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Binyon, Robert Laurence (1869-1943) poet and art historian
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Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to have news of Paul; the photograph of him touching Theodore's foot is 'delicious'. The new MP for Hexham, [Richard Durning] Holt and his wife, are staying at Wallington, as are: Aunt Annie [Philips]; Josephine Lawson; the younger Hugh Bell, in whom Sir George has 'discovered a great likeness to [Edward] Bowen' and thinks it 'extends to character'; and Sir Francis Blake. He and Caroline are 'much interested about [Laurence] Binyon'; wonders if [Sidney?] Colvin thinks he is 'breaching on Stephen Phillips's domain'. Glad Robert liked what he saw of [Macaulay's] "Marginal Notes", which Sir George has now typed up; Longmans are going to publish it.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

British Museum. - Encloses Luzac's receipt, which she may give to her uncle. Spent yesterday afternoon at Highgate listening to [Thomas Sturge] Moore's new poetry, which was 'very refreshing'; Moore liked his bat ["The Lady's Bat"], though suggested some alterations; did not show him his play but hopes to do so soon. Has just seen [Laurence] Binyon has shown him a 'new ode of Tristram and Iseult' ["Tristram's End"] which is 'quite good but perhaps not first class'. Is taking Moore's play "Mariamne" to Dorking to read again and hopes to be 'in train' to do something himself. Will not order the beds until nearer the time he goes to Holland, but will talk to [Roger] Fry about the bedroom; she shall see and approve the colour before he distempers the walls. Tends to agree with her that they should economise on furnishing, to leave 'a good margin' for things such as foreign travel; he still also wants her to have a new violin. Is dining this evening with [Charles] Sanger, [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson and [Desmond] MacCarthy; Sanger is 'not at all well'; hopes his Greek journey will put him right. Copies out some lines from Binyon's Tristram poem. Very glad that Bessie's aunt was so much better on her return; wonders if the Luzacs have called; the Sickerts know a Hague painter called [Dirk] Jansen, whom they like but do not care much for his painting.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Hopes to decide today whether the second post reaches its destination at the same time as the first. Had a busy time in London, spending much time with Sanger before he left for Greece, as well as dining out, going to Fry's lecture, and to see "Richard II" with [Thomas Sturge?] Moore and Binyon. Returned on Wednesday and has done some work; saw Fry and they discussed Sanger's illness; he is 'desparately in love with someone who is behaving very cruelly to him [Dora Pease]' and he does not know what she feels for him. Will tell Bessie more when he sees her. Certainly good for him to go to Greece with Dickinson, Daniel, Wedd and Mayor. Saw them off at the station and 'felt desperately incline to go off with them'; they were so cheerful, even Sanger, and he has always dreamed of going to Greece, which they know so well; regrets that after his marriage he will not be able to go with them 'with who one can talk as freely as one chooses, as blasphemously, as obscenely, as wittily, as learnedly, as jovially as any of the old Greeks themselves did'. Feels he should have 'made hay more assiduously' during his bachelor days, instead of living 'mewed up' alone in the countryside. Knows Bessie will compensate him for all he is to lose; she must come to Greece before long or she will find him 'running off' without her. Praises "Richard II"; it was well acted, though he thought the Richard [Frank Benson?] "vulgar". Has written to his Aunt Meg [Price]; she seems happy to get them a 'cottage piano' which will later be exchanged; asks if Bessie wants the final choice of the instrument or whether she trusts his aunt's 'professional friend' to do this. Sophie is 'Miss Wickstead [sic: see 9/117]], not some young lady friend' he has not told her about.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Expects Bob will soon return, but has sent a ring [for his engagement to Elizabeth van der Hoeven] to his hotel; thinks it very beautiful and appropriate. Has not found time to do Bob's house but will go over soon and give instructions for the study and friezes. The 'accursed [Second Boer] war is upsetting everything'; has only forty-two people signed up for his lectures, which start in a week. Helen says he is too pessimistic, but he does not see there is 'much room for people like us in a blatant jingo inflated nation'. Supposes that 'the most incompetent toady' gets to the top of the army just as at the National Gallery and the S[outh] Kensington [Museum]. Discusses Bob's poem, which he likes very much, though is not sure he gets 'this kind of medioeval business as well as [he does] classical'. Has been reading some of the Franciscan poets: Jacopone [da Todi] is 'stunning'; also praises [Saint] Bonaventura's meditations. Has found 'a new and splendid subject' for Bob in the Gospel of Nicodemus, which is 'terrible extravagant & Byzantine'; has told it to [Laurence] Binyon but does not expect he will use it before Bob returns.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst, Haslemere. - Little news: Helen is more or less the same, though he thinks her sisters' visits help and her brother is going to see her soon, and this stage might go on for some time. He and Goldie [Dickinson] are enjoying Roundhurst, though he has been up at the British Museum all the week. Saw Binyon: does not think the anthology ["Garland of New Poetry" (1899)?] will be good; it is mostly Miss Coleridge and a few others; thinks Binyon has closed the subscription list. Asks Trevelyan to tell Berenson he is working on the dating of pictures: mentions two works by Gentile [Bellini]. Augustus [Enticknap] has whooping cough. A separate sheet added as postscript encourages Trevelyan to write a simple letter to Helen with advice on what to put: thinks 'part of the depression comes from an idea that she has done wrong and people disapprove'. Thanks Trevelyan's mother: grapes would be welcome.

