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Sidgwick, William Carr (1834-1919) fellow and tutor at Merton College, Oxford
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Thinks that his illness was due to something he ate. Declares that he enjoyed his visit to [London], and sent an account of the visit to [ ]. Reports that Mr Wheatley [his godfather] was very kind to the. Declares that he would like to see Miss Green [his former governess] if his mother can induce her to stay until he [and his brother William] come home. Refers to his mother's advice about his chess playing and assures her that he has not played more that five games 'since the beginning of the quarter...' Asks her to buy something for [his friend] Harry James out of his money. Explains how they were 'got into the 2nd class in German', and in relation to the play declares that they do not have to translate it themselves. Sends his love to all at home, 'including Elizabeth [Cooper]'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

Informs her that they have posts there [in Keswick] occasionally, if she wishes to write. Writes a list of 'pros and cons' in relation to their accommodation. Concludes that on the whole 'it is the best situation in Borrowdale: and therefore in the English Lakes: and therefore, for short mountain walks, in the World'. Admits to not liking the scenery as much as he did three years previously, and thinks that neither does William, but concedes that the scenery is beautiful.

Reports that they have met Edmund Fisher and his wife, 'who is nice and prettyish'. Announces that he reviewed a poem called Ludibria Lunae in the Spectator. It is a satire on the efforts to emancipate women from their subjection, and he claims to have tried to be as stinging as he could, without showing that he had lost his temper. Announces that they expect [G. O.] Trevelyan soon, and that he is to be married on 24 September. Reports that William 'does not seem unwell particularly', but his sleeping has not improved as much as they had hoped. Sends his love to Edward and the children. Asks if she heard that F[rederic] Fisher was engaged to his Bishop's daughter [Agnes, daughter of the Bishop of London, John Jackson].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Cambridge]:- Regrets that he cannot accept his Aunt [Henrietta?] Croft's invitation as he is engaged every morning from 8 to 2. Hopes to be able to go over to Bedford sometime, but it must be in vacation time. Talks of arrangements for meeting in winter, but announces that he wishes to spend the last month of the vacation in Cambridge learning Hebrew. Reports on Arthur's health and states that he is very cheerful and jolly. Hopes that William is coming to stay with him at the end of term. Comments on the weather, which had turned that day into 'what foreigners call "English weather".' Remarks that he was often taken for a Londoner in Germany. Reports that he is engaged now six hours a day 'in pure talking', and teaches for two hours a week at the Working Men's College; amongst others there, he instructs 'a converted Jew in the rudiments of Latin', who was 'brought by a queer enthusiastic Syrian traveller' whom they have among their fellows. Sends his love to his aunt and uncle [William and Stephana], and sends Arthur's love to his mother.

Letters from Nora and Henry Sidgwick to Mary Sidgwick

Nora remarks on how sad it is that her and Henry's quiet time [in Paris on their honeymoon] is coming to an end, and how quickly the time has passed, but how long it seems since their wedding day. They go to Rouen the following day and then by Amiens to Calais, from where they will cross the channel back to England. They must be at Carlton Gardens the following Tuesday as Henry must look over some examination papers. They go to Cambridge on the following Friday for one day and return to London until the Monday following when they settle at Cambridge.

If the following day is as delightful as that day they may stay on in Paris 'till the last minute', because it 'does look lovely in the sun, with the fresh green trees, and the chestnuts just coming into flower'. They have been two or three times 'to the play, and enjoyed the excellent acting very much': last night they heard Racine's Athalie, and found it dull, but there were 'two very good little comedies afterwards'.

