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Trevelyan, Caroline (c 1847-1928) wife of Sir George Otto Trevelyan, 2nd Baronet
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Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The Shiffolds. - Thanks his mother for her letter, and the sausages, which were 'much appreciated by Julian'. Mrs Ribàr [?] is staying here for a week. Will go up to London tomorrow, and stay at 14 Great College St for a night with Molly; thinks Charles is away. Is glad his mother likes the Tagore stories; some of them are 'a bit weak. and they certainly lose something in translation; but the best of them are really beautiful, and moving'.

The 'Russian Revolution is a splendid affair, and the best news we have had in our time'; possible that it may 'prolong the war a little', though he doubts it. Hopes that 'we too in England may soon recover our lost freedom'. Very glad that Booa [Mary Prestwich] is 'getting on well [after illness]'. Sends thanks to his father for sending 'the paper by Professor Herford', which much interested him; will write about it soon. Bessie and Julian are well. They are having 'storms every few hours, but the snow does not lie'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

c/o Mrs Hall, Veronica, Silverdale, near Carnforth. - By now his mother will have heard from Bessie about her 'change of plans'. Knows Bessie was 'very sorry indeed' to disappoint her, and it was 'a real disappointment to herself', but Robert thinks she is 'really rather run down, and in need of a week or two's bracing sea air'. Only heard this morning about her seeing the doctor, though knew when he left on Thursday that she intended to. Her tooth seems better, but is not yet right.

Expects Bessie will also have told her about their 'plans for the autumn'. The school [at Arnside?] 'seems a very good one in its modest way'; went to view it yesterday and liked all he saw. Miss Barthorpe [Julian's governess] seems to have insisted to her mother that she should stay until the end of July, which will make finding a substitute much easier. Does not think 'there is anything serious the matter with Bessie'; fortunately Julian is quite well. Robert will be 'within 3 miles of them, so can see them every day'; there is no room in their lodgings for him. The weather here is bad, but 'not so cold now the rain has come'.

Bottomley has lent Robert his copy of Gosse's [Life of] Swinburne, which is 'very amusing'. Hopes his father is well, and that she has a 'good journey to the Park'. Aunt Annie 'seemed well, though very busy'. Must catch the post, but will write how Bessie is when she comes next week.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

F. W. V. R. C. [Friends War Victims Relief Committee], A. P. O., S. 5, B. E. F., France. - Thanks her very much for 'paying the library bill'; encloses 'two bills for books to Constable [no longer present] and asks if she could send him the balance of the five pounds 'in penny stamps, which are always useful here to our Treasurer', who would give Robert French money for them. Thanks her for the subscription, which has 'proved very useful'.

Went to Sermaize [les-Bains] last week 'on library matters'; it is 'in the old war zone, having been destroyed in the first Marne battle' but is now 'largely rebuilt'. The countryside is 'very beautiful in a quiet way'. It is 'about our largest équipe'; expects they will soon start moving into the Verdun area, which will be 'the chief scene of our activities next year'. Has been corresponding with George about him sending them 'men and possibly motors early next year when his [ambulance] unit breaks up [see 14/101].

Hopes the move to Welcombe goes well; is very glad Annie [Philips] will be with them for some time. Everyone here is well, and 'the influenza seems to be decreasing'. Is glad to have 'so good an account of Julian from Bessie; he seems to be doing well [at school]. Is 'sorry to miss his first holiday, but hope to be at home during his second'.

Has been very busy recently getting a 'complete list' of the library's books 'to print in Reconstruction, our monthly, as a supplement'; there must be over a thousand by now. The weather is fine but cold. Sends love to his father.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

Paris. - Is glad that his parents 'have made a safe migration to Welcombe', and that his mother is well. Has recently been very busy preparing his catalogue [of books in the Friends War Victims Relief Committee's library], which is 'now printed, and will appear tomorrow as a Supplement to Reconstruction, our Monthly paper'; will send his father a copy. Has bought almost six hundred books for 971.80 francs, and thinks has got his money's worth on the whole. The other books 'belong to various members of the Mission, or to local équipe libraries'. 'Already, nearly a hundred books have been taken out by individuals'; has 'also lent about 350 to the local équipe libraries, and shall lend more from time to time'.

Sometimes sees 'quite interesting people' in the evenings, French, American, and English. Young [Francis] Birrell, his 'chief friend on the Mission', is coming up to Paris from Verdun soon 'to look after our publicity department, the purpose of which is to get money from America and England to carry on our work'. Robert follows politics as closely as he can from the newspapers, but 'of course hear nothing at first hand, except sometimes about French politics'. Does not know 'what will come of it all'; is 'not very hopeful' for his own lifetime, but 'cannot help hoping that the new world will be a better world one than the old one for Julian and his contemporaries when they are men and women'.