Letter from Thomas Sturge Moore to R. C. Trevelyan

The four volumes [of Bob's "Collected Works"] will 'completely dwarf' his own when together on the shelf. Asks if Bob has seen Douglas Bush's "Mythology and the Romantic tradition in English Poetry" ("Harvard Studies in English" Vol. 18), which he recently read at the British Library; it discusses the mythological poetry [Robert] Bridges], Bob, [Lascelles] Abercrombie, [Laurence] Binyon and Sturge Moore himself, concentrating on Bridges and Sturge Moore but 'treating us all seriously'. Heard about it from Frederick Gwynn, a pupil of Bush, who intends to write a book about Sturge Moore's poetry as his thesis ["Sturge Moore and the Life of Art", Richards Press ; University of Kansas Press, 1952] and hopes to spend next year in England. Gwynn will be one of the 'most careful readers' of Bob's "Collected Works". 'Education and Universities' do good at least in providing 'readers even for the unpopular' and students who 'appreciate other than fashionable qualities'. He and Marie will be 'proud' to own Bob's book.

The Countess [Karen] Blixen's "Out of Africa" has 'charming chapters'; her 'little Kikuyu protegé' believed Blixen could write a book as 'big and as hard as the Odyssey', but not that she could 'make it blue', like her copy of Homer; Bob's book would fulfil all points. Blixen does not write perfect English, but 'her psychology and style are both poetical and most interesting in unexpected ways'. Heard about the book from Binyon; it is a 'real delight, though unequal in places'. Met Julian and Ursula at the London Theatre Studio on Friday night: Julian is 'very charming and seems to have an "Out of Africa" touch not like a Giraffe but like some human equivalent' which the Countess may have 'discovered and appreciated', since she had a 'flair for the really valuable & rare'.

Letter from Laurence Binyon to R. C. Trevelyan

Westridge Farm House, Streatley, Berkshire. - His and Cicely's thanks for Bob's book ["Aftermath"]; commiserations on the loss of the stock of Bob's "Collected Poems" [in a bombing raid]; his own "Painting in the Far East" 'suffered the same fate", but this does not matter much as he does not think it would continue to sell. Has been told that authors whose stock has been destroyed by enemy action will be able to claim the royalties they would have received at the end of the war; not sure whether this is true and it is not particularly consoling. Praises "Aftermath"; knew some of the poems already but many are new. Shares Bob's feelings and admires his 'fortitude', though does not think reason is as 'sufficient a stand-by' to him as it is to Bob. Thinks he likes "A Custom of Thrace" best, but is not sure; mentions others he likes. Glad Bob is continuing to write.