Henry writes that he is sorry to hear that William has been so depressed; hopes that the change will do him good, and that he will come over to Cambridge as soon as possible. Undertakes to write to him in the next couple of days. In relation to his mother's 'Munificent offer', states that Nora says that they have no breakfast service, dinner service, glass or cruet stand; they would be very grateful if she were to give them any of these. They have looked at the china shops in Paris, but prefer London pottery. Is sure that the crest sent to Arthur Balfour [see 105/9] was satisfactory. Notes on Saturday, 22 April that the morning is 'perfectly Lovely, and it is Madness to leave Paris, but Nora has an extravagant passion for church architecture, and is carrying [him] off to Rouen.' They will cross the channel on the following Monday or Tuesday, and have arranged to be at 4 Carlton Gardens on Tuesday; will write again from there.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to inform her that he shall come on the following Wednesday. Reports that he shall be staying with Mrs Clough from Monday to Wednesday if his cold does not get worse. Claims that he accepted her invitation gladly, as there is a new edition of Clough's Remains passing through the press, and he would like to talk to her about it. Intends to speak to his mother about Mr Horton and other matters on Wednesday evening, 'before Edward and Mary come'.

Asks if she has heard from William, and states that he has not found time to write to him yet. Asks her opinion on Noel's poems. Refers to the review of them in the Athenaeum, and states that Noel has told him that the two great critics of the age, M. Arnold and S[aint] Beuve, 'have both expressed themselves pleased by the book.' Reports that he has 'got rid of' his last pupil and is writing a paper for his philological journal. Reports that Patterson's book on Hungary is very nearly finished, and that he has seen most of it, and thinks that it will be both worth reading and readable.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Informs her that if she thinks it worthwhile to take lodgings beforehand, he thinks that Ambleside 'will be as good a place as any other.' Also mentions Grasmere as a possibility for the first week, and then on to Borrowdale. Announces that he shall be ready to go 'about the 6th or 7th', and hopes that she will have seen William before this; did not think William seemed ill, but 'he is certainly somewhat nervous, languid and irresolute...' Believes, however, that he appeared to like the idea of going to the Lakes. States that he enjoyed his visit 'L.W.C.' [to Wellington College] very much; Mary seemed very well, and that the children were delightful. Reports that he had 'some intimate talk with Edward on religious subjects, which was thoroughly pleasant and satisfactory' to him.

Letter from Isabel Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick

States that by Herbert [her son]'s kind help she is in time to greet Nora the following day. Sends their love to her and best wishes that she may have comfort and the joy of knowing her work is of increasing value. Remarks that Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir seems to be occupying much attention. Has just come from a visit to the O[gles] in London; reports that everybody she met spoke of the great pleasure the book was giving them. Liked the review of it in the Times Literary Supplement, but did not like the one by H. Paul. Adds that those to whom she spoke in London said that the effect of the book was to make them feel as though they had been talking to Henry again.

States that the effect of melancholy to which the reviews allude could not be avoided 'because the letters naturally deal so much with his theological feelings and his deep thoughts on life.' Claims that he was 'so bright and happy in his intercourse with his friends', and how he showed his best side when he felt 'the answering sympathy'. Refers to his complaint of the want of humour in George Eliot, and declares that she has just been reading some of her work, and 'had been feeling this so much - in spite of Mrs Poyser [in Adam Bede] and the 4 aunts'. Declares that they are glad to see that Arthur Balfour 'is so much better for his sea air' and hopes that Monday night won't try him too much. Reports that she had lunch with Nevil the previous day at Lincoln College, and that he could only spare her three hours. Refers also to Arthur. Has been reading [Memoirs of] Archbishop Temple , and remarks on how carelessly it has been edited [by E. G. Sandford]. Remarks that Henry's memoir is 'a charming size', and that one volume is much more likely to be read than two.

Sidgwick, Sarah Isabella (1832-1918) wife of William Carr Sidgwick

Letter from F. Y. Edgeworth to Henry Sidgwick

Writes in relation to the subject of taxation, and to their slight difference of opinion in the matter. Refers to the principles of William Sidgwick, to common expenditure, the burden of taxation, direct taxation and taxation on commodities.

