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Hubrecht, Paul François (1829-1902) lawyer and politician
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Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Pensione Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italy. - Glad to hear Uncle Paul is 'so much better', and that the doctor is happy with his progress; hopes that any further necessary treatment will 'not cause any serious pain' and be 'quite final'. When he and Bessie, they will hope to find him well on the way to 'complete health'. Bessie has been well despite the 'dreadful weather' they have had for almost a month. Very glad he saw the house in the Prinsegracht again [before its sale?] for a few hours last October, when dining with the Grandmonts after visiting Leiden: it is there that he and Bessie began their 'Vondel studies', and that he got to know Uncle Paul and Aunt Maria properly. Is getting on well with German, with some help from Bessie: has read all Goethe's "Tasso" and half his "Iphigenie", though he cannot yet speak the language 'at all'. Bessie is also doing well with her Latin: she 'has not yet mastered all the tenses of "amo"' [I love] but 'makes pretty fair guesses' at their meaning. A 'dreadful bore' has recently arrived at the hotel; he and Bessie take it in turns to sit next to him and 'share the burden equally'; thinks Bessie can 'manage him better'. He is a retired English army officer who served in India: 'like so many Indians' he is 'crammed full of information', which is often interesting but these people 'absolutely never cease pouring it out upon you'; however, he is 'by no means a fool'. Robert and Bessie are getting on well with "Robinson Crusoe"; the end of the last part is 'so exciting' that Robert has been taking 'plenty of time over shaving these last few mornings' while Bessie reads it aloud.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very wintry weather; they were 'almost snowed up for three days' and the station could only be reached across the fields. The Runcimans have been here since Saturday; they are 'very pleasant young people' and she thinks Elizabeth would like Hilda, who was at St. Andrews and Girton and 'is very energetic and intelligent'. There is a shoot today; Mr [William?] Watson-Armstrong has joined them. Expecting a party of Charles and George's friends after Christmas, and hope to have 'three cheerful days' before leaving for Welcombe.

Returns to the letter on the following day; does not have an address so will send this to Ravello. Glad to hear that Elizabeth has had 'plenty of music at Amsterdam'. Pleased that Elizabeth's uncle liked George's article ["The White Peril", in "The Nineteenth Century"]. George is 'rather distressed about it' and would have written it 'with much greater care' if he had known it would attract so much attention; she thinks though that it has been useful. Asks if Elizabeth's uncle will soon return home; supposes he will not go south but stay there quietly for the winter. Sir George has now read "Polyphem[us & Other Poems]" carefully and will soon write to Robert. Hopes they had a pleasant time with Mr [Bernard] Berenson; asks how 'the ménage' goes on. Sends regards to Madame Palumbo and Mrs Reid wants to hear all about the Pension now as they know it. Has been very busy with Christmas presents, but all have been sent now. They think 'L[ord] R[osebery]'s speech helpful to a Peace [to end the Second Boer War]'

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to get Elizabeth's card, as was slightly anxious about the crossing [to the Netherlands] they just escaped what seems to have been a terrible gale in the Channel on Thursday. Asks if she and Robert got her letters at the Langham; if not, Robert should write to the manager as she does not want the postal orders she sent him to be lost. Very glad Elizabeth's uncle is better and that she feels well herself. The book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] arrived yesterday; they think it 'very attractive & quaint'; Sir George will write to Robert about it. Thinks it should have some success. The title page and 'Swallow' [illustrations by Roger Fry] are very pretty; likes the poem "The [Lady's] Bat" particularly, though she does not think the picture such a success. Sends their regards to Elizabeth's uncle, cousin Marie, and all her family, and hopes she has a very happy week.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes all is well with Elizabeth and that they will soon be able to go on their travels as normal. Sir George was very pleased with their letters: it is a pleasure to help them, but 'nice to know [they] appreciate it'. Expects Robert's book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] in every post. George has 'made a sensation by his article ["The White Peril" in