Is glad Aunt Annie will stay with his parents 'for some time'; asks his father to give his love to her when she comes; also to his mother, to whom he will write soon.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

I Tatti, Ponte a Mensola (sotto Settignano). - Has read in the papers of Trevelyan's mother's death; knows it was expected but imagines his sorrow and sends sympathies. Expresses an 'egoistical hope' that Trevelyan's travel plans, even if postponed, are not cancelled altogether. Has just returned from Turin, where 'Death has played terrible tricks' with some of his cousins recently, not at a great age. Sets out his immediate plans; he can come at any time from Rome to put Trevelyan up at Cortona.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wotton Lodge Nursing Home, Gloucester. - Thanks the Trevelyans for their letters following Catherine's operation [see 1/113 and 1/114]. She seems to be recovering well. The children are well and being cared for by grandmother or aunt. It is very good of the Trevelyans to offer a home for David, and please thank Lady Trevelyan for her kindness.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

7A Stanley Gardens. - Has left the Trevelyan's umbrella with the rug at Horbury Crescent; was surprised to find Miss [Marie?] Busch there. Liked what he saw of the theological students to whom he gave an address yesterday, though he is unsure whether these talks do much good. Pleased to see Bessie and Julian: hopes to see Julian in Cambridge. Asks about [Bob Trevelyan's mother's] will. Ends by quoting a 'maxim of Goethe' in German.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Letter decorated with stickers: a butterfly, kitten, and [?] milkmaid; a jester and bird [on the second page]. Is 'very well and happy'; hopes his family are too. Mr Arnold told him to ask her whether he is going to London, when, and by what train; is he to go with the 'London boys at 9.[0]5? The examinations have begun. The boys have not been to church today, as it was wet. There are 'eleven or twelve more days [until the end of term].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Is 'very happy', and hopes his family are all happy too. 'They' [the school authorities' say he is 'not very well', and he is going to 'have breakfast for a week'. Thinks that if she asks, Mr Arnold will let him have 'an exiat [sic]', as Arnold says he has been 'working well'. They have started football, and he 'likes it very much'. Sends love to all. There is going to be a magic lantern show at the school.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Decorated with transfer stickers of a fly, beetle and moths [?]. Is well and happy, hopes his family are too. Is 'going to try for the chess compitition [sic]', and Smith says he has 'a chance'. Asks what sort of bird Georgie caught. [James?] Tomlin gave him a moth. Thinks there are 'only more 60 days in the term'. Has 'bought the buterflie [sic] book from Browning' which he was meaning to buy anyway, for thirteen shillings: Newman's British Butterflies and Moths. Is going to write to Georgie soon. Sends love to all.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter; he is 'very happy'. It is a 'very windy and wet day today' and they cannot go to church. Sellar has come back to school, but Law has not yet. Asks his mother if she can send him some stamps, since there were none in his case. Sends love to all. They 'played football on Saturday morning because it was too cold [to play cricket?].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter. It rained today, so they will not go to church. There is 'another new boy called Lewin', who is in Robert's bedroom; he is 'rather a nice boy, but very small'. Sends love to all. Jane and Mrs Jephson have thanked Robert for his presents. One of his 'swaps was a Goldfinch which is rather rare'. They have begun cricket, and he still collects flowers.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter. Is 'glad there is nothing much the matter with Spider'. There 'are two Wilsons [at the school] and a Mayne, there is no Miles but there is a Syel coming next term'. Sends love to all. Will 'try and settle to work steadily'. It rained today and they could not go to church. 'Alexander and Fleming have gone and it is a good riddance of bad rubbish'. Adds a postscript asking if his mother can send him a scarf and his chess board.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter. Is 'glad Papa saw the Queen', and wonders what she is like. The Eton boys came on Tuesday, and Wixenford 'licked them 1-0'; Robert was 'in the eleven'. There was a paper chase on Wednesday, which was a 'very good one'; Tomlin was 'hare'. As well as eleven Eton boys, three came from Winchester, and played on the Wixenford side. S[ackville?] West came yesterday; Robert thinks for the last time this term. Sends love to all.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Has written to Charlie asking him to send 'his first impressions of Harrow'. Sends the '[school] newspaper for this fortnight', which includes 'a piece of poetry by Kingsl[e]y, which is the first he wrote', sent in by Mr Powles. Robert's 'bedroom is getting on very well'. Sends love to all. There is an away match with Mortimer on the 15th. The weather is 'very fine today'. Sellar and Hugo are coming down on the 13th. The 'book for Archie' is True to the Old Flag [by G. A. Henty].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Is sorry his mother is unwell; glad it is not serious. A boy called Weston wants to swap butterflies with him; asks if she thinks any would break if she brought his box from home when she comes. Is glad Charlie 'has got those eggs' [also a reference to butterfly collecting?]. The school began bathing on Thursday and the weather is 'beautifully fine'. Adds a postscript saying that he has not caught any butterflies yet, but has a 'Gold tail moth caterpillar'. Hopes his father, Aunt Margaret, and Georgie are well. Has got enough medicine, but Miss Bartlett said his mother might as well bring another 'bottle of Pancraticus, not the milky stuff'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[on headed notepaper for 40 Ennismore Gardens, SW]. Has just got the letter from 'Grandpapa' [Sir Charles Trevelyan or Robert Needham Philips], who told him not to bother answering; Robert will however write saying he has plenty of time to do so. The school 'got licked a little in a Cameron match'. Is looking forward to going to Wallington. The weather is very hot now. Is glad 'Harrow is winning' [in the Eton-Harrow cricket match?]. Asks his mother to thank 'Boar' [Mary Prestwich, known as 'Booa' to the Trevelyan family].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for 40 Ennismore Gardens, SW]. Thanks his mother for her letter, and asks her to thank his father for his. The school beat Mortimer one-nil, with Holt ma[jor] getting the goal. It was 'raining leaves as well as rain' during the match, and the 'ground was one mass of mud' and very slippery. By the end they were 'all covered with a thick coating of mud from head to foot' and he does not think their flannels will ever get clean; wishes Booa [Mary Prestwich] could have seen his new shirt. Grandpapa [Sir Charles Trevelyan or Robert Needham Philips] has sent him and Georgie a pound each, and they have both thanked him. Georgie has had a 'slight cold'. Adds a postscript asking if his mother knows whether [Nugent?] Hicks 'has got his dubble[sic]'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for 40 Ennismore Gardens, SW]. Mr Arnold is 'much better'; he asked Robert to let his parents know this when Robert saw him again yesterday. Is glad to hear Charlie is well enough to go back [to school]. He and G[eorge] are 'getting on very well'. Sorry she is having such bad weather; it was 'very fine' here this morning, but this afternoon there was rain and a little snow. Does not expect there will be any matches this term because of Mr Arnold's illness. Hopes his father is 'quite well'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for 40 Ennismore Gardens, SW]. Thanks his parents for their letters. Mr Arnold is 'getting much better'; Robert has been working with him for the last week on his Greek and Latin Prose. Robert's mother asked in her last letter when she could next visit; asks his father to tell her that Mr Arnold will not be well enough for about a fortnight, and Robert will let her know when he has recovered sufficiently. G[eorge] is 'getting on very well'. Has just finished reading a book called The Carved Cartoon [by Austin Clare] about the plague and fire of London. Is glad Charlie has returned to school and is all right.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for 40 Ennismore Gardens, SW]. Is glad the elections are now going better. Asks whether 'Uncle Harry' [Holland] and Mr Cussins [John James Cousins?] ' have got in. The candidates here [in Wixenford's Basingstoke constituency] were Mr Sclater-Booth and Mr Eve: Sclater-Booth 'the tory got in, by a huge majority'. He and the rest of the eleven went for a 'long walk' this afternoon; the match with Farnborough is next Thursday. Supposes they [he and Georgie] are going home to London first. The school beat Mortimer one-nil last Wednesday. Mr Arnold has lent Robert the translation of the Iliad, since he has finished the Odyssey. The minute hand of Robert's watch 'has disappeared'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Rumbold, 'like a stupid fool', left school on an 'exeat' and has caught the measles, so now perhaps 'there will be no more matches and no concert [concert]'. Does not think anyone should ever go on an exeat, as 'they are sure to bring some infection'. Is very glad Harrow is winning; they 'were licked by Farnborough, but not half so badly as they thought' since they are supposed to be the best of the teams Wixenford play. Wonders whether G[eorgie] will catch the measles.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Asks when Harrow breaks up, as Mr Arnold is going to invite [Nugent] Hicks or [Thomas James Chesshyre?] Tomlin to visit at the end of term. Beat Farnborough away this afternoon, one-nil'. Sends love to all. The train 'comes in at 10.27'. Is glad 'Mr [Charles?] Fenwick and Uncle Harry [Holland] have got in [to Parliament in the General Election].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The end of term is close: 'in fact there are less than 1,000,000 seconds' until it comes. The exam [for Harrow?] will be 'very exciting'. Though he has not yet decided on a 'present for Mr A[rnold]', Robert thinks he 'would like best something for his writing table, like a good paper-weight'; thinks it would be almost as good to get it at 'the beginning of the hols', though if his mother has already found something she could send it to Robert now.