Edgeworth, Francis Ysidro (1845–1926) economist

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Reports on how his days are spent. Mentions William's visit to his family home. Is glad to hear his mother's good account of Minnie. Reports that he had a letter from Edward [Benson] some days previously; believes him not to be 'the right man in the right place', and thinks of him as 'thrown away' in his role as headmaster. In relation to a proposed stay at Sydenham declares himself to be 'tolerably indifferent', and states that he only wants to be able to see her and have the opportunity of quiet study. Thinks however that it might be a bore 'going and settling down for a short time [especially Xmas time] in a place' where they know nobody and have no introductions. Asks if her idea includes Edward and Minnie. Gives his own ideas in relation to how the time should be spent; 'paying visits vaguely and spending the rest of the time at Cambridge', and a week or so at Rugby. His idea, however, does not include William. Admits that he would enjoy being near London. Reports that Arthur is very well 'under his gymnastics' Announces that he is going on Tuesday to stay a night with a friend 'who has been among the D[ ] and [ ]'. Informs her that there is a little book about the latter by Lord Carnarvon. Asks if she has seen Dr [Joseph?] Wolff's life.

Letter from Nora Sidgwick to Mary Sidgwick

Since returning to England from Paris she has been very busy with various activities, which delayed her writing to Mary. It is very pleasant being settled in their own house in Cambridge, even though it is only a temporary one. Asks Mary when she intends to come to stay with her and Henry. They have got a cook, who is coming to them on 9 May for a month's trial period. Hopes that William and Isabel have arrived and are well, and sends her and Henry's love to them. Wishes that they could both come to see them, but is glad that William can see Mary. Adds that the cruet stand they want is a stand for oil and vinegar and sauces, and on the strength of what Mary said, Nora chose one in London that cost £7 or £8. Asks if they may wait about 'the other things' like china and glass, until they move into their new house, as they have the use of the Fawcett's things in the house where they are at present living. Sends a photograph of herself [not included], and explains that Henry's have not yet come. They only came to Cambridge from London the previous morning, but visited for a day the previous week as Henry had an examiners' meeting. Thinks the decoration of the house in which they are now living would amuse Mary; describes the drawing room, which they do not much like.

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he intends to come to visit her 'from the 4th to the 11th'. Reports that he is up in Trinity College, working, and that he feels very well after a pleasant visit to Oxford. Reports that William seemed in very good spirits, and that he was sleeping 'very fairly' and hunts every other day. Desires to hear the Rugby news, and asks who are the five old Rugbeians. Reports that he wrote a letter to the Times, but that it was not published. Reports that he received a letter from his nephew Martin, which was 'very nicely written and with that curious mixture of childish and prematurely adult phraseology that one sees in a precocious child'. Asks her to tell him when Mary is going to visit her, and supposes that Edward will be very busy all the vacation.

Asks his mother's opinion on 'the new Tennyson'. States that they [in Trinity College] regard it 'as rather an imposition on the part of the publisher - republishing the Morte d'Arthur...and having so few lines in a page.' Complains that it is as bad as one of Victor Hugo's novels. Refers to a reading of the poem called The Higher Pantheism by Tennyson himself at a meeting of the Metaphysical Society, and to Tyndall's reaction to it. Remarks on 'how busy Death has been' during the previous six months among those whom he knows. Reports that he has just heard of the death of one of the Clifton Masters called Cay.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to try to locate a book, [Pneumatologie:] Des Esprits... by Mirville, which was lent to him by Miss Attersoll, and which he gave to his mother 'some time ago'. Explains that Attersoll has written to him asking for it. Wonders whether she is 'a favourable subject for a convert', and intends to try to instil 'a little "Spiritualism" into her by recommending her another book or two of the same kind.' Reports that they expect their Greek professor to be elected the following day [Benjamin Hall Kennedy was chosen]. Refers to the fact that William is to write one of the Reform essays, and that it is advertised in the Pall Mall Gazette. Informs her that Mr and Mrs Paul are to come 'some time in the week after Easter.' Recommends a vendor of Hungarian wines, and suggests three labels. Hopes that Mr Martin is getting better, and reports that he went to see him the previous day. Admits that he is quite worried about his friend Cowell, whose father has just died very suddenly.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he intends spending Thursday night in London, and will come down to her in the afternoon of Good Friday. Discusses the suggestion made by William to invite his friend Robert Williams - a newly elected fellow of Merton - to Rugby. Opposes the idea on the grounds of its 'extreme oddness', without having made further acquaintance. Announces that Mr and Mrs Paul are to come on Easter Monday.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he would like to hold a dinner party, to which he would invite Temple, [Jex-]Blake, Scott, Wilson, Kitchener, Philpotts, [Lee?] Warner, or some of them. States that she may leave the 'other matter' until he comes. Explains that he does not want [Robert] Williams asked as his friend, as he has only just met him, and believes it to be quite strange 'to make that sort of advances to men'. Undertakes to entertain the man if he is asked entirely on his mother's and William's account. States that he will come on Friday at 7.

