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Moore, Thomas Sturge (1870-1944) writer and wood engraver
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Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Seatoller. - Expects Bob is enjoying himself abroad. Is having a good time at Seatoller with [Maurice?] Amos, [Ralph] Wedgwood and [George] Moore; Vaughan Williams left a few days ago; he and Wedgwood 'bathe in Cambridge pool every morning'; Amos and Wedgwood work hard for their triposes, while Moore chiefly reads "Jane Eyre" and other novels, and George 'all sorts of jolly books', none for his tripos. They are all getting on well, even better than at Stye since there is not the 'slight distance between Moore and Wedgwood'. They go up the mountains in the afternoon; he and Moore, as 'the Wordsworthians of the party' went over to Grasmere and Rydal; describes Dove Cottage, de Quincey's extension to it, and S.T.C. [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]'s house. Declares that there were 'men in England then', also naming Scott, Shelley, Byron and Keats. George got his scholarship; does not seem fair that Wedgwood has not, while they give one to someone like Charlie Buxton 'of very ordinary ability' in their first year; thinks this is 'bolstering up classics'. It is however a sign that the college is doing 'their duty to history' that there is now an entrance scholarship for it. Is glad at a personal level that Buxton has a scholarship: he and George will have plenty of money to go abroad in the long vacation now. Elliott has not got a scholarship, but is spoken of as 'certain' next year. Had a nice letter from Bowen; German measles is active in [Grove] house. Asks Bob to write to him about the novel if he needs someone to discuss it with: he knows the plan and beginning, and will keep it secret. Wedgwood is a really good rock climber. Notes in postscript that he will be seeing Moore's brother [Thomas] in London again next week, so Bob should write there.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - His and Bob's letters must have crossed. The stay at Seatoller ended on Thursday the 11th; he then went by himself to Melrose to walk in the Tweed and Yarrow valleys; came back to London on Saturday. Gives a rough sketch map of the area he visited, his impressions, and a brief synopsis of the role it played in Scottish history. Went to see the Moores at their home yesterday; talked for three hours with Tom, 'the most delightful person', who is writing 'another great poem on a classical subject'. Is going to Welcombe tomorrow for a few days before Cambridge; very glad Bob's book is going well, and will be interested to see it when he returns. Suggestions for Bob's 'ode [epic poem crossed through] on [George] getting the schol[arship]'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Dated 'Sunday'. Apologises for not sending the books earlier; was very busy with the lectures and with arranging for his parents visiting to see Helen [Coombe]; Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] and 'a sister' have also been staying. Has filled the box up with clothes which Mrs Smith [their landlady] thought Bob 'ought to want'. Says 'I told you so' about Bob being in Italy: it is better than 'going Jonkopping in Sweden [visiting Jönköping?]' and he might get some work done; suggests going to Fiesole or Prato, though that might be too hot. Asks if Bob intends to stay till winter; if so they will arrange to meet. Everything now settled: he and Helen hope to marry early in November and come out to Italy. Has had 'rather an awful time with his parents': very sorry for his father and his disappointment in him and so 'made a huge effort to get through the misunderstanding' but only gave him and his mother pain. This has made him 'awfully depressed'; found it hard to 'pull himself together for the lectures' but thinks they were the best he has done; pleased that both Goldie and [Thomas Sturge?] Moore liked them. Has been bicycling with Goldie, who is 'getting more reconciled about Helen'; thinks he 'begins to see that it can't make any real difference between [them]'. They went to Woodbridge and tried but failed to find [Edward] Fitzgerald's grave, then to Dedham 'which is the only [piece of French country in England and explains Constable'. Helen's harpsichord [which she is decorating for Arnold Dolmetsch] is 'going to be a great success'; she is 'quite decided' that Bob must either come back for the wedding or meet them in Italy.

Notebook with draft poems by R. C. Trevelyan, including some from "Mallow and Asphodel"; letters from Elsbeth Philipps and to Thomas Sturge Moore

Draft [?] letter from Trevelyan, Roundhurst, Hazelmere, to 'My dear Censor' [Thomas Sturge Moore], with 'a few timid verses'; Trevelyan does not think highly of them. Has written 'a great deal of the longer poem', though is now 'a little stuck'. Is coming to London on Tuesday, and staying with [Edward] Marsh until Saturday; asks if he could stay with Moore in Highgate, as his other evenings are taken up with concerts. Has just received a notice for the "Dial" [Shannon and Ricketts' 'occasional magazine'], which looks good; is 'especially glad to see "Centaur" in it. Asks why there is only one woodcut [by Moore] in it. A version of "Archilochus, serving as a hireling..." [published in "Mallow and Asphodel"] follows, with many corrections in both pen and pencil; a note from Trevelyan at the end says that he does not like the 'end part, apart from its not being particular [sic] original'.

Two bifolia with draft version of "The Sadness of Neobule, when the Spring returning does not bring Archilochus with it" [published in "Mallow and Asphodel"]. Two sheets of paper with draft verses, beginning "Her bright authentic image", and "But a sudden wind..." [three lines only]. Three sheets of paper with drafts of the first part of "For a Fan" ["Mallow and Asphodel"]. Two sheets of paper with draft poems, first beginning "Ah! will Joy come back again..." and "Therefore to bright Aphrodite..."

Book contains various drafts of verse, and a small section of prose [f 12]. Trevelyan uses the book from each end. Six loose sheets from this book folded together, with poem, "Come little fishes, gather round my hook" [between ff 40-41]. Draft (incomplete) of "Epimetheus" [published in "Mallow and Asphodel"], 35r-28r.

Notebook with part of a verse play by R. C. Trevelyan, with letters and other inserts

Text on recto, with additions and corrections on facing pages; extract from play begins with dialogue between Godfrey and Raymond. Insertions [between ff. 8 and 9]: three lined sheets with draft of this portion of the play, several gaps filled in with pencil with suggested dialogue or précis of ground to be covered; three sheets [perhaps from an account book?] with dialogue between Eustace and a forester.