"The Nineteenth Century" Vol. 50, Iss. 298, (Dec 1901): 1043-1055]'. Sir George is quite well again; they are taking drives and walking in the pleasant weather, and she superintends '"improvements"' and is preparing for Christmas. Hopes Elizabeth has good news of her uncle; asks if he will be at the Hague for Christmas. Is going to get Charlie to dress up as Father Christmas to give the school children their presents. Going to Welcombe on 3 or 4 January. Asks if Robert and Elizabeth have decided on Ravello or somewhere nearer.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Elizabeth is 'really improving & feeling in better spirits [after her operation]'; was sorry to hear from Booa [Mary Prestwich] that she was not better on Thursday and Friday. Tiresome that she has to stay at the [nursing] home, but it is good that she is getting through this first spell under medical care. Very good of Miss Martin to offer to visit her or travel down with her [to Surrey] to help her through 'the first tiring days'; was very sorry to leave her. Had visit on Friday from Dr [Henry Palin] Gurney, head of the Durham College of Science, and his wife, who are 'nice cultivated people', as well as the 'Middletons [Sir Arthur Middleton and/or his children ?] & the Blackett-Ordes [sic] from Rothbury'; they did not leave until nearly lunchtime on Saturday, after which she and Sir George 'took a quiet walk and settled down a little'. Has to 'superintend a mild [?] lecture in the village' tomorrow afternoon, then is going to Newcastle on Tuesday to preside at the 1st of a series of lectures on Industrial matters' got up by Mrs [Hilda] Runciman. Charlie is at home till Tuesday, and then will go off again 'shooting & speaking'. Sends love to Bob; hopes to see the book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] soon. The destruction of trees in the storm 'very sad'; they lost about eight 'just before the portico walk', and about ten firs by the bridge, as well as single ones. The wrecks on the nearby coast were 'most sad & terrible'. A postscript adds that she hopes the news from Utrecht [of Elizabeth's uncle] is good and is sorry about the Queen [the miscarriage suffered by Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands?].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Elizabeth's visit to Holland [owing to her uncle's ill health] "ended in pleasure instead of sorrow"; has heard that she has visited Gr[osvenor] C[rescen]t. Arrangements for Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s and her own visits to the [nursing] Home to see Elizabeth. They have guests tomorrow for the shooting on Thursday and Friday: the A. Elliots, Lord Ridley, and Miss [Lily?] Noble; Charlie also came home for a week last night. Sir George was very pleased to get Robert's letter; supposes he will stay in London to be near Elizabeth; originally encloses a note from Miss Martin.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very pleased that Elizabeth's uncle is better; hopes the improvement will continue and that he is not in too much pain. She was right to go to him at once. If she does return and go to the Home [for medical treatment] on the 29th, Booa [Mary Prestwich] can come up on 2 November and Caroline herself will be in town on the 4th; Booa can stay as long as Elizabeth likes, and Miss Martin will be 'delighted' to visit, as she is not far from the Home, so Elizabeth will not feel 'quite deserted' before Booa comes. If Elizabeth decides to put it off, thinks Booa could come any time before Christmas; advises her to 'get it over' if she is no longer so anxious about her uncle. Supposes she would not like to have it done in Holland, where her sister could be near her as 'they have all had so much illness to look after' and Robert will want to return to oversee the book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"]. Sir George sends his love.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Received Elizabeth's postcard last night; they are very sorry; hopes she found her uncle alive and able to know her; she should tell Robert to write to them. Hopes she had some warm winter clothes for the night journey. Asks to be remembered to all Elizabeth's family; supposes her uncle was taken ill at Utrecht. She and Sir George are currently alone; he is well but 'beginning to want a break'; they will be in the south early November.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very sorry to hear the bad news about Elizabeth's uncle; thinks she is right to put off going to London [for medical treatment] as she may want to go to the Hague; 'so hard to think of parting with ones dear old ones' though it 'comes to us all'; agrees it is best that Elizabeth's aunt was 'spared this'. Booa [Mary Prestwich] will not travel to London, and Elizabeth should let them know what she decides; sure Robert will do all he can to comfort her. Asks her to send their sympathies to Madame Grammont [sic: Grandmont: Bramine Hubrecht]. A postscript notes that Booa can come any time before 29th October.