He and Cicely were very worried about their daughter Helen at Bath [which suffered Blitz bombing over 25-27 April; Helen was working there in the Admiralty's mapmaking department], but received a message from her by telephone that she is safe, as is Riette [Sturge Moore]. Expects the Moores will have already heard their daughter is safe; supposes they are still staying with the Trevelyans. Expects Oxford and Cambridge will be next to be bombed, since he sees the 'Germans announce they will attack every building that has a star in Baedeker'. They have four grandchildren living with their mother at Oxford. He is 'struggling with the a poem, "The Ruins"' but is currently 'stuck'; it is 'intended to be a cluster of poems each in a way independent but related & forming a single poem'; sends the first section [no longer present]. Thinks Trevelyan manages his 'new kind of blank verse very well' and it seems to suit him, though Binyon was 'glad of' the rhymed pieces as a change. Does not like 'these easterly gales', but is happy to have 'so much sunshine'; their garden is 'rather lovely just now'. Sends love to the Trevelyans and the Moores.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Bessie should not mind her feeling [that a recent musical occasion would not have felt the same with Bob there]; he would not want her to be at [an Apostle's] Society discussion, as she would be 'a little out of her element', and he will likewise never be musically minded' however many concerts he go to; though he will want to 'know and try to sympathise with' her musical friends as she will 'to a far greater extent and more easily' with his friends. She is ''"Apostolic" in... intellect and Nature', though she cannot become a brother, whereas he could never be thought of as an 'Embryo' in music, however much trouble she took with him. However, does enjoy music, such as the Isaye [sic: Ysaÿe] concert last Monday, who played Schubert and Beethoven, and the song recital by [Blanche] Marchesi on Tuesday; she sang some melancholy songs by [Adolf] Jensen, and part of César Franck's "Ruth". Has been reading Heine's songs with a translation, and likes them, but not as much as those by Goethe, which seem as great, and in the same sort of way' as those by Shakespeare and Sappho. Mrs [Helen] Fry is still not well; has lent her 'lots of novels, which she reads very fast'; she sends Bessie her love. Still thinks the Lakes will be best for their honeymoon; asks advice on the trousers he should get for the wedding day. Lists some books he owns; Sophie [Wicksteed] is giving them a complete Carlyle; Bessie should keep any book that has meaning for her. The Insleys told him the correct spelling of his address was 'Westcot', but supposes he should follow modern fashion. Has read some more of the new poems [Thomas Sturge] Moore lent to Binyon; one 'about the dead Don Juan' is very original. Has not done much work recently; hopes to get the first two acts finished before going abroad. Is going to stay with the Holman Hunts before going to Cornwall; Hunt's 'painting is now no good' but he is charming and 'full of reminiscences of Rossetti, Millais and the rest'. Asks if she knows of the Dutch poet Piet Paaltjens. Read a poem of Heine in which he compared his wife to 'Schlangen' [snakes] and himself to Laocoon; wishes Bessie 'would come swimming over the sea, like the snakes in Virgil'. Fears he cannot get her [magic] carpet at 'Cardinal and Harvards; it is too oriental even for them'.

Letter from Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy to R. C. Trevelyan

21, Theatre Road, Calcutta. - Is having two books sent by the University to [Bernard] Berenson and [Laurence] Binyon. Is starting from Bombay on the 26 July by an Italian boat to Venice; will be in Paris by about 10 August. Would like to see his young people [Andrew and Bev Kalitinsky] in Zürich in their new home. His father is coming too and wishes to visit England to go to Harrogate and to see his cousin (whom Trevelyan once met with him in a Spanish restaurant) so Suhrawardy hopes to be in England soon after 20 August and to visit the Trevelyans before their holidays. Only important mistakes are to be mentioned in the errata list of his book ["Essays in Verse"], so as 'not to exhibit to the world the inefficiency of the [Cambridge] University Press'. Agrees it was very stupid of him to have put 'Sophoclean' instead of 'Euripidean' and hopes few people will notice. Has received a 'delightful letter' from Will Rothenstein praising the book; is glad he did not take Suhrawardy's 'ironical references to Jewish writers on the Continent' amiss.