Letter from Charles H. Tawney to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for her letter of 12 September. Regrets to say that he has been in the habit of destroying letters; however, he has usually kept one from each friend, and adds that he has one written by J.J. Cowell. Sends one to Nora [not included]. Undertakes to send more if and when he comes across them, but explains that in cleaning out his rooms in Calcutta he used to destroy letters. States that he walked about too much in the hot weather in the Isle of Wight, and has not fully recovered. Regrets that he did not pay a third visit 'to that place near the Langham. States that he may be able to recall facts about Henry's early life, and adds that [C.E.?] Bernard was also with him at Bishop's College. Claims that then Henry was 'as good in mathematics as in classics.' His wife sends her love, and hopes that some day Nora will be able to go and see them. Declares that Annie Latham has often talked to him of Fontainebleau. Adds that he still possesses the Hippolytus [by Euripides] that Henry and he read together 'at that house in Redland', and recalls that they 'all used to play in a sort of alley with trees behind it, Bernard, Lawrence, W. Sidgwick and Arthur S.'

Tawney, Charles Henry (1837-1922) Sanskrit scholar

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he arrived safe [in Cambridge] the previous night. States that the Windermere Hotel was very good. Refers to his journey to Bowness and Rugby. Reports that many people are still up in Cambridge, and that he has begun work. Thanks her for sending him a book and letters. Reports that the previous day was 'splendid', and hopes that William and his uncle 'are having it fine' that day.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Regrets that Symonds is too ill to come to Rugby; Henry would like his mother to have met Mrs Symonds, of whom he is very fond. Is unsure when he shall come to visit his mother, but mentions some time in Passion Week, if she has room for him. Is glad to hear that she had a pleasant visit at Oxford. Refers to William and his health problems, and to the probable benefits to him of 'the change of scene and work.' Remarks that the Universities are full of change and restlessness, and that 'there is very little prospect of [ ] for most people who stay on there at present.' Refers to Trevelyan and his regret at not being able to assist their 'young friend' [Horton]. Does not know what to do for the latter now, but promises that if he sees his way 'to earwigging any other eminent statesman', he will. Asks if she has read Patterson's book, which he may review 'in the Academy.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to ask her to inform William of certain developments; that 'W.A. Wright [new member of the Ad Eundem] cannot come'; that he himself will come if his hayfever is not too bad; and that he has not yet heard from the other new member. States that he is glad to hear that he [William?] is going on so well. Expresses his regret at the news of 'the calamity', involving Dr Meyer. States that he has never met the latter, but that he has heard a good deal from Mary about a Miss Meyer. Reports that [in Cambridge] they are all 'quiet and prosperous', and that he is 'rather hard at work with a variety of teachings.' Asks whether she has got any subscriptions for him for the ladies' lectures. Reports that he has read the greater part of Disraeli's novel [Lothair?], and does not think it equal to the best of his earlier ones, but states that 'it is very light and amusing reading.' Does not think that he has read anything else lately except Rossetti's poems, some of which he judges to be 'splendid', but he would not recommend the whole book.