Showing 1134 results

Archival description
Trevelyan, Caroline (c 1847-1928) wife of Sir George Otto Trevelyan, 2nd Baronet
Print preview View:

Letter from G.O. Trevelyan to Nora Sidgwick

Acknowledges receipt of the proofs of Henry Sidgwick: a Memoir. Claims that he began reading it at four o'clock that morning and read to the end of 1884. Declares that the account of Henry's work at Cambridge raised him greatly in his [Trevelyan's] esteem and admiration, and remarks on how little Henry said about his labours and self-sacrifices. Refers favourably to the 'Journal letters' also. Hopes that she will insert Henry's letter to Trevelyan of 29 May 1905 [sic], which, he claims, is 'one of the most touching and beautiful things in the world.' Gives her permission to show it to Arthur Sidgwick. Sends his wife's best love, and looks forward to Nora's visit.

Trevelyan, Sir George Otto (1838-1928) 2nd Baronet, statesman and historian

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that were it not for the fact that he is to go to her in October, she would be very sorry to say that she cannot receive him that month. Reports that she was at Stone G[appe] a week previously, and was going again to the Chancery, when she heard from William of their sudden move to Guernsey, so she hastened home. States that the 'whole party' seemed in good spirits, and hopes to hear the following day of their arrival in Guernsey. Refers to Henry's attitude towards the move, and to William's return to Oxford, which had proved to be a disappointment. Announces that she is going to see Minnie the following Monday, and will see Martin and Arthur before they go to school. Declares that the loss of 'the Crescent Villa family' is great, and hopes that the move may bring some greater good to William. Asks Henry to write to tell her when he is going to visit in October. Adds that William was anxious to know from Henry the day of the Ad Eundem, and whether he [Henry] could go to Oxford. Suggests that she could ask Mr and Mrs Trevelyan. Offers him lodgings on 20 September in Oxford, if he has 'any difficulty about a bed' and doesn't mind the distance from Lincoln College, and states that Mary could make him very comfortable there.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Encloses 'the only letter which is come' that morning [not included], and describes the printed circulars which arrived: a notice of a half-yearly general meeting of the Pro[ ]s of the Scottish Australian Investment Company, and a notice of Henry having been made a member of the London Library. Also encloses a letter from Miss Clough [not included].

Claims that they 'scarcely feel afraid now of the war which appeared to some imminent' the previous day, and states that '[a]s Prince Leopold's Papa won't let him accept the Spanish Throne surely France can find no other pretext for such wanton bloodshed.' Refers to the weather in Rugby.

Reports that she has as yet had no letter from William, and states that she doesn't think that Arthur is strong, and that Dr [George?] Burrows advises against his playing certain games, such a croquet. Remarks that he must be careful if he goes to Switzerland. Reports that Mrs Trevelyan is unable to come to Rugby due to the heat, and 'is obliged to go to the sea with Lady Trevelyan.' Adds that Mr Trevelyan is to arrive in Rugby the following Friday. States that in a fortnight's time they will 'be free'.

Believes that Arthur will leave England about 2 August, and announces that she is to go with Mrs [Anne?] and Miss [Isabella?] Thompson about 10 August, as Mr [Reginald?] Thompson 'must attend some Law Court in August'. Asks Henry to tell her as soon as he knows where he is going. Adds that she sent his two Dividends in a registered letter to Berlin.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Sir George Otto Trevelyan to Nora Sidgwick

Writes to express his sympathy, and that of his wife, with Nora on the death of Henry Sidgwick. Reports that Arthur Sidgwick has been keeping him up to date on Henry's progress, and claims that Henry's death 'is the most solemn event of [his] mature life'. Refers to the strong relationship which existed between Nora and Henry, the knowledge of which 'immeasurably increases the sad beauty and interest of reminiscences which even otherwise would have been so very precious.' Acknowledges the regret Henry felt at having his work cut short. States that his son George, who is with him and his wife, feels the same way about Henry as they do. Declares that they received the letter informing them of his illness three months previously, and that it seems like years. Explains that he has hurt his arm, and hopes that Nora can read his writing. Adds that it does not matter what they say, as she already knows what they feel about her and Henry.

Trevelyan, Sir George Otto (1838-1928) 2nd Baronet, statesman and historian

Letter from G.O. Trevelyan to Nora Sidgwick

Impossible that Henry Sidgwick 'should have named anything which would interest [him] more than the Byron' [to be left to Trevelyan?] Refers to one of the poems, the Ode to Napoleon, which is 'exceedingly characteristic of Cowell' and a pleasant reminder of the close friendship that united Cowell, Henry and himself. Has not been in the habit of keeping letters from anyone, but that he has kept, as a bookmark, 'a very tattered letter of Henry's of 1896'; also Henry's last two of May and July 1900, kept 'as priceless possessions.' Also possible that he may find one or two letters written to him at important occasions of his life, as his wife has kept a great many of them. Undertakes to send all that he has.

Trevelyan, Sir George Otto (1838-1928) 2nd Baronet, statesman and historian

Letter from G.O. Trevelyan to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that 'the division is put off' until the following week, and states that they would still love to come to visit Sidgwick, if the latter will still have them, from Saturday to Monday. Asks him to send an answer by telegraph.

Trevelyan, Sir George Otto (1838-1928) 2nd Baronet, statesman and historian

Results 1 to 30 of 1134