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Originally enclosing a note from Dolmetsch; hopes Elizabeth will agree to play with him; she 'can join him in the Purcell' and perhaps play something 'after his program is finished'. Asks her to write direct to him and say if she can 'undertake the Sonata'. Hopes she will have a good evening with the Daveys [sic: Llewelyn Davies family?]. Going to Welcombe on Thursday. Would like to visit for lunch if Elizabeth and Robert are at home in the week of 17 June; Sir George says he wants to very much, and they are visiting Aunt Margaret [Holland] at Witley then. Aunt Annie [Philips] was here yesterday, and discussed arranging a visit to her by Elizabeth and Robert. Caroline hopes they will spend a fortnight at Wallington; would be best if Robert could come for the shooting. Annie is coming on 15 August for a week, and has Aunt Meg [Price] staying with her until the 12th. Hopes there is good news from the Hague [of Elizabeth's uncle]. A postscript says Elizabeth may stay the night on the 12th.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to hear good news about Elizabeth's uncle. Pantlin is ready for Elizabeth to try on the dress; she will have to come on Saturday rather than Monday if she wants it finished before they leave on Thursday. Has written to Dolmetsch about a concert but not yet received a reply; asks whether he is in London at Charlotte Street. Is going to see George at Cambridge today.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Very sorry to hear the news about Elizabeth's uncle; hopes this new anxiety will not last long; reassures her about the success of modern operations. Sorry the boy [Augustus Enticknap] has measles; it is 'a light illness at this time of year'. Elizabeth must be careful about infections, and 'not let other people be exposed to it without their knowledge': the Frys should not come to the house while 'Mrs E. is going about her work freely'. Asks when Elizabeth will come up; thought the dress 'very pretty'; Pantlin should be ready for another fitting at the end of the month. A postscript tells her to ask Robert whether he 'remembers giving the measles to Arnold's boys'

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Hopes Uncle Paul has the 'same delightful weather' as they do: it is 'almost too hot'. Bessie is well except for a 'cold in her throat'. Hopes Uncle Paul's rheumatism has gone. Their 'Dutch bulbs' are doing well: the hyacinths are 'splendid', and though Bessie thinks she planted the tulips too deeply, the flowers are 'very good'. The crocuses were over when they came [back from Italy]. The birds are singing: he heard 'several nightingales yesterday'. Roger and Helen Fry's son Julian is a 'very healthy looking young man, and his parents seem very happy with him'; though his 'chin and lower jaw are small and undeveloped', Bessie says that is often the case with babies, and 'Johannes Röntgen used to be even worse'. Roger and Helen Fry seem 'quite well now'. Has been reading the Hans Andersen which Uncle Paul and Aunt Maria gave him alongside a German version and thinks he will 'get on quite fast' with his German. They have put the photograph of Aunt Maria which Bessie brought back on the mantelpiece of the library, where they sit in the evening; it is the one from a couple of years ago, which resembles 'Bramine's last picture' of her; he likes having it there as it reminds him of her as he 'first knew her'. However, she did not change much for him even after she became very ill; even last winter [just before her death], her 'cheerful and kind face and expression' were 'essentially the same'. Hopes Tuttie is well. They much enjoyed their recent stay at the Hague, and were 'made very comfortable' and looked after well by Tuttie.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad the long journey went well; is sure Elizabeth's uncle and Marie are glad to have her and Robert with them for a while; hopes they will 'leave them in better spirits'. Understands how sad it must be to find her aunt's place empty. They are glad to be back; Sir George is eager to return to work and starts tomorrow; she is 'in a confusion of letters, accounts, intervoews, & general arrangeing [sic]'. Charles and George are leaving tomorrow, 'to the West of England, & to the Appenines to walk'. If Robert 'goes off', Elizabeth must come and spend the day with Caroline; they can put her up for the night if she wants. Hopes she will find the Enticknaps and the house all right. Elizabeth and Robert have missed the census, which she and Sir George 'just came in for'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Firenze. - The news of the death of Elizabeth's aunt in Robert's letter was a shock, though they knew how ill she had been for some time. Knows how much her aunt meant to her, since she had always lived with her and 'received a mother's care from her'. Glad Robert is there to comfort her; her recent visit, when her aunt was a little better, was very well-timed. Very sorry for Elizabeth's uncle. Glad to have met her aunt, and will 'always remember her kind sweet face, and refined charming manners'; regrets that they could not talk freely since speaking made her cough. Hopes to see Elizabeth and Robert at Naples, as she does not think Elizabeth's family will ask her to cut short her time in Italy since she can go to the Hague on her return. Good that her aunt 'did not linger very long & painfully after the illness was hopeless'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan to Maria Pruys van der Hoeven