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that were it not for the fact that he is to go to her in October, she would be very sorry to say that she cannot receive him that month. Reports that she was at Stone G[appe] a week previously, and was going again to the Chancery, when she heard from William of their sudden move to Guernsey, so she hastened home. States that the 'whole party' seemed in good spirits, and hopes to hear the following day of their arrival in Guernsey. Refers to Henry's attitude towards the move, and to William's return to Oxford, which had proved to be a disappointment. Announces that she is going to see Minnie the following Monday, and will see Martin and Arthur before they go to school. Declares that the loss of 'the Crescent Villa family' is great, and hopes that the move may bring some greater good to William. Asks Henry to write to tell her when he is going to visit in October. Adds that William was anxious to know from Henry the day of the Ad Eundem, and whether he [Henry] could go to Oxford. Suggests that she could ask Mr and Mrs Trevelyan. Offers him lodgings on 20 September in Oxford, if he has 'any difficulty about a bed' and doesn't mind the distance from Lincoln College, and states that Mary could make him very comfortable there.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at the receipt of his book the previously night. Claims that she will not understand its subject, but that if she could send it forth to the world 'with a mother's loving dedication, it would be that all the philosophical world would be the better for reading it.' Hopes that 'they' have written to him from Rugby to tell him that they are meeting on 4 January, and informs him that 'A[rthur] S[idgwick] and Charlotte have their visit at N[ ] and the Chancery first, and don't get home again until Sat: 2[nd] Jan[uary].' States that William's work was to end the previous day, but that he has had a bad cold, and Isabel and his [son] have also been ill. Invites him to go to Oxford, and suggests that they all go to Rugby together. Mentions Henry's friends, and declares that she doesn't know what the Greens' plans are. Reports that she has seen a good deal of them, and that 'they are most kind.' Reports that Mrs Symonds was with them a short time ago, and 'just as [she] was going to have a nice [ ] [ ] with her, a telegram came to say that one of her children was in scarlet fever and she must go home.' Adds that it turned out that the fever 'was of a mild kind'. Presumes that he is 'still engaged with work for the Ladies', and insists that he take a holiday. Reports that Arthur Benson has had a rheumatic attack 'just as he was going in for the Term's Examination at Eton - and so missed it - which grieves him.' States that he was expected at home on Thursday or Friday, and that Martin comes home from Winchester the following Wednesday. Adds that Minnie and Edward are both well, but that the family could not join the 'Rugby party'.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Minnie kept her well-informed about Henry when at Lincoln, and that his own letter told her more. Refers to his activities with regard to his lectures and book. Asks him to go to Rugby around Christmas, 'when A[rthur] S[idgwick] wishes to assemble [them] for his house warming.' Adds that Minnie and Edward cannot go because their boys will just have arrived home from school. Expresses a strong wish that he should come to Oxford. Adds that Mr Green has been asking her when Henry is coming. Reports that William and Isabel are recovering from colds. Asks if he had told her that Captain and Mrs Go[ ] lived at Cambridge, and asks him to send her the address of Mrs Go[ ]'s sister Be[ ]. Informs him that his godson Willy [Longsden] 'has been doing better lately + is promoted to a "Top hat" ' at Merchant Taylors' school.