Letter from Thomas Sturge Moore to R. C. Trevelyan

Congratulates Trevy [on his engagement] and wishes him 'all happiness'; on hearing about it beforehand from [Charles] Holmes and [Laurence] Binyon, who had heard through [Sydney] Cockerell and Trevy's cousins the Fletchers, he had 'refused to believe it' due to what Trevy had told him about 'Mrs Costello[e] having tried to put about such stories'. However, when his sister heard the same from Miss [Bonté?] Amos, who said she had got the news from Trevy's mother, he 'had to allow it might be true'. Thinks Trevy will 'make a good husband', but that he will 'spoil all [his] children with indulgence' and thinks he should start being 'very stern' with himself so that he is able to look 'cross' enough at them; knows he is talking 'as if the little Homers and Aeschylluses [sic] and a Sappho or two were bound to turn up' and hopes they will. Keen to meet Trevy's fiancé; hopes she is not 'too like George' and suggests that the only indication which Trevy has given as to what she is like ''is very misleading and puts one deeper into darkness than total ignorance'. Asks how long Trevy has know her, and if she is 'connected with the admirers of the Dutch Milton [Vondel?]' whom he met at Taormina. Is to get a hundred pounds for editing Shakespeare [for the Vale Press] and fears it will take up a lot of time, so cannot promise to write an epithalamium. [Roger] Fry is 'of course quite wrong about Bellini', whom Moore admires as much as Fry does, but denies that he is 'characterised by passion by pathos or by Virgillian [sic] melancholy'; Bellini is a 'far greater master than Altdorfer' though Fry seemed to think he was comparing them. Sorry that Trevy is troubling to copy out Moore's "Danaë"; he could easily have got two copies made; hopes he will 'suggest how the hard sentences can be made easy, & the crooked straight, at the same time as pointing out their deficiency'. Hopes Trevy's fiancée 'will prove a Muse... though she is not going to enter the lists as a rival'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Has talked to Mr Craile [?] about Trevelyan's book: the corrections were just in time and no more can be accepted. Binyon asks whether Trevelyan will contribute to an anthology he's preparing which is to include by himself, Bridges, Stephen Philips and others. Hopes that before Trevelyan goes north they will see each other again. Berenson was charming and he likes him 'increasingly'. Thanks Trevelyan for all he has done [during Helen Fry's illness].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Was tired after a busy day in London and a long journey home, but is rested morning. The shooting has gone well; three pheasants are being sent to Elizabeth and Robert today; Mrs [Hilda] Runciman came out shooting with her, and is staying with her husband here today. Sorry that Robert has to work indoors, but it will be good for him to acquire the habit if he can, as it will be harder for him to work outside in the damp as he gets older. Wonders whether [Thomas Sturge] Moore will publish soon, as he 'seems to have written several plays now'. There is a poem by [Laurence] Binyon in the 'new magazine'. Glad that [Alphonse] Grandmont and Elizabeth's aunt are 'progressing'; expects being in hospital with Madame Grandmont nearby will help her aunt. Asks for Madame Grandmont's address so that she can write. Is going next week to Welcombe, and will probably be in London from 19-21 November; would be good to see Elizabeth then as she will not go south till January. Elizabeth and Robert would be very welcome to spend Christmas with them, but expects they will have 'fled to the sun' before then. Wonders how Elizabeth will get on at [Margaret Price's house' Pen Moel. Would be very kind if Elizabeth could visit 'old Mrs Bostock', who is a 'kind old thing' though would bore her, and 'the daughter is not very charming'.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

47 Greenbank Road, Birkenhead. - Thanks Trevelyan for the proofs of “Sisyphus”, though he has not yet had time to read beyond the first few scenes, and for promising to send him the opera when it is bound. Sends a new poem. Has given up his novel, and is substantially reworking his play. Has taken up regular work on a “local newsrag” which is taking up much of his time, but novel-writing would be more of a drain. Has an idea for a book in three parts: “A Treatise on Love, in Several Doctrines and Examples in the form of Interludes”; sends the first completed piece. Is to be married in January. Asks how Tovey’s music is going, and when the operas will be given a hearing. Met Binyon recently and was surprised to find he did not like music and so looked askance on Trevelyan’s experiment, but otherwise found him charming. Is sorry to have kept Tovey’s analyses (which he greatly enjoyed) and the Moores so long.