Robert addresses Aunt Maria as 'Mijn beste tanteke' then continues the letter in English'; wishes her happy birthday and hopes she feels well despite the cold, which must be much greater there than he and Bessie have; it has been 'much warmer' [in Ravello] for the last couple of days, though not enough yet for the butterflies, lizards and crocuses to come out as they usually do all winter here. They are alone at the hotel except for a 'funny old gentleman' who is 'rather dull, though quite nice' and wears formal dress clothes for dinner even when alone. They have visited Mrs Reid and her friend Miss Allen, whom they like very much, and in whose garden they spend much of their time. Describes drinking half a bottle of Episcopio Spumante with Bessie yesterday evening (the hotel is the 'original bishop's palace... so the wine made at the hotel is called Episcopio') which led them into a conversation with the 'tedious old gentleman'; when they 'retired in some confusion' to their room he jokingly says they left the old man with the sense he had been with 'two persons of great mental powers'. They 'composed' themselves 'by reading some very serious moral poetry' and remembered that they had sent some of the same wine to Alphonse Grandmont last year which 'made a somewhat similar impression on his sober household'. Bessie says that she will take her thimble to measure out the wine this evening. Hopes that Uncle Paul and Tuttie [Hubrecht] are well; asks her to send them his love.

Bessie then writes two pages to her aunt, in Dutch; gives an account of their days, including her studies of Macaulay's "History of England", their walks; the other guest Mr Kershaw always sitting in the dining room. Asks her aunt to thank her uncle for [?]. Was very happy to hear that Julius [Röntgen] had had success in the Ceciliaconcert; [her sister] Mien must be happy.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Hubrecht for the copies of the marriage deed and inventory. Much relieved to hear that Madame Hubrecht is recovering though could wish she were doing so more quickly. Sorry not to have been in London during Hubrecht's grandson [Jan Bastiaan]'s visit; glad he will see Cambridge, 'which he is so fitted to appreciate'.

Incomplete letter from Elizabeth Trevelyan and R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Beginning of letter missing; text starts mid sentence with Bessie referring in Dutch to financial matters and thanking her uncle. Asks if Bramine will come tomorrow [for Uncle Paul's birthday], which will be very cosy; hopes their own 'little flower' will be delivered tomorrow. Robert wants to say something now so she will let the 'eloquent poet' speak for himself.

Robert adds a note in English, though he first addressed Paul Hubrecht as 'Mijn beste Ooom'; wishes him 'every happiness' for his birthday, and wishes he could be there. Hopes that if there are speeches, 'the oratory may reach as high last year, when the dinner was made so pleasant by brilliant flashes of humour from you and Paul and Ambro' and his own 'brilliant flash of silence', which perhaps should be called his '"break-down"'. He and Bessie hope to be with the Hubrechts before Christmas; also that Jan might be able to pay them a short visit, and perhaps also visit Robert's brother George at Cambridge. Hopes that by the time they come to the Netherlands. Aunt [Maria] and [Alphonse] Grandmont will be 'much better'; they both seem to be improving, though slowly. Must be a 'great relief that Tuttie is quite well again'. Bessie has been well except for a 'nasty cough', but this is nearly gone now. They recently went to Cambridge and saw Aeschylus's "Agamemnon" acted [the Cambridge Greek Play], though they thought it was not done so 'with great success'; Bessie's 'musical conscience was offended by the badness of the chorus music'. Was kind of Uncle Paul to send 'that prophetic Strand Magazine', which Bessie says she got 'as early as '92': her 'unconscious prophetic instinct must have been working even in her schooldays'. They find their "Encyclopaedia Britannica" a 'great recourse': they will be 'very omniscient' by the time they next see Uncle Paul, particularly Bessie, though she says the article on Dutch literature is 'poor'. Perhaps this is because it 'does not do justice to the great 17th century