Reports that the Committee of the Association for the Education of Women at Manchester have asked Miss Cannan to be Secretary 'for that [work] where she lives - [ ] Prestwick.' Suggests that Miss Clough might like to be informed of this. Claims that she is 'still in rather a mess with carpenter + masons + painters to follow.' Adds that she has two comfortable beds to offer to friends, and tells him to bear it in mind if he wishes to go to Oxford. States that William and Isabel would be pleased to see him [and Nora] and that Mr Green and his wife always have a welcome for him. Reports tha the Symondses have come home from Switzerland. Reports that Edward Sidgwick wrote to her to tell her another daughter of his was born some weeks previously. States that he was much interested in what Henry had to say about spriritualism, and that their friends the Cooksons told them that Henry was at the Lakes and talking on the subject.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Thanks Myers for his letter regarding 'very satisfactory arrangements'. Reports that the musical box has been forwarded. Announces that they will arrive on 2 January at C[ ]. Regrets that they 'cannot interpolate Chelt. between Cam. and Clifton' because they expect his brother William and his wife rather late, and therefore must stay in Cambridge rather late.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses her delight at receiving word from Henry, and at knowing that he is not ill. Explains that she came to Budleigh Salterton to be with Miss Temple 'who has been poorly for many weeks'. The latter was disappointed that she could not go to Rugby for the Speech Day with her brother and nieces. Reports that William wrote to say that he was glad she was coming and thought 'that it was imprudent not to compress the business of moving into as short a space of time as possible'. States that she reached Exeter on 27 June with Katie and Agnes Temple, and came to Budleigh Salterton having spent two nights at the Palace, to which she returns on Saturday. Hopes to be at Rugby again the following week. Describes the scenery and the beneficial effects of the sea air.

Reports that she left Arthur and Charlotte well, and that Mr Whitel[ ]d 'is so poorly in a sort of low fever, as to be quite unequal to his work'. Adds that Mr J. Wilson's brother Charles 'is come to do what he can to help'. Reports that Mr Phillpotts has been away 'owing to the illnes of his eldest boy who is away from Rugby', suffering from some kind of fever also. States that Miss Temple read her 'part of a letter to the Bishop [her brother Frederick] from a clergyman of the name of Hawkins', who asked the Bishop's opinion on the subject of spiritualism, and promising to send him some 'Photographs of "Incarnate Spirits"' Adds that she has not seen the Bishop since, but hopes to ask him about the matter when she returns to Exeter. States that she talked to Mr George Woodhouse on the subject, and expresses her own interest in it.

Reports that Isabel's brother Reginald Thompson 'is lately married to a Miss de Morgan a daughter of the Mrs de Morgan who is a great spiritualist. Refers to Professor Clifton, who told Isabel and her 'some wonderful stories told him by the elder [Mr] de Morgan now dead.'

Relates that Minnie has been suffering from toothache, and that Edward is in full residence, and that they will not move away from Lincoln until the end of September or beginning of October. Adds that their boys, Martin and Arthur, are going for scholarship at Winchester and Eton respectively, about 21 July. Remarks that she thinks that 'C[harlotte] S[ophia] S[idgwick] is a great favourite with all who know her', and doesn't believe that Arthur 'will find any great defects of which he was not aware - such as want of higher culture etc.' Adds that she has 'a sweet gentle temper', which is 'very winning.' Is anxious to hear from Henry, and is glad that he wrote to Mrs [ ]well, from whom she has not heard since.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to the note that she wrote to him at the end of William's letter, and explains that she did not write since for fear of a letter not reaching him in Lucerne. Relates that she has been staying at Stone Gappe since, and has enjoyed her visit, despite the monotony of life and lack of amusement, and that 'all are so kind'. Describes the mountain air as refreshing, and claims that 'it seems to revive old feelings, and to bring vividly before one the days when life had never been a burden....' Claims to be grateful for the long holiday, but that much work remains to be done.

Fears that she has mislaid Henry's Exhibition Certificate, and undertakes to look for it when she goes home. States that her return home is delayed somewhat owing to her being unable to arrange her visits as she had wished. Believes that she will find solitude 'less irksome' than Henry imagines. Announces that she will go to Wellington College some time after her return home. Remarks that it seems a long time since she saw Minnie. Adds that she does not want either Minnie or Edward to feel that she 'should ever be the least restraint upon dear M.' States that she leaves Stone Gappe that day for Biddlesdon, where she shall be for about a fortnight, after which she intends to go to Leeds for ten days, and then home. Asks Henry to send her 'a Telegraphic message' if he is elected 'on the 29th', and wishes him success.