Letter, 14 Oct 1900, from Sophia Caroline Reid to R. C. Trevelyan, written at Selham House, Petworth. - Wonders if Trevelyan is in the neighbourhood, or is likely to be; came here a week ago to stay with her nephew Charles Lacaita and his wife [Mary]; will leave the week after next so fears there is little chance of seeing Trevelyan and making his wife's acquaintance until they come to Ravello. She herself hopes to be there by the end of October. She and Miss Allen were in London for the very hot week in July, looking to hire a new maid; she has 'secured a Swiss woman' whom she hopes will appreciate Ravello. She then spent several weeks in Scotland; enjoyed seeing friends and relations but found 'the climate very trying', with 'almost constant rain' so she did very little travelling. Madame Palumbo [Elizabeth von Wartburg] went with Jipi [?] to Switzerland for several weeks and is better for the rest and change on her return to Ravello; thinks the Pension [Palumbo] re-opens this week; knows Madame Palumbo will be very glad to welcome Trevelyan and his 'sposa' so hopes he will keep to his 'promise' and get there in 'good time'. Pencil notes in French on the back of the letter about the first Crusades and Gérard de Balagne [Godfrey de Bouillon?], also on one side of a printed sheet of meetings of Cambridge University congregation, sent out by Trinity College in October 1900, and a small slip of paper which has a reference to the "Histoire des Trou[badours] by Vaschalde.[with a shelf number, perhaps for the British Museum library?]; also on the back of the letter from Thomas Sturge Moore described below.

Letter [from Thomas Sturge Moore] sending his [poem] "Danaë" to Bob again; hopes it is 'improved'; it is 'certainly longer'. Also returns Bob's 'commentary' so he can see how many of his 'suggestions and corrections have produced an effect' and judge the result. Willing to act on others but thinks it best to talk them over with Bob first. Afraid that George [his brother] 'does not care' to correct now, and Thomas does not like to ask him when his 'interests lie so far apart from poems about little girls'. His eldest sister has done a 'great deal' for him recently, and he hopes she will continue to do so, but he thinks Bob should correct directly onto the proof. Meant to ask him to do this for "Absalom", but forgot. Is 'horrified' about "Danaë's" length and would be glad if about two hundred lines could be cut, but has not preference for one passage over another. Very grateful to Bob for 'taking so much pains'. As well as the pencil notes on the Crusades, the letter has also been used by Trevelyan to note down the name of a hotel, 'Hotel St. Romain, Rue St. Roc [Paris] and a reference to printer Firmin Didot.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Mentions a 'heated Wagnerian discord' on the last occasion he and Trevelyan met; expects he himself as a third party was most exasperating. Wishes they were coming north to see Trevelyan: wants to talk to him about Moore's poems ["The Vinedresser and Other Poems"?] which he tends to appreciate. Sees many traces of [George] Meredith there. Discusses books: [William] Roscoe's life of Lorenzo [de' Medici] is very good; didn't see the Leonardo but thinks it must be incomplete, as well as 'faked and edited'; doesn't know Nicolini but expects it will be good reading; 'Eber's thing' [?] is very popular, he has not read it himself and does not think it can be first rate from its enthusiasts. Has painted a tempera picture of Shillingley Park [sic: Shillinglee Park?] which he thinks his best so far. Asks Trevelyan to visit before they go to Italy and see about his house.

Part letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Roundhurst, Haslemere, Surrey. - Apologises for not writing sooner: has taken him a while to gather his thoughts on English books for her to read. Has not read Browning's letters to his wife, but her father tells him they are quite amusing; if they are as good as the one she read out to him, they should certainly be worth reading. There is also Mackail's life of William Morris, which he intends to read as Mackail knew Morris well and is a 'competent writer'; saw an excerpt which looked fun, as it should as 'Morris was a magnificent joke himself as well as a splendid person'. Has not yet read Henry James's "The Awkward Age", which is said to surpass all his earlier ones in difficulty, but recommends "In The Cage", or "Daisy Miller". Next week T[homas Sturge] Moore's book, "The Vinedresser and Other Poems" comes out, but he is sending a copy to the Grandmonts; is not sure whether they will like it, as it has 'great faults, which people with classical tastes are almost sure to dislike', but believes many of the poems are 'nearly perfect in their own queer way'. Recommends his father's book, "The American Revolution Pt I" which is 'at least readable and amusing"; his brother George's "The Age of Wycliffe" has already gone into a second edition. The middle part of the letter can be found as 13/85.

Ends by telling Bessie to get the third volume of Yeats' edition of Blake, 'read all the poetry that is not mad' and "The Book [Marriage] of Heaven and Hell", and look at the pictures. Hopes Miss [Emma?] Dahlerup is well; expects she will be going to Capri or nearby soon. Asks to be remembered to the Grandmonts.

Part letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven, with extract from poem based on the "Mahabharata" by Trevelyan

Begins mid-sentence stating that [his brother George's book "The Age of Wycliffe"] is 'a good piece of history', which shows up John of Gaunt as 'a sort of 14th century Taman[n]y ring boss'. Also recommends Rostand's "Les Romanesques", which he read recently and things is even better than "Cyrano". Cannot think of any more modern books for the moment; fears his list is 'chiefly composed of friends' and relations' books'; [Roger] Fry is also bringing out his book on Bellini soon, which is well worth getting. Asks Elizabeth to tell Mrs Grandmont that the Frys would like her to visit when she is in England; gives their address. He himself is getting a house near Dorking at Westcott, and will move in September, when he will be within a mile of the Frys; the house he is giving up at Haslemere is, though, very beautiful. Supposes she has been back from Taormina a while; asks her to send some photographs, especially the ones of 'Mrs. Cacc. [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan] and the dogs' and himself in the loggia. The last few days of scirocco were 'a great bore', but he almost forgives it for preventing the trip up Monte Xerito as it 'made [them] those splendid waves among the rocks'; it also 'put [Elizabeth's] fiddle out of sorts' though, so he could not hear any more Bach suites. Heard Isaye [sic: Ysaÿe] play one yesterday, as well as the Mendelsohn concerto; he was in good form, and he will hear him again playing the Beethoven. Is having a musical week, as he has already seen Paderewski, for the first time, and will hear [Wagner's] "Tristram" tomorrow. 'Paddy was great fun, at all events to look at'; thinks he played a Chopin concerto better than the Beethoven. Spends most of his time at the British Museum library when he is in London; has found a translation of [Joost van den] Vondel there by a Dutch American; it is 'very conscientious and scholarly' but he does not think much of the blank verse; still, he can now go on where Elizabeth left off. Would like to know when Mrs G[randmont] is coming to England, and if Elizabeth is likely to be in London so he can 'make a display of [his] extensive and profound knowledge of Italian painting in the National Gallery'. Not sure whether he is going to Bayreuth yet; discusses times he could come to Holland.