poet [van den Vondel?], whose works form so brilliant an adornment to their bookshelves'. Best wishes to Aunt Maria and Tuttie; hopes that tomorrow [Uncle Paul's birthday?] will be a 'happy day'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - He and his wife are very anxious about Madame Hubrecht's health, about which Elizabeth gives them regular news. The young couple seen 'exceedingly happy in their home', having spent part of the summer at Wallington. In January he and his wife are going to Sicily, then to Rome, returning to England at Easter as they feel they should have 'two or three months in London as a sort of duty'. The General Election was 'disastrous to the Liberal party' and he thinks 'not creditable to the country or the Government'. Asks to be remembered to Hubrecht's wife and daughter [Marie?], and son [Ambrosius] when he next sees him.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Maria Pruys van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Glad to hear Aunt Maria is generally better; hopes her health will continue to improve. Also glad that [Alphonse] Grandmont and Jan [Hubrecht] are recovering, and that Tuttie [Hubrecht] has 'come back so much stronger'. Thinks about Grandmont every morning when they eat his 'black-butter' at breakfast; they wonder why it is black since it comes from the 'juice of white apples'. Bessie is well, despite the bad weather; there has been much wind and rain and 'her violin strings squeak, for all that she can do'. She is going to have her second lesson with [Johann] Kruse next week, who was unfortunately away when they last went to London. Two of his friends, both poets, visited on Sunday; one of them [Thomas Sturge] Moore read a play yesterday ["Omphale and Heracles'; they thought it 'very good' and wished it could be put on, but 'they do not act good plays in England now, except Shakespeare, and that they usually do badly'; the actors too are 'bad'. Bessie thinks English coal fires create much 'dust and dirt even when they do not smoke badly'; admits they do in comparison to Dutch stoves, but he does like open fires; whoever invented a fireplace combining the advantages of the two styles would be a 'great benefactor to man'. Spent three 'very full days in Paris with the same two friends' [at the Paris Exhibition]; might have wished Bessie to be there too but she would not have enjoyed the 'fearful'' crowds; even they got tired. Thought the 'old French art... very fine'; the 'side-shows and sights at the Exhibition were very poor' and the 'buildings too florid and ornamental, and some of them hideous', but the 'general effect... was very splendid and brilliant'. Is interested in the Queen [Wilhelmina of the Netherlands]' marriage, and glad 'the Dutch are pleased'; Bessie was 'quite sympathetic' when [Duke Henry of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, the Queen's betrothed] 'had to say good-bye to her and go away to his country for a time] [as Robert had had to during their own courtship]. They have got an 'illustrated paper' about the royal couple. Next week, they are going to visit his aunt, Mrs Price, who gave them the piano, at her house in the Welsh borders; he has not been there since he was a boy, so is curious to see the place again. Bessie will write soon, but there is no time now as this has to catch the post; she sends love to all.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to hear Elizabeth has been 'well & cheerful & busy' and that George has been to visit; will see him on Tuesday and hear what he thinks of the Mill House. Sorry she missed a music lesson, but glad [Johann] Kruse has not 'gone abroad altogether' and that she will have another soon. Hopes Robert is getting on well with his work and will be ready for another holiday when they go to Pen Moel [home of Caroline's sister Margaret]. Charlie has been here again this week; next week is the pheasant shooting. Has to go to London next week, 'rather a horrid long journey for one day' and must go to Welcombe the week after as she and Sir George have 'quite decided to go abroad'. Wonders how Elizabeth will get on with Miggy [Price], who is 'very excitable sometimes' and talks so much she finds her 'very tiring'. Glad Elizabeth's aunt got through her journey to Holland; hopes the treatment at Utrecht will help; supposes Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht] will be able to look after her as well as her own husband; Elizabeth's uncle will be lonely. Charlie was pasting the wedding photographs into a book last night; 'sad to think how much illness there has been since in the group'. Asks if Mrs [Helen] Fry is keeping well; hopes 'the lantern arrived for the 2nd lecture [by Roger Fry?].