Remarks on Minnie going to Marlborough with Edward, who is to preach there, and on Mr Bradley having to entertain his company, 'Mrs. B. being upstairs!!' Reports that Arthur is at Wellington College, and will go to Marlborough with them. Adds that all send their love to Henry, and that Elizabeth [Cooper] is still there, but goes home on Monday.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Apologises for having neglected to write to him. Declares that her time at Wellington College has passed pleasantly, but has been devoid of incident. Refers to Minnie's happiness with Edward, and to her domestic activities. Remarks that Edward, although not ill now, needs rest. Looks forward to 'the happy Rugby Xmas', and declares that she is glad she kept on the house there. Is very glad that Henry will be at home all the vacation, and hopes that he will ask [A. J.] Patterson to come. Explains that during the latter half of the vacation Edward and Minnie and William will be gone, and suggests that he invites his friends then. States that she will ask William about his friends when she passes through Oxford the following Thursday, when she is to meet Lucy Brown and lunch with her in William's rooms.

Reports that Mr [Francis?] Martin has just been [at Wellington College], and told her that Henry is looking 'remarkably well'. Adds that she thinks that Henry should be doing lighter work. Tells him not to let Arthur work too hard. Reports that William was at Wellington College that previous Sunday, looking very well. Refers to 'the appointment [of H. M Butler as new headmaster] to Harrow', and remarks that '26 sounds very young', but that she hears that Butler 'is a very fit man.' Is glad to hear that Henry comes home on 15 [December]. Asks him to give the enclosed [not included] to Arthur.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Munich]:- Presumes that, since no letter was forwarded to him from Göttingen, there is a slim chance of his meeting up with his brothers in Switzerland. Asks her to let them know that he is anxious to hear of their plans. His own plans are 'an excursion to the Bavarian lakes, returning to Munich', and also a trip to Pontresina, where he intends to stay until 22 August. States that he if does not hear from Arthur and William there, he shall probably go to Zermatt and Riffelberg and 'homewards along the Rhone Valley to Geneva.' Claims that he finds it hard to leave Germany 'in this exciting time.' Reports that he could not go to Göttingen, as the lines were too much occupied with the transport of soldiers. States that he got to Nuremberg 'with some difficulty'. Claims to be very well, that he has 'left off' working and that he enjoys seeing the German towns, and hearing the talk of the people. Remarks that it is 'a grand time for Germany', in that 'the whole people is at length united in a just cause'. Reports that the bad feeling against England on account of 'sham-neutrality' is great, and does not think that it will easily be forgotten. Finds it 'rather disagreeable', especially as he sympathises with this attitude and thinks that Gladstone 'has been weak.' Considers coming to England at the end of the month. Adds that they are expecting a decisive battle. Believes that if Napoleon is beaten, 'he will make peace at once, if he can.' States that the doubt relates to whether the Germans will make peace without exacting when Napoleon cannot grant. Predicts that if Napoleon wins this battle, 'the war may last indefinitely.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes from 'a miserable inn at Friedrichshafen, on the Lake of Constance very much out of humour.' Reports that his ailment [the corn under his big toe] worsened, and prevented him from walking at all, and after 'a delightful day at Innsbruck... [he] gave up the idea of mountaineering and went to Venice, Verona and Milan'. Describes his three-day stay in Venice. From Milan he went to Bellaggio, and then over the Maloja to Pontresina, which he reached on 22 August, and found his mother's two letters, but none from William or Arthur. He then decided to 'take a taste of the Alps at Pontresina and then leave Switzerland; was unsure whether to return via Germany or France and was told at Chur that he could get through to Stuttgart in a day, but this has proved not to be the case and he finds himself detained for six hours in Friedrichshafen. Predicts that he shall 'no doubt come out at Cologne after a day or two, and then it will be comparatively plain sailing.

