanks 'certainly answers to [Bessie's] description' and is a 'very interesting person with many fine qualities both of mind & character'.

Card from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Board of Education embossed card [possibly from Charles Trevelyan, appointed as parliamentary under-secretary]; dated 'Monday. - Molly has been telling them how much better Paul was yesterday; he is very glad to hear it. Read the last half of [Robert's] "Sisyphus" again, aloud to Jan and it read 'capitally'; they both like it all very much. Is giving it to many of his 'literary friends' and hears nothing but praise; he finds some of the metres are too difficult, which is his only complaint.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

The Shiffolds, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking. - Has received his father's letter [12/89] and is sorry to have annoyed him by not writing more often; this is 'not through indifference', and he hopes in future to write more regularly. He and Bessie go abroad next Tuesday, and hope to reach Aulla [home of Aubrey and Lina Waterfield] on Thursday; hopes by then Campbell-Bannerman will have formed his cabinet. The Times's 'assertion about Sir Edward Grey' yesterday caused great alarm, but so far it seems unfounded. If they had indeed failed to agree, someone would be much to blame, but Robert thought George was being 'unduly pessimistic'; he thought if there had been a split nobody but 'strong radicals would vote against Protection' and the election would be a 'fiasco' for the Liberals. Robert doubts that 'principles are not just now more important than men in most minds'. Quotes [from Julius Caesar Act 4, Scene 3, 2115-2132], with Grey in Cassius' place, Campbell-Bannerman playing Brutus, and the Times the Poet.

He and Bessie are both well, though have had bad colds. Has sent the first act of their translation of Vondel's Lucifer to the Independent [Review]; George and Dickinson 'seem to like it' so he hopes they might print it; there is more of the translation, but the first act stands well alone. George, Janet, and Mary seem well. Sends love to his mother.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Rome. - Hopes Trevelyan has received his previous letter saying that everything is all right about the Deuchars; he just needs to know whether they should be met in Florence by Nicky [Mariano] or whether he should meet them later in Rome. Will be in Venice from Sept 5-7 for the PEN Congress. Is very sorry about Trevelyan's sister-in-law [Janet: news of her chronic illness]; appreciated her 'kindness and good natured intelligence'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Has not yet transferred the second fifty pounds to Bob's account since the lawyers have not yet 'transferred the personalty' [personal property of Florence Cacciola Trevelyan, which has come to George and Bob on the death of her husband Salvatore Trevelyan]. Mary is going to the Netherlands again in the first week of October, to work. He and Janet are going to Cambridge on Monday to look for a house; he will take up 'residence and full work there [as Regius Professor of History] in January'. Their mother was taken 'seriously ill' a few days ago; she has a nurse, but the doctor thinks she is over the immediate danger. George thinks it 'unlikely she will live more than another year' and that she will get to Welcombe again, though the plan was for her and Sir George to go in about three weeks. Their father 'seems fairly well, though on a permanently lower level than last year'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S. W. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; they were 'much amused and pleased at Goldie [Lowes Dickinson]'s horror of the man of war', but Bessie never 'saw Goldie dressed up in his war paint' as George did when they were 'volunteers together'. Afraid he and Janet cannot lunch on Wednesday 20th, and he is lecturing at Cambridge on Thursday 21st. Invites her to come to tea with them on Wednesday, or to dinner just with Jan on Thursday. Asks to be remembered to Jan [Hubrecht], and sends good wishes to his wife.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Metelliano. - Is happy to say that he is coming to England for the Executive Committee of the International PEN, taking place between 25-27 April. Is also planning to visit Roger Hinks in Holland. Must see Trevelyan, either in London or at the Shiffolds; is glad he is recovering, did not know he had been low. Saw a notice in the "Times" about [Reginald Popham] Nicholson's death, which must have affected B.B. [Berenson]. Will visit I Tatti just before coming to England. Has seen Raymond Mortimer, but missed [Stephen] Spender and Humphrey Sumner who were in Rome while he was in Paris with the W.F.U.N.A. Is very sorry about Trevelyan's sister in law [Janet: her illness]; would like to write to Trevelyan's brother [George]. Is almost sure to go to Edinburgh for the PEN Congress at the end of August.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