Suggests older books she should read: Keats's letters, most of which are available in Sidney Colvin's edition though he advises getting Buxton Forman's four volume edition with the poetry; Butcher and Lang's translation of the "Odyssey"; Meinhold's "Sidonia the Sorceress" and "Amber Witch", translated by Lady Wilde and Lady Duff Gordon. Could lend her all of these books, as well as [Henry James's] "In a Cage" and his brother and father's books . Asks her to write with news and to say when would be best for him to come to Holland; he will write soon to the Grandmonts when he sends them [Thomas Sturge?] Moore's book. Thinks he remembers Elizabeth said she had never read Jane Austen; she should read them all, especially "Mansfield Park", "Pride and Prejudice" and "Emma". Breaks off mid -sentence: 'by advising to...': 9/71 forms the rest of the letter.

A portion of what seems to be a poem by Robert Trevelyan based on the "Mahabharata", with some explanatory notes, is found with this letter but not referred to in it

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Blames the 'heat which brings on indolence' for his delay in replying to her last letter. Saw Madame Grandmont at the Bowmans', where he spent a very pleasant evening; she has since written to say he can visit in early September, so asks Bessie to tell her that will suit him very well. Is not going to Bayreuth, so will come straight out to Holland, which he is looking forward to seeing again. Has left the heat in the South of England and come up to 'the cool and airy atmosphere of Northumberland'. Is glad she likes the Odyssey; her translation is 'quite correct and scholarly', although a little too Biblical and free with 'withals' and 'verilys'. Agrees generally with what she says about [Henry] James: he need not always be so obscure, though 'vague ideas can often only be vaguely expressed'; discusses some of the characters and scenes he admires. Supposes she will be going to Denmark now; hopes she enjoys her music there; he has heard little for weeks and fears he will not until he goes to Holland. Is glad she enjoyed "Marrow and Asparagus" [his "Mallow and Asphodel"]; but she must like [Thomas Sturge] Moore's poems better, particularly "The Vinedresser", "The Panther", and "At Bethel"; the parts of Moore's poetry he likes 'mean more to [him] than anything that has appeared in England since Browning's early and great days". Will send for [Lagerlof's] "Antichrist Miracles" as is keen to see Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] 'glorified by fiction', even if she is depicted as 'a witch or Fiery, instead of the mild lady she really is'; has always intended to make her 'the subject of a romance' when he takes to writing novels in his old age. Bessie can keep [his father's] "American Revolution" until he comes. Asks to be remembered to the Grandmonts. His father has just bought a Madonna by [Francesco] Francia; they are all very pleased with it, though he is amused by the comments of the servants. The butler secretly prefers the not very good copy of Raphael's "Madonna della seggiola" which used to hang in the room; he says the 'lady' is pretty '(being good protestants, they won't call her the Madonna or the Virgin)', but the baby is 'rather a funny-shaped baby', and at least Raphael gave his child some clothing; says Mrs Prestwitch [sic: Mary Prestwich] (the old nurse, now housekeeper) knows more about babies than he does, and she is not sure about the baby; supposes neither he nor his brothers were 'exactly that type of infant' when they were in her nursery.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Apologises for not replying sooner; went to Cambridge on Saturday and found 'so much to do and talk about' that there was no time to write. Is going to Dorking tomorrow as his furniture is coming; the house should have been ready a week ago. Will dine with his mother that evening, then on Thursday he is going to Harrow to play [rugby] football against the school on Founders' Day; afterwards will dine at the Headmasters' and go to a 'smoking concert'; the day after that he will dine at his father's club. Will only then really begin the solitude of his 'rural retreat' and is looking forward to 'a quiet and industrious time at last'. Glad Bessie liked the Frys and they got on well with her uncle; not surprised she found 'a certain difficulty in becoming intimate with them', since he thinks Fry's mind is very different to hers and that he is not always quick to adapt himself, while Helen Fry is not like that but is often 'rather diplomatic in conversation until she knows all about a person'; this is not insincerity, as some people think. Heard from them today [see 4/27]; they enjoyed their visit, and Fry seems to have taken 'tremendously' to her uncle and aunt. Went to Highgate last week to see Tom [Sturge] Moore the poet, who read two new poems; criticises the first line of the one about Leda and the swan; Moore is 'always charmingly good-natured when one criticises, and sometimes even will be convinced.' Spent most of yesterday talking to Tom's brother [George] the philosopher. Great excitement at Trinity as the philosopher MacTaggart [sic: John McTaggart], who used to 'disapprove of marriage on metaphysical grounds, is bringing home a New Zealand hospital nurse called Daisy Bird as his wife'; he may need consolation as on his return from his year in New Zealand he will find that Moore and another [Bertrand Russell?], 'his most promising pupils and followers, have set up an entirely new and antagonistic system of the universe'. Sat at dinner at Trinity next to a science fellow [John Newport?] Langley whom he likes very much, who knows and thinks highly of [Ambrosius?] Hubrecht; Langley asked whether "[Till] Eulenspiegel" was originally written in Flanders; perhaps Grandmont knows. Has begun to learn German; finding it easier than expected in some ways, but has not yet got far. What Bessie says about women's tendency to either conceal or be overly frank about their ages seems more or less true to him; her allusion to his having had 'the benefit of women's society and friendship' amuses him, as if she wanted to make him 'a sort of Platonic and sentimental Don Juan' which he is certainly not; before her he has known very few women well, and only in one or two cases has he known them ' rather sentimentally' at some point; does not consider himself 'at all learned in women's psychology and character'. Finishing this letter in the room of a friend who has 'studied the female character far more profoundly', but since he has never fallen in love to his knowledge, Bob looks on him as his inferior.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Lungarno Acciajuoli, Florence. - Is glad Trevelyan is coming out to Italy: they must meet. Trevelyan must not be discouraged by his current difficulties. When B.B. and he were discussing Moore's book [Thomas Sturge Moore's "The Vinedresser and Other Poems"?], Berenson said he found 'far more poetry... and sense of beauty' in Trevelyan's. Has had letter from Binyon: hopes Trevelyan will see him before he comes abroad, as the 'whole business' [the quarrel over the publication of Fry's book on Bellini, see 4/28] must end soon. The 'Frullinites' are being 'chary': it's best to visit them rather than stay; has met Loeser whose personality makes Berenson's attitude understandable.