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan to Maria Pruys van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Robert is glad Aunt Maria is 'on the whole better' and hopes she will continue to improve; Bessie much enjoyed getting her letter. Expects Tuttie [Hubrecht] will be with her soon., but it is 'very sad about the Grandmonts', and they hope all will soon turn out well. They have just had their first guest: Robert's Aunt Annie [Philips] who 'gave Bessie the broach [sic]', his mother's sister. She came for lunch and tea; Bessie was 'very busy' in the morning making things nice as Aunt Annie is a 'very skilful connoisseur in housekeeping'. Now Bessie is sewing rings onto the curtains for the dining room; Robert breaks off to go and look at them, and reports they look 'even better than expected...' though the seamstress has made them two inches too short. Wishes Aunt Maria could see their house; will soon send photographs of the exterior and two sitting rooms, but this will not give her a real idea; she will however see the Enticknaps and their son Gussie. Is about to put some weedkiller on the lawn, though this is an unending task. Their French roses are 'still blooming' and have been very successful. There are now frosts at night, though the weather is still 'beautiful'. Has recently been reading, with the help of translations, the old Provençal poets; some are much more beautiful than he expected, and he understands now why Dante so admired and was influenced by them; however many of the Troubadours are 'very dull and conventional'. He and Bessie read some of Dante's "Paradiso" together most mornings; they like it very much and persevere even though it is 'very difficult'. They both send best wishes to her and Uncle [Paul Hubrecht], whom he hopes is keeping well.

Bessie adds a postscript in Dutch at the bottom of the last page which she continues above Robert's writing on the first page; asks about Tuttie, describes getting the house ready for Aunt Annie. Asks about a name, 'Lucy Bane?', which she could not read. She forgot Johannes [Röntgen?]'s birthday; Aunt Maria 'thinks much more intensely about other people, just like Grandmother did'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Maria Pruys van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Apologises for not writing sooner; never managed to write when he had so much spare time at Wallington, and now he has returned and begun work 'can easily find time'. Bessie may not yet think the house perfect, but it is 'already far more beautiful and comfortable' than he ever thought a house of his could be; she gets on very well with the housekeeper [Mrs Enticknap] and he can hear them talking at the moment; sometimes after they have had long talks there are 'such wonderful vegetables for dinner, cooked in some delightful out-landish fashions'. Even the vegetables at Wallington improved, 'especially the carrots and peas'. Bessie has been translating her "Nederlandsch Volksliederenboek" for him; some are very pretty, and he would one day like to translate them himself; he has not yet translated [Joost van den] Vondel. Hopes she, her husband, and the others will like [Thomas Love] Peacock's stories; some of the allusions to 'contemporary literary or political ideas which are now almost forgotten' may be difficult, but he thinks they will find them amusing; rememberes that the best are "Headlong Hall", "Nightmare Abbey" about Shelley, and perhaps "Maid Marian". Bessie has sent Bramine "Emma" by Jane Austen; sure she would also like that. Sorry she is not quite well, and hopes she will recover before winter. Very sad that Tuttie [Marie Hubrecht] is so unwell; hopes she will be able to get to Switzerland soon. Glad that the Grandmonts may build a house in the country; remembers the country by Doorn as being very pretty. He and Bessie went to Haslemere last Friday to visit the Joachims and some other friends and enjoyed it very much; was his first meeting with 'old Mr [Joseph] Joachim'; went for a walk with young Harold and visited his 'old haunts' like his old house Roundhurst, while Bessie stayed at home and talked. Hears that Bramine is painting Maria's portrait in the lace dress she wore at Elizabeth and Robert's wedding, which he so much liked; asks to be remembered to the family. Herbert Jones is getting married tomorrow, and they will send a telegram.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Originally enclosing the 'attested copies of the two documents' [relating to a settlement and covenant made on Robert and Elizabeth Trevelyan's marriage]; the stamp duties have now been paid. They have had happy letters from the young people, and are much looking forward to their visit this summer. His wife has had a letter from Miss [Marie] Hubrecht, and is glad to hear Madame Hubrecht's health is improved. He is hard at work and they are leading a 'quiet, rustic life'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Seatoller, Keswick, Borrowdale. - Is sending a cheque for six pounds thirteen shillings [for wedding expenses], which added to the ten he has already paid is not too much 'considering the happiness which [he] could not have attained without paying it'; would have been ready to pay 'sixteen millions... if [he] had had them'. They have had a 'very pleasant time here' [on honeymoon]; though the weather has been quite bad it is now 'perfect'. Went out for a while with the 'hounds' [on the Lake Man Hunt] and saw his brother George caught in a deep valley 'two thousand feet' below his own position; chased another hare himself though he could not catch him. Bessie would have liked to come but she has been in the Netherlands too recently 'for her legs to be well enough used to these high hills', though she is 'climbing the lower one quite well now, and the mountain air has done her a lot of good'. They are going to Grasmere on Saturday but Bessie thinks it best for letters to them to be sent to the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking to be forwarded on. Will be back in Dorking by the end of next week. Very glad to hear Aunt Maria is better; sure the countryside will do her good; hopes Uncle Paul himself is keeping well. Bessie meant to write a letter which would arrive last Monday, the 'fiftieth anniversary of [Paul's] Doctor's Degree' but presumably as she has 'so many other pleasant things to think of' she forgot and only remembered today. Asks to be remembered to anyone at the Prinsegracht [the Hubrechts' home] though he supposes only Tuttie will be there.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - He and his wife had a good crossing after Hubrecht kindly saw them off, and return with 'pleasant recollections' of the 'kindness and cordiality' they met with in Holland. They hope that Hubrecht's wife has not suffered from 'all the movement, and the trial to her feelings'. Asks to be remembered to Hubrecht's daughter [Marie] and to the Comte and Comtess de Grammont [? Alphonse Grandmont and his wife Bramine Hubrecht?] if they are still there. Asked his lawyer today to get certified copies of the two documents [relating to a settlement and covenant made on Robert and Elizabeth Trevelyan's marriage], which is 'quite a recognised proceeding'; will take some time, as the documents must be stamped by the Inland Revenue. The 'filling up of the blank is a trifle'; explains that this clause is in Robert's favour rather than their own.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W.. - Hopes Elizabeth has 'arrived safely'; sure she will be glad to spend a few quiet days at Haslemere. The Trevelyans found Elizabeth's aunt downstairs and looking a little better on their final visit; Mr Hubrecht kindly came to see them off. Found 'C & R' [sic: Charles and George?] had crossed comfortably the night before and were breakfasting here when they arrived. Many parcels here for Robert, including things from Miss Martin and Miss Richardson.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht and Maria Pruys van der Hoeven

Hôtel de la Poste , 30-32 Rue Fossé-aux-Loups, Bruxelles. - Is sending this 'short note' along with Bessie's letter. Everything has gone very well so far; though Bessie is still rather tired, she has been less so than he expected. They start their journey again this evening. They had a quiet morning, just spending a couple of hours at the Gallery; Bessie has slept a little this afternoon and he therefor hopes she will be all right after the journey. Hopes Aunt [Maria] is no worse for yesterday [Robert and Bessie's wedding day]; is 'anxious to hear how she is'; for the newly-weds, 'the day went off in the most completely satisfactory manner'. Even though he is himself 'no lover of ceremonial days', as they know, he enjoyed it all and could see others did too; thanks them for their 'splendid foresight and arrangement'. Robert and Bessie saw Paul and Jan [Hubrecht] and Robert's brothers at the station. Bessie is a 'very good travel-companion, even when she is tired'; is sure she will also be a 'very good travel-companion through life'. Forgot to ask them about the ten guilders they gave him 'for the poor'; supposes it ought to go into his account with them and be paid out of the ten pounds. Thinks Bessie is writing about a box she may have left behind; they were wise to advise him to count the luggage, but fortunately it is not important. Hopes his mother was able to see Aunt Maria today; is sure she and his father have 'enjoyed their visit enormously'. Sends love to the Grandmonts and Tuttie [Hubrecht]. He and Bessie are going out soon for dinner at 'some neighbouring tavern'; it is 'dangerous to take Bessie into these streets', as she stops to look at the lace and 'other feminine vanities for which this town is so famous' in every other shop. A note in Bessie's hand here says that she now sees 'how dangerous it is to be married to a poet with such fantastic imagination & - exaggeration!'. Sends love to them both, and wishes them as much happiness as he and Bessie feel, 'which is saying a great deal'.

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