Returns to the letter on 27 Nov and is greatly apologetic for not having returned the books and acknowledged the proofs. Has been very busy with newspaper work, but is also prone to procrastination. Praise of “Sisyphus”. Asks if Trevelyan has seen [? Esmé Cecil] Wingfield Stratford’s book, and whether he knows who the author of “Queen Marianne” and “Borgia” is [Michael Field, pseudonym of Katherine Bradley and Edith Cooper]. Sudden death of Abercrombie’s father in August. Asks if the “45” could be returned quite soon, as he would like to get it published.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

13, Hanover Terrace, Ladbroke Grove, W. - Very sorry that Bob has been 'having such a bad time with this disease', and is sending 'an inhaling apparatus which is an infallible preventative' [see 17/35]; hopes it will reach him in time. Has given the "Summons to the Soul" and the "Pitcher" exclusively to [J.C.] Squire for the "New Statesman"; has only his Po translations and cannot 'stain the pages of "Reconstruction" with such bilge'; would send anything he had gladly, and perhaps by next month will have some more Po Chu-I poems. His elder brother [Sigismund] is getting married on Tuesday 'with oriental pomp'; Hubert is at home with a cold, having a 'very good rest'. Saw Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] at the [1917?] Club on Tuesday, in 'great spirits'; also sees [Eric?] Maclagan sometimes, who is 'still rather washed out'. Asks Bob about a line of poetry, "And my young wife walks up the path alone", which he had thought came from the 'Chinese poems' in [Robert] Bridge's [anthology] "Spirit of Man". Has found a Li Po poem which he thinks is the original of the English line; it ends 'young wife alone mounts tower'.

Sees that [Laurence] Binyon has another volume of poetry out ["The New World: Poems"]; he is currently 'lecturing to soldiers in France on the Civilization of China', and Bob may see him in Paris. [Campbell] Dodgson, the Keeper of Prints [at the British Museum] has received an Order of the British Empire [CBE], but 'did not seem unduly elated'. Must be 'great fun being translated into French'; hopes 'Vildrac will soon get going' on him, and that 'poets are demobilized early in France'; 'Makers of "India rubber Medical appliances" came first on the list in England. Sir Auckland [Geddes] is evidently afraid of an undue increase in the birth-rate'. Sends his love to Francis [Birrell], and asks Bob to tell him Waley has lost his letter about where to get a 'copy of Foy [?]'. Wonders if [his translation of] the letter from Wang Wei to a friend could do for "Reconstruction" and encloses a copy [no longer present], but will not mind if it is no use. Thinks the "Summons" will be in the "New Statesman" and will send Bob a copy (possibly one for B.B. [Berenson] as well); will also send the second number of the Bulletin [of the School of Oriental and African Studies, in which further translations by Waley of Po Chu-'s works appear] when it comes out. Understands that [Thomas] Sturge Moore will continue to come to London [after a move to the countryside], and has organised 'a "poetry reading" for a proximate date'; would be 'harrowing if he were absolutely banished'. W.H. Davies has 'been in a tremendous flutter' due to sitting for a portrait by Augustus John; he has 'a passion for being painted by swells'; afraid that Davies' new poems are not selling well; does not think Fifield are good publishers.

Postcard from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

25 Wellington Square, S.W.3. - Is distressed to hear MacM [Macmillan] do not want to publish a selection of Trevelyan's poetry: this was not mentioned to him, and he will speak to them about it. Is not surprised that he is 'hurt & indignant'. Supposes they have lost a lot of money on Binyon and Sturge Moore's collected works. Emphasises that he knows Trevelyan has written well.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