Letter from Thomas Sturge Moore to R. C. Trevelyan

Congratulates Trevy [on his engagement] and wishes him 'all happiness'; on hearing about it beforehand from [Charles] Holmes and [Laurence] Binyon, who had heard through [Sydney] Cockerell and Trevy's cousins the Fletchers, he had 'refused to believe it' due to what Trevy had told him about 'Mrs Costello[e] having tried to put about such stories'. However, when his sister heard the same from Miss [Bonté?] Amos, who said she had got the news from Trevy's mother, he 'had to allow it might be true'. Thinks Trevy will 'make a good husband', but that he will 'spoil all [his] children with indulgence' and thinks he should start being 'very stern' with himself so that he is able to look 'cross' enough at them; knows he is talking 'as if the little Homers and Aeschylluses [sic] and a Sappho or two were bound to turn up' and hopes they will. Keen to meet Trevy's fiancé; hopes she is not 'too like George' and suggests that the only indication which Trevy has given as to what she is like ''is very misleading and puts one deeper into darkness than total ignorance'. Asks how long Trevy has know her, and if she is 'connected with the admirers of the Dutch Milton [Vondel?]' whom he met at Taormina. Is to get a hundred pounds for editing Shakespeare [for the Vale Press] and fears it will take up a lot of time, so cannot promise to write an epithalamium. [Roger] Fry is 'of course quite wrong about Bellini', whom Moore admires as much as Fry does, but denies that he is 'characterised by passion by pathos or by Virgillian [sic] melancholy'; Bellini is a 'far greater master than Altdorfer' though Fry seemed to think he was comparing them. Sorry that Trevy is troubling to copy out Moore's "Danaë"; he could easily have got two copies made; hopes he will 'suggest how the hard sentences can be made easy, & the crooked straight, at the same time as pointing out their deficiency'. Hopes Trevy's fiancée 'will prove a Muse... though she is not going to enter the lists as a rival'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso Amalfi. - Thanks Bessie for her letters and its enclosures; Grandmont's letter is 'a marvel of elegance'; is glad that [Empedocle?] Gaglio is 'showing such character and capability'; reminisces about a former excursion from which a companion [Bessie] 'returned early to Taormina' on a 'frivolous' excuse. Returns his mother's letter; would be nice for her to call Bessie 'Elizabeth' but they must decide; will be a comfort to her when Bessie is looking after him, but thinks 'she exaggerates the discomfort and untidiness of [his] life at Roundhurst'; he may have been untidy in dress when not likely to meet any one, but Mrs Enticknap would not have allowed anything worse. There is a strong south wind and the 'sea is booming loudly down below on the rocks'. Has had a busy day with correspondence, copying [Thomas Sturge Moore's] "Danaë", calling on Mrs Reid and talking to an interesting fellow guest [C. P. Scott, see 9/92]. Hopes to do a little work tomorrow.

Returns to the letter the following morning; was a thunderstorm, not the sea, which he heard last night; it is still raining heavily, so he will finish writing letters and 'read all sorts of nice things'. Gives a long extract from Chaucer's "Merchant's Tale" on 'the terrors of married life'; pretends to contemplate heeding the warning, but [John] McTaggart's letter 'tells a quite different tale'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso Amalfi. - Corrects Bessie's Italian for his address. Details of post times. The weather continues to be bad so he has been reading, writing letters, and finishing copying out [Thomas Sturge Moore's] "Danaë". Thanks her for sending on the "Chronicle". Has written for the "Manchester Guardian", as he agrees with it about the [Second Boer] War; its editor [C.P.] Scott was here when he arrived, and he had a long talk with him about the war. The "Guardian" is 'almost the best paper in England, being cosmopolitan'; is encouraged that Scott says he has 'kept most of his public, in spite of his attitude to the war', and that opposition to their policy led to the resignation of the "Chronicle's" editors, rather than public opinion. Hopes Bessie's visit to the dentist went well. Discussion of the lack of interest in romantic love in Sophocles and its treatment by the other ancient tragedians; contrasts this with the way 'almost all the great modern dramatis, Shakespear [sic], Racine, Molière, de Vega etc. fetch their subjects from Venus' archives'. Continues the letter later, after 'scribbling off a severe commentary on some of the obscurities in Moore's "Danaë"' and reading the first chapters of [Joseph Henry Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant", which Mrs Reid lent him this afternoon. Has told her about Bessie and she took a great interest; she is 'a dear old lady, and very kind' to him. Improvises a poem about being a black beetle crawling under Bessie's door to give her kisses.

Returns to the letter next evening; has been outside most of the day, spending the morning in Mrs Reid's garden, though not really able to work, and walking in the afternoon. Hopes to start work in a day or two on another play, not the one he showed Bessie. Has begun his commentary on Moore's "Danaë," but it will take him hours. Tells her to show the photographs his mother sent her to her uncle and aunt. Is touched by what she says about trusting him. Hopes that [Ambrose Hubrecht's] whale 'has been successfully dissected'; disappointed to hear 'he is not going to Utrecht whole, to be stuffed, or bottled.'

Continues the letter next day. Has been reading Chaucer and 'commenting on Danaë's little faults'. Perhaps exaggerated when he said 'modern art scarcely seemed to exist at all', but does feel that modern art is 'on the wrong lines', though 'men like Degas and Puvis de Chavannes and Whistler, and even often Watts and Burne Jones, have done great things'. Would be wrong to persuade himself that bad art was good, and there are times when 'circumstances have made great art difficult or impossible', such as literature in the middle ages. Does not think the Frys' attitude to art is exclusive; they may well be in music, but they know less about that.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi. - Filthy weather, as it has generally been since he arrived; has sent off his 'interminable commentary' on [Thomas Sturge Moore's] "Danaë", and has been reading Byron's play "Cain"; finds it 'surprisingly fine', though there are great faults, as in all of Byron; does not agree with Goethe's claim that Byron 'is a child the moment he begins to think'. Always pleased when he finds good things in Byron, as he is much criticised nowadays; people do not really read him, or 'only his inferior early things, e.g. Childe Harold'. Teases Bessie, pretending that 'an unconscionable young lady' keeps 'tormenting him with a stupid school-girl correspondence' and there is no telling where her reading of Plato may lead her. Is sorry that Bessie is having so bad a time with the dentist; best to go through with it in the end. Dined at Mrs Reid's last night, hearing 'local tales about brigands etc' and drinking good wine. They have 'some wonderful cats, the most beautiful [he] has ever seen'; would like to get 'one of the family some day'. Delighted to hear about [the birth of Bessie's niece] Amanda Röntgen; Bessie's aunt told him first, sends thanks for her letter. Copies out poems by Vaughn [sic: Henry Vaughan, "The Retreat"], and Blake ["Infant Joy"]. Will finish this letter and 'per-haps, as Grandmont says' send it by the early post. Is glad to have Bessie's photograph but wants the bigger one when she gets them.