Robin Ghyll, Langdale, Ambleside. - As he and Janet have 'hoped and expected' for a while, Mary has got engaged to John Moorman, who came to Hallington for a week in August; they met in June, at the Cornfords' musical parties in Cambridge. He left Cambridge this year, having stayed after his degree to train as a clergyman, and is now a curate in Leeds; he studied under [George Gordon] Coulton, who 'thinks highly of him'. He is 'liberal-minded', and George has discussed religion and history with him 'with much agreement and no feeling of barrier'. Moorman is also a 'fine walker' and is 'small but wiry'; his father was Professor of English at Leeds, and his mother is 'much respected in academic circles', and matron of a University hall in Leeds; their closest family friend is [Arthur] Grant, recently retired from the History Professorship there, a 'first-rate man'. Moorman's 'most intimate older and younger friends are Bishop Wyld [sic: Herbert Wild, Bishop of Newcastle], who conducted George and Bob's parents' funerals, and his son [John?]; in fact his 'whole entourage and atmosphere is about equally academic and clerical'. Thinks he will suit Mary very well, though 'not many people would', so he and Janet are much pleased.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth is settled at Ravello and having a good Christmas day; expects it will be quiet, as theirs is. Had their 'very mild festivity' last night; George is staying, and C[harles], M[ary], and Mr Fitch came to dinner. They had music after dinner - Mary has greatly improved Charlie's singing - then 'played a letter game'. Most of their packing is done, and they leave [for Welcombe] on Tuesday; George will travel some of the way with them as he is joining Janet at Stocks for a week. The fogs in London, Manchester, Leeds and so on 'quite terrible last week'; hopes they will have gone. Asks if she may use one of Elizabeth's 'supernumeray [sic] silver inkstands' at Welcombe, as she is having a small room set up to use in the morning. George is well; he and Sir George discuss 'their respective works & the treatment of History &c &c &c at length & very amusingly'. Does not think George's book ["England Under the Stuarts"] has 'had a brilliant success', but it has been well reviewed. Asks to be remembered to Madame Palumbo; supposes Mrs Reid is still alive. Has received a postcard of Vesuvius from Heathcote Long so supposes he is somewhere near Naples. Asks if 'the diplomat' is any relation of Elizabeth's.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes that the snow in Italy has melted. Spent one night and '2 busy days' in London; Sir George went up for the day yesterday. Spent that evening with Janet, since George was at a 'review meeting' [for the "Independent Review"?], who is very well and 'enjoys the situation to the full'; approves of her preparations [for the forthcoming birth]. Thinks Charles and Mary are staying at Cambo till the end of the month. Mary has 'thoroughly got up the subject of Taxation of Land Values' and has given several short speeches on it; she has also written a leaflet which Caroline hopes to get printed for the W.L.F. [Women's Liberal Federation]. Good that she can help Charles politically. Wants Elizabeth's advice about pianos: there ought to be one at Welcombe, and she would 'like to change the monster in London!'. Has a room at Welcombe to write in now, so Elizabeth can now have the drawing room to herself to practice in. Expects Meg Booth will arrive [in Italy] soon. Asks if Elizabeth is thinking of going to Taormina this year; hopes the Grandmonts are well. "The Times" is 'so hard up for an argument for the sugar tax that they say it is unhealthy and that people should not eat so much'. A party of neighbours came for lunch recently, and more will come. Has had a 'nice letter' from Mrs Enticknap.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Likes to think of Elizabeth in Ravello. Has been very busy since coming to Welcombe on 3 January; has been arranging a room for her own use in the mornings, which is 'quite comfortable' though has 'no view' and, currently, a 'hideous paper'. The Arthur Sidgwicks and their daughter [Ethel] came on Monday, Sidney Lee joined them. On Wednesday the library opened; has sent Elizabeth a Stratford paper with a report. The ceremony was 'nicely arranged' and went well; likes the building, which is in keeping with the surroundings. [Andrew] Carnegie gave the building and fittings, which are 'in good taste', then maintenance of the building will come from rates, and there is a subscription fund for buying books. Hopes it will 'do good': there is 'room for "sweetness & light" in Stratford'. Miss Corelli did not appear but 'must be very angry'; is sure she will 'do something malicious'. Mary Booth says in a letter that Charles will probably bring Meg to Elizabeth; gave a 'cheerful' account of the family. Is going to London on Monday, and will spend the evening with Janet. Pleased to hear Mrs Enticknap has had a little girl [named May]; has sent her a coat and hood. Has never read [Stendhal's] "Le Rouge et le Noir", but knows "La Chartreuse [de Parme]". Has Madame [Juliette] Adam's memoirs, and has been 'delighting in Burne-Jones life [by his wife]'. Hope Robert's work is going well; asks whether they are continuing their translation; whether the road is mended yet, and whether the Capucini Hotel at Amalfi goes on 'as before'. They are taking a trip to Rome next winter. Sir George is well; he took a week's break from his book, 'travelling & doing his speech', and now happily at work on it again. C[harles] and M[ary] are at Cambo; they celebrated their wedding anniversary by catching the train to Woodburn and walking back by Sweethope Lake, and enjoyed this 'immense expedition' very much.

Postcard from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Rapallo. - He and Janet are very glad to hear that Julian has put on eight ounces. They are having good weather and walks here by themselves, before 'going on south to join the Hammonds' [John and Barbara]. Thanks Bessie for sending 'Madame Scocco's letter' [sic: Irene Zocco]; fears he will not be able to go to Palermo again; would have called on her last month if he had known she was there.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Bessie for her letter, and for enclosing Madame [Irene] Zocco's; very glad to hear 'how well and splendid Julian is ', which makes up for their sadness about the nurse's illness. Glad Julian has curls; Humphry is also 'very curly' but this is 'more out of the family line' for them. He and Mary 'play Lake Regillus and Horatius on the Museum floor' with some soldiers and some 'ancient Romans' he once got in Switzerland; she is 'very clever and sharp at the uptake'. Meanwhile Theo usually rides the rocking horse, though he looks on a little, 'and spouts the poems' [by Macaulay]. He is 'very much interested' ('much' is an insertion as 'concession to Jan's hereditary ideas of grammar') about [Donald] Tovey; takes it that his progress [on the opera "The Bride of Dionysus", to Robert's libretto] is 'slow but sure'. Must be very interesting to watch him at work. Can easily believe what she says about Forster's book ["Howard's End"], which would make it 'like all his others'; he is 'just one half of a great writer' and could do with being boiled down by 'Peer Gynt's button moulder' with 'some ordinary mechanic writer who can spin him a common likely plot'. Sends love to Bob and wishes 'success to his Solomon, and the Sage' [a reference to Bob's "Foolishness of Solomon"?].

Note from Janet offering condolences for 'poor Nurse Catt's departure'; asks to be remembered to her before she leaves.

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