British Museum, London: W.C.1. - Has not written before as he did not know where Bob was; but 'Mrs Riviere says Mrs Sickert says' Bob is near them, so he thinks this may well reach him [in Spain?]. The newspapers lead him to believe that Bob must be 'starving', but if he has flour 'there are all manner of amusing things' he could make. Binyon's adaptation of "Shakuntala" was acted at two matinées, but 'received rather gloomily'; he himself found it 'hopelessly boring', though Bateson and Ricketts were 'separately & independently enraptured'. [Alfred] Cortot has been performing a great deal; Waley now likes him less, and thinks it is only really the 'moderns' he plays well, while his performances of Beethoven, Chopin and so on are 'quite silly'; he will not play early music though he 'does it very well', but 'rams vulgarities like the worst sort of Liszt fireworks into his programs'. Forgot it 'infuriates' Bob when he talks about music. Expects Bessie and Julian are at the Shiffolds. Seems 'no prospect of Francis [Birrell] appearing in London' soon, which is 'very depressing'; hears that G Franklin has arrived, but 'not in this district, happily'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Lungarno Acciajuoli, Firenze. - Thanks Trevelyan for the trouble he has taken over Fry's book: though the book was badly published, he himself does not think Oldm[eadow] has acted guilefully. Describes a conversation he and Binyon had with Oldmeadow. The new edition is very good. This affair must not affect Trevelyan's friendship with Binyon. He and Helen have spent the afternoon in the Boboli [Gardens]; now must read Rumohr in German. Asks for news about the clavichord [made by Dolmetsch; decorated by Helen Fry]. Is glad Sidney Colvin thought well of his work.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Thanks Eddy for the 'welcome news' in his letter; sure it will cheer up Lascelles [Abercrombie], who has been better the last few days and should be able to go to Switzerland in a week or two. Eddy will receive the letter to [Laurence] Binyon for his signature soon; it 'got held up in its rounds once or twice' but should be on the way now.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Originally enclosing a copy of the petition for [Thomas] Sturge Moore. They have got [Gilbert] Murray to sign, and he thinks also [H.A.L.?] Fisher; they are trying to get [Arthur?] Balfour. Bob would like to get [Robert] Bridges, [Edmund] Gosse and [Thomas] Hardy; this copy would do for Gosse too if there is a chance of him signing. Thinks [Laurence] Binyon or [Henry] Newbolt is approaching Bridges. Thinks Eddie said [Siegfried] Sassoon knew Hardy well; has another copy of the petition if he thinks it is worthwhile asking Sassoon to try. They now have letters from [John] Masefield, [George Bernard] Shaw, Lascelles [Abercrombie], [John] Drinkwater and Gordon [Bottomley], and [William Butler] Yeats is sure to send one too. Sorry that he could not come to Eddie's prize-giving; it seems 'a very good choice'. Has told the Shoves to send Eddie Fredegond's latest poems. Sees that a number of Civil List Pensions have just been announce, and fears this may make it more difficult to get one for Sturge Moore.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Thanks Eddy for his letter. Binyon, whom Bob saw after seeing Eddy, 'gave the same advice as Squire and said he would do what he could to help Lascelles [Abercrombie] by writing to people in America' if required [re a lecture/reading tour?]; [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson would also help. Lascelles thinks it 'might be a good plan', but 'seems hardly anxious to make the experiment this year'; Bob does not see why he should not try this autumn, perhaps Eddy could talk to him about it if he sees him in town. Binyon doubts Lascelles would earn much the first time, but would 'be fairly sure to' the second. Would be best if something came up at home, but that cannot be counted on. Lascelles has 'got on better with his reviewing' the last few days, and 'seems more cheerful'. Eddy's Christmas presents to the children 'brought great joy'.

Letter from Laurence Binyon to R. C. Trevelyan

3 Tite Street, Chelsea. - Thanks Trevy for "Sisyphus", which he has 'read with the greatest pleasure'; praises the writing and the 'admirably married comedy & poetry', though he thinks it could perhaps be strengthened dramatically. Feels that 'wonderful things may be done in this vein', and hopes Trevy will 'develop it'. Adds a postscript saying that the appearance of the page 'looks as well as can be'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