Finishes the letter next day. Bad weather again; is not in good spirits as his host Palumbo is dangerously ill; Palumbo has suffered from the same paralysis before and may recover; he is a 'very good fellow' and Bob will be sorry if he dies; pities his wife and daughter. Has just read the news of the great British losses at Ladysmith; does not know whether this means the town has fallen, but it looks as though Methuen was not strong enough to relieve it; if Redvers Buller does not do better than Methuen, expects Ladysmith will fall in a few weeks and would wish that if it would lead to the reopening of peace negotiations, but this seems unlikely. Says Bessie 'deserve[s] a whipping' for interpreting his jealousy of the lovers in his carriage as a desire to hug his female fellow-travellers. Is very glad she likes the "Symposium" so much; discusses it briefly and suggests other dialogues by Plato she could read. Copies out Blake's "Infant Sorrow" and "Cradle Song". [His brother] Charlie's letter was very nice; is sure she will like him, and he 'evidently means to like [her]'. Reminds her that the new century does not begin until 1901. Glad her practising is going well.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello. - Has been out most of the day since there was some sunshine, and has written a few lines. Seems that old [Pasquale] Palumbo is 'in great danger'; has offered to move to another hotel for a week or two, but Pasquale's wife will not hear of it; she 'takes a sort of mother's care of him' and says the rooms of the Albergo Toro will be damp. Will stay for a while, but does not think he should stay if Palumbo gets worse; only Italians go to the Toro but sure he would be all right there. Has just received Stephen Philips' play about Paolo and Francesca; cannot see as much in it as 'many very clever people do'; it has 'effective theatrical scenes' and 'some rather fine poetry', and if it succeeds when acted next year it will make things easier for [Thomas Sturge] Moore and [Laurence] Binyon, and for himself, if he manages to finish a verse play, but it is still a bad play. Recommends that she read "Romeo and Juliet" and the "Merchant of Venice" if she has not already; thinks he should charge her a fee in kisses for giving her literary advice. Finishes writing for the day with a doggerel verse recommending that she wear socks in bed to keep warm.

Returns to the letter the following evening; glad she got on so well with the dentist, and 'recognises her portrait' in [Chaucer's] Merchant's Wyve. Hopes she will send her photograph soon. Found her account of 'the Russian ladies [Madame de Rhemen and Countess van Bylandt] and Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht; see 9/17]' very entertaining. Does not remember the Comtesse de Bylandt, but will ask his parents about her. Teases her for dreaming that she was married to [Bram] Eldering. Palumbo seems better today. Weather fine today, and he has got on well with his play; 'cannot get along in the rain'. Also thought of a new poem on Elijah in the desert, but might not write it now. Hopes to get over a month of work done, and not to return before the end of January; his mother has just written that she would like Bessie to stay with them at Welcombe early in February; thinks that would be the best plan, so he would probably not spend more than a few days in Holland on the way back; does not know whether it would be considered right to travel back together so she should ask her uncle and aunt.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Has had dreadful weather and not been able to work until a couple of days ago, as he was kept inside; began yesterday and is now getting on well. Will return at the end of January as his mother suggests, and thinks it would be convenient for Bessie to visit England early in February; would not stay in Holland long on the way back if so as he wants to keep writing. Will come to Welcombe as he thinks it would be best for her to visit to be there rather than London; the Frys have invited her to stay with them in Dorking for a few days, which would enable her to see [Robert's house at] Westcott. Asks his mother to send George's address again, as he wants to write to him. Old Palumbo has been very ill, and it was thought he would die; he is better now but if he were to worsen again Robert would move pension, though his address could remain the same. Has had nice letters [about his engagement] from almost all his friends. Wrote to [William] Morton Philips. [Frank] Previté has published a book of short stories, "My Great Discovery" with Smithers & Co., under the pseudonym 'Henry Frances' as he does not want his family to know. Gives the book his qualified praise, and suggests his mother try it. Is pleased with what he has written of his own play; thinks it is 'better conceived and better carried out than the last', but knows these feelings can be deceptive. Has read Stephen Philips' play "Paolo and Francesca" which is so popular at the moment: thinks there is 'some decent poetry of a not very high order, and a good deal of theatrical cleverness', but that it is a 'bad play, and pretentious too'. Must not make his mother think he is jealous; hopes it will succeed on the stage, as this will make things easier for [Thomas Sturge] Moore, Binyon, and himself. Bessie says she is sending some photos to his mother, and seems well. Asks if his mother remembers a Countess Bylandt, who says she used to know her and his father: Bessie met her the other day at the Hague.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello. - There is not sufficient paper in the hotel to answer her long letter as it deserves. Strange that he is not inspired to write Bessie love-poetry, but says he is 'not good at putting difficult and elaborate and wonderful thoughts into verse', which would be needed; will try one day. Sorry that Gredel [Guije] failed. Since he sometimes misses out words in his letters, Bessie need never be shocked by his 'wicked opinions' but can add 'nots' when she pleases and 'convert the sense to please [her] fancy'. Glad she is re-reading [Joseph Henry Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant". Sends her kisses "blown through the ether like waves of light or electricity'. Continues the letter next morning, copying out an extract about Shorthouse from a piece of paper in Mrs Reid's book an extract from a letter from Isabel Balfour; this recalls what his brother [George?] has heard about Shorthouse. The book reminds Bob of Pater's "Marius the Epicurean"; thinks one must have influenced the other; also thinks "Marius" the better book on the whole. Asks his waiter to settle their dispute about Italian grammar, which he does in Bob's favour. Returns to the letter in the afternoon: old Palumbo died this morning, and since his wife did not want Bob to leave, he is staying in a separate part of the house where he is 'quite out of the way'. News has just come that the Cappuccini hotel at Amalfi 'has subsided on a great part of it' and some people have been killed. Writes again in the evening having gone to see the landslip, which was as bad as the rumours; seven or eight people died, and 'part of the end of the hotel had gone'. The people say it is St. Francis' doing, "angry because his monastery had been put to base uses". Had never been to Amalfi before, though this is his third visit; not much to see 'except the people and the beggars', and the Cathedral is 'spoilt by restoring'. Palumbo was dying about the same time as the landslip, and the proprietor of the Cappuccini, a friend, was here comforting Madame Palumbo when the news about the hotel came. 'They say he almost fainted... [and] will probably be ruined, as no one will dare come to his hotel now'. Bob exerted himself greatly on the journey down to Amalfi and back and 'sweeted (in Grandmont language' despite the bitter cold.

