Item 72 - Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Identity area

Reference code

TRER/9/72

Title

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Date(s)

  • 30 July 1899 (Creation)

Level of description

Item

Extent and medium

1 item

Context area

Archival history

Immediate source of acquisition or transfer

Content and structure area

Scope and content

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Blames the 'heat which brings on indolence' for his delay in replying to her last letter. Saw Madame Grandmont at the Bowmans', where he spent a very pleasant evening; she has since written to say he can visit in early September, so asks Bessie to tell her that will suit him very well. Is not going to Bayreuth, so will come straight out to Holland, which he is looking forward to seeing again. Has left the heat in the South of England and come up to 'the cool and airy atmosphere of Northumberland'. Is glad she likes the Odyssey; her translation is 'quite correct and scholarly', although a little too Biblical and free with 'withals' and 'verilys'. Agrees generally with what she says about [Henry] James: he need not always be so obscure, though 'vague ideas can often only be vaguely expressed'; discusses some of the characters and scenes he admires. Supposes she will be going to Denmark now; hopes she enjoys her music there; he has heard little for weeks and fears he will not until he goes to Holland. Is glad she enjoyed "Marrow and Asparagus" [his "Mallow and Asphodel"]; but she must like [Thomas Sturge] Moore's poems better, particularly "The Vinedresser", "The Panther", and "At Bethel"; the parts of Moore's poetry he likes 'mean more to [him] than anything that has appeared in England since Browning's early and great days". Will send for [Lagerlof's] "Antichrist Miracles" as is keen to see Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] 'glorified by fiction', even if she is depicted as 'a witch or Fiery, instead of the mild lady she really is'; has always intended to make her 'the subject of a romance' when he takes to writing novels in his old age. Bessie can keep [his father's] "American Revolution" until he comes. Asks to be remembered to the Grandmonts. His father has just bought a Madonna by [Francesco] Francia; they are all very pleased with it, though he is amused by the comments of the servants. The butler secretly prefers the not very good copy of Raphael's "Madonna della seggiola" which used to hang in the room; he says the 'lady' is pretty '(being good protestants, they won't call her the Madonna or the Virgin)', but the baby is 'rather a funny-shaped baby', and at least Raphael gave his child some clothing; says Mrs Prestwitch [sic: Mary Prestwich] (the old nurse, now housekeeper) knows more about babies than he does, and she is not sure about the baby; supposes neither he nor his brothers were 'exactly that type of infant' when they were in her nursery.

Appraisal, destruction and scheduling

Accruals

System of arrangement

Conditions of access and use area

Conditions governing access

Conditions governing reproduction

Language of material

Script of material

Language and script notes

Physical characteristics and technical requirements

Finding aids

Allied materials area

Existence and location of originals

Existence and location of copies

Related units of description

Related descriptions

Notes area

Alternative identifier(s)

Access points

Subject access points

Place access points

Genre access points

Description control area

Description identifier

Institution identifier

Rules and/or conventions used

Status

Level of detail

Dates of creation revision deletion

Language(s)

Script(s)

Sources

Accession area