22 Lungarno Acciajuoli, Florence. - Is glad Trevelyan is coming out to Italy: they must meet. Trevelyan must not be discouraged by his current difficulties. When B.B. and he were discussing Moore's book [Thomas Sturge Moore's "The Vinedresser and Other Poems"?], Berenson said he found 'far more poetry... and sense of beauty' in Trevelyan's. Has had letter from Binyon: hopes Trevelyan will see him before he comes abroad, as the 'whole business' [the quarrel over the publication of Fry's book on Bellini, see 4/28] must end soon. The 'Frullinites' are being 'chary': it's best to visit them rather than stay; has met Loeser whose personality makes Berenson's attitude understandable.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Is writing to Trevelyan instead of working on his lectures on the Byzantines. Has just read [Stephen] Philips "P&F" ["Paolo and Francesca"] and shares Trevelyan's conclusions: it is very English and there is no real poetry in it. Trevelyan, Binyon and Moore are far superior, but it is Philips whom the critics praise. Has had an irritating letter from Mrs Grandmont. Yes, Moretto was a Brescian. Describes the Frys' journey back from Italy. Has been to Westcott and thinks the house will do very well: will get to work with the friezes soon. Helen says they will be delighted to have Amica [Elizabeth van der Hoeven] any time in February; hopes he will have some time free from lecturing to show her around Dorking. His arch at the New English [Art Club] looks 'abominable'. Hopes Trevelyan and Berenson will sort things out. Sends love to Ravello.

Letter from Laurence Binyon to R. C. Trevelyan

Westridge Farm House, Streatley, Berks. - Sends 'rather belated' thanks for Bob's translations ["Translations from Horace, Juvenal and Montaigne, with Two Imaginary Conversations"] and for the "Epistle [to Joan Allen]" he sent to Binyon and [his wife] Cicely. Cicely has been suffering from erysipelas; it is a 'very debilitating disease', and he had to take her to stay with her brother [Valentine?]in Sussex; they returned last week. Congratulates Bob on the 'suppleness of the verse', just right for translating Horace; would have liked Bob to translate some of the "Odes", but expects he is right that it is 'quite impossible to repeat the miracles of placing [emphasised]' in an uninflected language like English. Much enjoyed the "Imaginary Conversations", and thinks them a 'pleasant way of writing literary criticism'; encourages Bob to do more, as he 'write[s] such excellent prose (like all good poets)'; asks if Bob feels he is 'trespassing on Landor'. Thinks he has succeeded in 'suffusing all the elements of the book... with a wholeness of atmosphere, wise and mellow'; enjoys this, though he cannot share in it completely, since he does not 'really feel at home in the Roman world', and has an 'obstinate streak of the mystic' which he is sure Bob would disapprove of. Had already given a copy of the book to his son-in-law [Humphrey HIggens], a teacher at St Paul's school, who has read some of the Horace with his pupils and 'much admired' Bob's translations. Only has one more canto of [Dante's] "Paradiso" to translate, but Macmillan has 'lost so heavily' on the first two volumes of the Divine Comedy that he is not keen to publish the last at the moment; however, he has agreed to publish a new book of Binyon's poetry "[The North Star"], which Binyon will send Bob when it come out, perhaps in spring. Knows Bob must mind not being able to take his usual trip to Italy; expect he has heard about their five months in Greece last year, which were 'very enjoyable and interesting', though Binyon would have found Athens a 'dull place' if he had not been so busy with his lectures and the weather was bad much of the time. They flew home all of the way. Supposes Bob hears nothing direct from B.B. [Bernard Berenson]; hears Mrs [Eugénie?] Strong has been 'turned out of her flat in Rome'. Asks how Bessie is; he and Cicely send their love to her, and to the [Sturge] Moores if they are still with the Trevelyans.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Monk's Walk Cottage, Much Marcle, Dymock, Gloucester. - Hopes to see Trevelyan in October. Thinks he may have been too hard on Leaf's version of Hafiz [see 1/33]. Thanks for ordering more copies of "Mary [and the Bramble]". Advises Trevelyan to try self-publishing: perhaps ["The Foolishness of] Solomon". Has not sent a copy to Moore or Binyon, but has to Bottomley, for whom he expresses his admiration. Is going to Bridges on 22 October; wishes Trevelyan could come too as it would make for "a better symposium on metre", and he dislikes staying with strangers. Asks if Trevelyan could loan him some of Bridges' longer work, and also his own "Attis".