Originally enclosing a 'charming letter from [Eddie] Marsh'; his 'first Cambridge friend' who works in the Colonial office 'though, like many there, he does not like the war'; gives a brief character sketch. Has also heard from [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson. Has not heard from [Bernard] Berenson, but has from [Mary] Costelloe, whom he just asked Berenson to tell; 'rather annoying', as he 'care[s] for Berenson very much, and dislike Mrs C.', though it was a 'perfectly proper letter'. Is very troubled by [Lina] Duff Gordon's letter: her wish for his happiness is 'unmistakeably sincere', as she always is, but her reply to his wish for them to remain as good friends is that since he told her nothing about this when he saw her 'constantly' in London last October, things can never be quite the same. It would have been very difficult to tell her, but feels that perhaps he should have done, not because she was an 'intimate friend' - the only one of his friends he told, 'for special reasons', was Fry - but because Mrs Costelloe had been spreading rumours that she was in love with him. Perhaps this was true, and he should have realised, although he does not think he gave her reason to believe he was in love with her; it is possible that Mrs Costelloe has stirred up trouble, as 'she has a great influence over Miss D. G.' and he believes her 'really to be a bad woman, though with many good qualities'. Is going to see Palumbo's funeral start for Naples. Writes again in the evening, after writing at 'my cliff, the Cembrone [Cimbrone]'. Quotes from a letter from Tom Moore: Moore thinks he will 'make a good husband' but spoil all his children. Has received Bessie's next letter, but not the photographs. He can skate, but not very well. Does not think Buller's defeat will make much difference to British attitudes to the [Second Boer] war; discussion of the war; does not think it would be good if all of South Africa were governed by the Dutch, would not object to 'an independent Dutch South Africa if it were well governed, and the natives treated properly' which currently happens in the Cape but not in the Transvaal. Methuen and probably Buller are not equal to the people against them, but this does not mean the English have fought badly; however, she need not worry that he is 'becoming Jingo'. Sorry Bessie has missed Tonina [van Riemsdijk]'s violin; when one good enough becomes available, will get it for her. They must visit Ravello together; Madame asked if they would come here on their honeymoon, which they will have to discuss; she intends to keep the hotel for some years at least.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Is writing to Trevelyan instead of working on his lectures on the Byzantines. Has just read [Stephen] Philips "P&F" ["Paolo and Francesca"] and shares Trevelyan's conclusions: it is very English and there is no real poetry in it. Trevelyan, Binyon and Moore are far superior, but it is Philips whom the critics praise. Has had an irritating letter from Mrs Grandmont. Yes, Moretto was a Brescian. Describes the Frys' journey back from Italy. Has been to Westcott and thinks the house will do very well: will get to work with the friezes soon. Helen says they will be delighted to have Amica [Elizabeth van der Hoeven] any time in February; hopes he will have some time free from lecturing to show her around Dorking. His arch at the New English [Art Club] looks 'abominable'. Hopes Trevelyan and Berenson will sort things out. Sends love to Ravello.

Letter from C. J. Holmes to R. C. Trevelyan

Hacon & Ricketts, The Vale Press, No. 17, Craven St., Strand, London. - Is answering Trevelyan's letter at one, 'partly for the pleasure of writing the above amazing date' and also to reassure him 'about the Shakespeare': had taken Trevelyan's letter as 'confirmation of [Thomas Sturge?] Moore's verbal request', so his 'early married life won't be embittered by the arrival of two sets'; in fact he would probably need to go to a bookseller if he wanted a second set. Now will 'turn... from these prosy things' to picture Trevelyan composing Pindaric poems to the 'Hieron of our latter day Syracuse' [Pindar wrote praise poems for that ruler, while the Athenians later mounted a military expedition against Syracuse, which Holmes compares to the present-day Second Boer War]: the 'simple Paul Kruger will smile at the new & glorious pedigree' which Trevelyan invents for him and performs to the accompaniment of his 'bride's Χρυσεα φορμιγξ [golden lyre: a reference to Pindar's first "Pythian Ode"] in Pretoria or 'Johannisberg [sic]'. Meanwhile, he hopes Trevelyan's Pindar is 'unencumbered with [John William] Donaldson's superfluous & interminable notes'. Wishes him 'good wishes for the end of this self satisfied century'. Postscript saying that Trevelyan should write directly to Moore if he wants his proofs, as they have none at the Press.

Poem and illustration by Thomas Sturge Moore

Postmarked Highgate; sent to R. C. Trevelyan at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italy. - Poem, beginning 'O Lyre divine what daring spirit', suggesting that Trevelyan escaped from the landslide at Amalfi in December 1899 and continued to compose his 'magnum opus' inspired by the Muses [he was in fact never endangered by it]. Annotation in pencil suggesting that he can 'exercise [his] powers of punctuation on this Dithyramb'.

Illustration by Moore showing the nine Muses, named, bearing Trevelyan about the disaster, while a rabbit labelled as 'sole survivor and timid observer' looks on.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Has been 'out composing verses in a tempest'. Glad she is having happy dreams; suggests analyses for her one about the cicalas [9/26]. Quotes from Moore on sleep [Thomas Sturge Moore, "To An Early Spring Day"]. Sorry that her aunt's recovery is not speedier. Will send a letter to her tomorrow. Does not like Mrs Costelloe 'in many ways', but does not condemn her for 'refusing to live with Costelloe' who seems to have been 'almost impossible to live with', though she should not have been 'taken in' by him; thinks her and [Bernard] Berenson's relationship is 'as nice as those sort of relations can be'; discusses her influence on him. Supposes he will see Miss D. G. [Lina Duff Gordon] at Florence; explains the nature of their friendship further. He and Lina are on 'very good terms' again, and she likes his poem about her pet bat ["The Lady's Bat"], though it is not yet finished.