Asks her to thank his uncle for his kind invitation, which he would have accepted were it not for the pressures of work. Asks her to send any letters of his to Cambridge, and would like to know the names of the authors of the two letters she sent to Göttingen. Asks her to remember him to friends.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that she has been 'on the move' since Henry's letter reached her. Reports that William joined her at Aylesford on Thursday 28 June, and then they went to Rugby, where they spent a day with Mr and Mrs Dakyns. They then went to Llangollen. Describes their journey by coach to Capel Curig. Reports that William almost reached the top of Snowdon. Intends to write to Henry's aunt at Wellington College to see if she could receive him, and suggests that if she cannot, that he might come to her in Wales. Informs him of her plans to return to Wellington College, and states that Elizabeth [Cooper?] will be there the following week.

States that she was sorry to find that Mr and Mrs [Charles and Susanna?] Arnold had left Rugby, and that she did not whom else he 'could ask about Heidelbergh'. Suggests that C[hristopher?] Benson might know whether it is damp or not. Asks Henry to send her a book that 'will take a good deal of reading', and yet which she can understand. Suggest the 'Dialogues of Plato'. Relates a story which she heard from Captain [Cheese] at Aylesford about Mrs [Mary?] Pollard Urq[uhart] - 'a connexion of the [Thomas Hill?] Greens - who reported hearing 'distinct footsteps near her without her seeing any one', and also hearing 'a shrill scream equally unaccountable'. Offers to send 'names + places' if he is interested. Asks him to send her some poetry also. Inquires as to whether he has heard from Arthur, and if Mr [J. B.?] Lightfoot is gone.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Announces that she is back in Wellington College, having left William at Chester on his way to the Raikes [Robert Hodgson Sidgwick's house at Skipton]. States that he goes to Oxford, and then abroad, his final destination being Florence. Refers to the enclosed [letter; not included]. Reports that after leaving Beddgelert they went to Carnarvon, then to Bangor, and on to Llandudno. Adds that at Llandudno they met a group of relations - her brothers William and John, with their respective families, 'the M[ ]s - B[ ] - and Miss M[ ] and Miss [Wraith].' Reports that Minnie is very well. Announces that the [Grand] Speech day is on the following Tuesday. Remarks that Edward needs rest and a holiday. Adds that Elizabeth is there also. Also refers to Rugby. Asks him to tell her about spirit-rapping. Reports that she heard good news from Arthur, and that he is enjoying his sojourn immensely. Includes his address in Ambleside. States that '[t]hey are all charmed with Mr. Lightfoot', and describes his and Arthur's activities throughout the day. Asks Henry to tell her how he likes Berlin, and adds that there were no letters from Mrs [Susanna?] Arnold.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Regrets to say that he will not see William the following week. Reports that the latter has written to say that he does not feel well enough to come to the 'Ad Eundem'. Informs her that the marmalade has arrived, 'and is very nice.' Asks her to tell Arthur that they 'lost "the whole ticket" at the elections to Council.' Does not think that it will much matter, and states that '[t]he questions which are coming to the front now in Academic affairs are not of a party character.' Regrets to see that the same state of affairs does not exist 'in the metropolis: and that the worst features of Parliamentary Elections are to be introduced into the Elections of school-boards in the Metropolis'. States that he allowed his name to be put on Miss [Garrett]'s committee for Marylebone. Has learnt that the elections are to cost about £1,000 per candidate, and Miss [Garrett], 'standing on principles of peculiar p[ ] will only spend £500.' Adds that it is 'a terrible waste of money.' Reports that Trevelyan has been there 'in a very triumphant and anti-military state.' Quotes Seeley on opposition to a reform. Asks her opinion of Myers' last poem in Macmillan['s Magazine]. Thinks it 'very fine', and remarks that Myers' ability 'to write anything so like Pope shows great versatility of style.' Adds that he is glad that she liked Catherine Symonds.

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