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Asks Robert to look at the catalogue enclosed and share anything he knows about the Meryon and Whistler publications; Campbell Dodgson 'is a high authority'; Robert's friend [Laurence Binyon] might tell him something; cannot write to his 'particular friend' Kenyon about the books of a colleague. 'A Prince Conti of Volaterra' [sic: Piero Gineri Conti?] a 'very imposing and attractive Italian' was brought for a visit by Sir Charles Parson, and much struck by the Trevelyans’ Francia, which he recognised 'with real emotion as an Italian masterpiece'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegr[acht]; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thanks Bob for his letter. Is afraid her aunt is not as well as she first thought on her return. Has had several morning callers, including 'the old lady who used to have the snow in her head'. whose daughter would very much like to come and be their maid, and a little girl for whom Bessie once arranged a stay in the country when she was ill, bringing a wedding present she had made. The farmer from Leiden also came; her uncle is advising her to sell all her landed property before she becomes 'a foreigner' on her marriage, or she will have to pay a heavy tax to do so. Her husband has suggested that the money she gets for it should be invested in the house which her sister wants to buy. Asks if Bob has finished "Arne" [by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson?]; she has not, as she is finishing [Charlotte Bronte's] "Villette" which 'however silly & absurd in parts interests [her] immensely'. Had some bad dreams last night 'about bombs & suicides & fires in a great hall', after reading about the bombs and the fire at the Théatre Français in Paris, and the fire at the theatre in "Villette". Glad Bob saw [Thomas Sturge] Moore and had a good talk, and that he feels up to more work; he should tell her how he gets on and if her gets any more German done. Discussions of furniture and decoration for their house; asks Bob to send a sample of the green colour [Roger] Fry recommends for the drawing room. Thinks they must give up the idea of buying a new violin for the moment until she knows she can practise and get some lessons; she can always sell some shares if a valuable instrument becomes available as it would be a kind of investment, and probably more than their yearly allowance.

Her uncle and aunt have no objection to them marrying Whit week, and agree 'wonderfully' on most things about the wedding. She and Bob need two male witnesses of age settled in the Netherlands: she can have her uncle and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen and Bob can have Ambro [Hubrecht], but she cannot think of another near kinsman she would like to be present so they may need to ask [Abraham?] Bredius or another neutral. To the wedding breakfast, would like to invite on her side her uncle and aunt, the Grandmonts, Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht], all the Röntgens, the four Hubrechts [Ambro's family], Louise, and her eldest sister Marie. Asks whether any of Bob's friends would like to come, perhaps combining it with a 'little tour through Holland'. Has been cycling in the woods every afternoon, enjoying the sun but getting stiff legs; is reading a few pages of Bob's "Pilgrim's Progress" every night before going to sleep. Knows the painter [Dirk?] Jansen by name, a good teacher at the Hague Academy but she does not care for his paintings either. The Luzacs called to see her uncle and aunt when she was out; he seemed to like Bob. Likes the letter from Frank Holland which Bob sends and the present he is going to give them, as well as the lines by [Laurence] Binyon.

Letter from Thomas Sturge Moore to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hillcroft, Steep, Petersfield, Hants. - Thanks Bessie for her Dutch friend's letter; had already replied asking for five pounds a lecture plus expenses, as suggested by Binyon. They have sold the Steep house for £1400 and are now packing and preparing to return to Well Walk. They saw Julian on Sunday, but did not speak to him. They had a good letter from Dan who is on his second job, with a rise of 5 shillings a week. Is sorry Bob had to write; would have sent the Gracchi in a day or two. Marie says Bessie intended him to keep the letter from her friend, so he has done so.

Letter from Laurence Binyon to R. C. Trevelyan

Westridge Farm House, Streatley, Berks. - The Binyons are leaving for the Netherlands and Scandinavia tomorrow so he has had no time before now to write about Bob's Lucretius [translation of "De Rerum Natura". Congratulates him on what must have been a 'tough job'; thinks the blank verse is 'modulated with great variety', not becoming 'limp or stodgy', though he would 'prefer fewer disyllabic endings'. October's weather has been 'marvellous', and Bob's woods must be 'gorgeous now'. He and Cicely send love to Bessie; they hope the Trevelyans will be able to visit before long.

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