Continues the letter next day; has read most of the editor's letter in the paper sent by Bessie's uncle [in a Dutch paper, to the Duke of Devonshire, see 9/26]; thinks he is 'in the main right' but knows 'little of the facts, except what he has gathered from English writers who disapprove of the [Second Boer] war' such as Bryce, Hobson, Lecky and Courtney; since he has 'ornamented his columns with many not very apt quotations' Bob as a poet ought not to be too hard on him. Thinks he will spend two days with Berenson at Florence, since it is unlikely Mrs Costelloe will be back; has not yet heard from his mother about crossing with Bessie and the letter may not have reached her. Asks him his plans suit Bessie. Is torn between Venus and Apollo, and 'Apollo has all the nine young ladies [the Muses] on his side'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Sets out his revised plans due to Bessie's aunt's continued illness again; 'very sad for her to be ill during the last few months [Bessie] will be with her', though the marriage could be put off if necessary. Even if the physical side of his feelings for her were not there, believes he would want to have her as a constant companion, which he cannot say even for 'his dearest friends such as Sanger and Fry and [Thomas Sturge] Moore'. Perhaps he should not separate these two aspects of his feelings; consideration of the way her personality seems to be 'always changing' slightly. Cuts off these 'lover's speculations', saying he should return to Mr Mudge [?]. Thinks that Mrs [Mary] Costelloe will not be back when he stays with [Bernard] Berenson, though he could not change his plans now, and does not want to have a breach with her. Has not done well with his play recently, but 'modified the plot somewhat' yesterday and thinks he will get on better now; will be able to read up on medieval manners and costumes on his return to England. Expects he will have to go to Welcombe even if Bessie does not come, and there is 'a fine French book on Medieval customs in the library'. Glad she was pleased by the beetle he sent her; likes 'little everything' as an endearment; knows the feeling that a dream is still real after waking. Hopes they have a nurse for her aunt now. Copies out his translation of the Swallow Song of Rhodes; it is not quite right yet and he needs a dictionary to check some of the words.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Apologises for not saying goodbye properly on the boat; hopes the stewardess looked after her, that she had a good crossing, and found everyone well at home. Asks her to thank Louisa [Hubrecht, who was staying with her uncle and aunt]. His hotel was very comfortable; had a good journey to London, reading more of "Arne" [by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson?]. Is glad to return to his 'studious habits', but even more so to think that soon she will share them with him. Has enjoyed his day at the British Museum. Had supper with the Sickerts and a 'long talk with Oswald', one of the 'nicest' of his friends whom he thinks she will like very much. Will probably go to Highgate to see [Thomas Sturge] Moore tomorrow, then to Dorking next day. Has not yet seen [Charles] Sanger, who must be out for the evening. Has been to Curry & Paxton, who will have them [spectacles for Ambro Hubrecht?] ready in about a week. Is paying Luzac [?]. Saw his parents this morning; his father has almost recovered. Read the Gospel of Nicodemus and some [Matteo?] Bandello stories at the British Museum. Expects she will soon be discussing their marriage date with her uncle and explaining his parents' plans to travel over. Will write to Sir Henry Howard [the British ambassador to the Netherlands] when the date is settled. Sanger has just been telling the story of his friend Robertson's love affair with an American girl who has just died; Sanger is going to Greece, and has not had 'his bad headaches' recently. Was sent a guinea by the "Manchester Guardian" [for his letter on the Amalfi landslip]. Frank Holland has sent a letter [17/145] promising him a set of Anatole France [as a wedding present]; Bob thinks what he has read of France 'very good'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

British Museum. - Encloses Luzac's receipt, which she may give to her uncle. Spent yesterday afternoon at Highgate listening to [Thomas Sturge] Moore's new poetry, which was 'very refreshing'; Moore liked his bat ["The Lady's Bat"], though suggested some alterations; did not show him his play but hopes to do so soon. Has just seen [Laurence] Binyon has shown him a 'new ode of Tristram and Iseult' ["Tristram's End"] which is 'quite good but perhaps not first class'. Is taking Moore's play "Mariamne" to Dorking to read again and hopes to be 'in train' to do something himself. Will not order the beds until nearer the time he goes to Holland, but will talk to [Roger] Fry about the bedroom; she shall see and approve the colour before he distempers the walls. Tends to agree with her that they should economise on furnishing, to leave 'a good margin' for things such as foreign travel; he still also wants her to have a new violin. Is dining this evening with [Charles] Sanger, [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson and [Desmond] MacCarthy; Sanger is 'not at all well'; hopes his Greek journey will put him right. Copies out some lines from Binyon's Tristram poem. Very glad that Bessie's aunt was so much better on her return; wonders if the Luzacs have called; the Sickerts know a Hague painter called [Dirk] Jansen, whom they like but do not care much for his painting.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegr[acht]; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thanks Bob for his letter. Is afraid her aunt is not as well as she first thought on her return. Has had several morning callers, including 'the old lady who used to have the snow in her head'. whose daughter would very much like to come and be their maid, and a little girl for whom Bessie once arranged a stay in the country when she was ill, bringing a wedding present she had made. The farmer from Leiden also came; her uncle is advising her to sell all her landed property before she becomes 'a foreigner' on her marriage, or she will have to pay a heavy tax to do so. Her husband has suggested that the money she gets for it should be invested in the house which her sister wants to buy. Asks if Bob has finished "Arne" [by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson?]; she has not, as she is finishing [Charlotte Bronte's] "Villette" which 'however silly & absurd in parts interests [her] immensely'. Had some bad dreams last night 'about bombs & suicides & fires in a great hall', after reading about the bombs and the fire at the Théatre Français in Paris, and the fire at the theatre in "Villette". Glad Bob saw [Thomas Sturge] Moore and had a good talk, and that he feels up to more work; he should tell her how he gets on and if her gets any more German done. Discussions of furniture and decoration for their house; asks Bob to send a sample of the green colour [Roger] Fry recommends for the drawing room. Thinks they must give up the idea of buying a new violin for the moment until she knows she can practise and get some lessons; she can always sell some shares if a valuable instrument becomes available as it would be a kind of investment, and probably more than their yearly allowance.

Her uncle and aunt have no objection to them marrying Whit week, and agree 'wonderfully' on most things about the wedding. She and Bob need two male witnesses of age settled in the Netherlands: she can have her uncle and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen and Bob can have Ambro [Hubrecht], but she cannot think of another near kinsman she would like to be present so they may need to ask [Abraham?] Bredius or another neutral. To the wedding breakfast, would like to invite on her side her uncle and aunt, the Grandmonts, Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht], all the Röntgens, the four Hubrechts [Ambro's family], Louise, and her eldest sister Marie. Asks whether any of Bob's friends would like to come, perhaps combining it with a 'little tour through Holland'. Has been cycling in the woods every afternoon, enjoying the sun but getting stiff legs; is reading a few pages of Bob's "Pilgrim's Progress" every night before going to sleep. Knows the painter [Dirk?] Jansen by name, a good teacher at the Hague Academy but she does not care for his paintings either. The Luzacs called to see her uncle and aunt when she was out; he seemed to like Bob. Likes the letter from Frank Holland which Bob sends and the present he is going to give them, as well as the lines by [Laurence] Binyon.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Hopes to decide today whether the second post reaches its destination at the same time as the first. Had a busy time in London, spending much time with Sanger before he left for Greece, as well as dining out, going to Fry's lecture, and to see "Richard II" with [Thomas Sturge?] Moore and Binyon. Returned on Wednesday and has done some work; saw Fry and they discussed Sanger's illness; he is 'desparately in love with someone who is behaving very cruelly to him [Dora Pease]' and he does not know what she feels for him. Will tell Bessie more when he sees her. Certainly good for him to go to Greece with Dickinson, Daniel, Wedd and Mayor. Saw them off at the station and 'felt desperately incline to go off with them'; they were so cheerful, even Sanger, and he has always dreamed of going to Greece, which they know so well; regrets that after his marriage he will not be able to go with them 'with who one can talk as freely as one chooses, as blasphemously, as obscenely, as wittily, as learnedly, as jovially as any of the old Greeks themselves did'. Feels he should have 'made hay more assiduously' during his bachelor days, instead of living 'mewed up' alone in the countryside. Knows Bessie will compensate him for all he is to lose; she must come to Greece before long or she will find him 'running off' without her. Praises "Richard II"; it was well acted, though he thought the Richard [Frank Benson?] "vulgar". Has written to his Aunt Meg [Price]; she seems happy to get them a 'cottage piano' which will later be exchanged; asks if Bessie wants the final choice of the instrument or whether she trusts his aunt's 'professional friend' to do this. Sophie is 'Miss Wickstead [sic: see 9/117]], not some young lady friend' he has not told her about.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Bessie should not mind her feeling [that a recent musical occasion would not have felt the same with Bob there]; he would not want her to be at [an Apostle's] Society discussion, as she would be 'a little out of her element', and he will likewise never be musically minded' however many concerts he go to; though he will want to 'know and try to sympathise with' her musical friends as she will 'to a far greater extent and more easily' with his friends. She is ''"Apostolic" in... intellect and Nature', though she cannot become a brother, whereas he could never be thought of as an 'Embryo' in music, however much trouble she took with him. However, does enjoy music, such as the Isaye [sic: Ysaÿe] concert last Monday, who played Schubert and Beethoven, and the song recital by [Blanche] Marchesi on Tuesday; she sang some melancholy songs by [Adolf] Jensen, and part of César Franck's "Ruth". Has been reading Heine's songs with a translation, and likes them, but not as much as those by Goethe, which seem as great, and in the same sort of way' as those by Shakespeare and Sappho. Mrs [Helen] Fry is still not well; has lent her 'lots of novels, which she reads very fast'; she sends Bessie her love. Still thinks the Lakes will be best for their honeymoon; asks advice on the trousers he should get for the wedding day. Lists some books he owns; Sophie [Wicksteed] is giving them a complete Carlyle; Bessie should keep any book that has meaning for her. The Insleys told him the correct spelling of his address was 'Westcot', but supposes he should follow modern fashion. Has read some more of the new poems [Thomas Sturge] Moore lent to Binyon; one 'about the dead Don Juan' is very original. Has not done much work recently; hopes to get the first two acts finished before going abroad. Is going to stay with the Holman Hunts before going to Cornwall; Hunt's 'painting is now no good' but he is charming and 'full of reminiscences of Rossetti, Millais and the rest'. Asks if she knows of the Dutch poet Piet Paaltjens. Read a poem of Heine in which he compared his wife to 'Schlangen' [snakes] and himself to Laocoon; wishes Bessie 'would come swimming over the sea, like the snakes in Virgil'. Fears he cannot get her [magic] carpet at 'Cardinal and Harvards; it is too oriental even for them'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinse[gracht], the Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Explains why she feels her days of 'pure musical enjoyment' are probably over and her feelings about this; knows he would like her to find musical interests in England, and she will try, but it is unlikely to be the same and she will have to go 'miles out of her way' to find it; would certainly like him to be there with her if she does find anything like the same milieu. Has had a kind letter from Bob's mother sending the programme for the concert; knows the Schubert quartet well; asks if Bob also heart the Beethoven serenade string trio. Very glad he feels he is understanding German more easily now; was disappointed when he declared on one of his first nights at Ede that nothing would every make him learn it, though he soon pleased her by offering to help Bramine to wash up the tea things. Her cold is gone: Emser pastilles are 'an excellent thing'. Has been having 'endless' conversations with her uncle about the wedding; this morning she was managing to keep her patience with his 'little objections and obstacles' but her aunt nearly lost hers. The conclusion is that Bob should write to the British consul at Rotterdam, Henry Turing, asking if he will be able to be present at the civil ceremony in the Stadhuis; he should send the letter through Sir Henry Howard, who has kindly written to Bob, and explain their plans to him; Thursday of Whit week is the best day. They should not ask the consul to be a witness, as her uncle wished, since then he would have to be invited to the breakfast and would be the only stranger there. Has been thinking about her wedding dress: looking at white silks, sketching out designs including a Watteau pleat as she loves these, and talking to her dressmaker. Funny that Bob has also been thinking about his clothes; would recommend high trousers and a frock coat, in a blueish rather than yellowish grey. Dutch men wear evening dress when they are married, but since Bob is an Englishman she thinks he should wear his frock coat. Asks whether it is in good condition; her aunt was saying yesterday that she was looking forward to seeing him 'well-dressed & in neat clothes... [for] the first time!'; tells him to bring some nice suits over too for other occasions. Haverschmidt, who wrote under the name of Piet Paaltjens, is the Dutch poet Bob asked about. Could not find the Heine song Bob tells her about; a Heine song she has copied out originally enclosed in turn. Went to an 'wonderful' concert last night by George Henschel and his wife [Lilian Bailey]; he sang the Schubert "Gruppe aus dem Tartarus", which [Thomas Sturge? or George?] Moore sang in Cambridge. Is very pleased with the silk she has chosen, which she describes. Tells Bob to enjoy himself at Holman Hunt's

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