Has written to C[harlie] today. G[eorgie] is 'quite well now, and is doing very well in his class'; Robert hopes he will be placed first or second. They did not go in for the history exam with the rest, as they were 'not good enough', but took it a month afterwards. Mr Arnold has got Mr [E.E.?] Bowen to 'look them over', and if they are good enough Mr Arnold will 'give a prize like Mr Bowen's'; if not, just an 'ordinary prize'.

They were beaten three-nil in the Farnborough match. Is reading 'Leslie Stephen's life of [Henry] Fawcett', and thinks it 'very interesting'. Is glad 'Spi[der?' is all right'; it is 'a great pity about Mr Gladstone'.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley, Winchfield:- Looking forward to re-assembling on 21 April, and hopes that they will see 'little Calverley' [at school]; they will do their 'best to understand him and help him and make him happy'. Is likely to be 'passing through town' during the holidays; will let her know the exact dates when they are confirmed, and will be 'most glad' to call at home 'or wherever it is most convenient for Mr Trevelyan'.

Is happy that, since Mr Trevelyan wrote to him, they have 'succeeded admirably' with one boy at Harrow the 'son of Mr Tomlin of 40 Sussex Gardens, Hyde Park", who 'took Lower Remove' when he went to Harrow last September, and by the end of the term was first; according to Dr Butler he beat 'two very able entrance scholars' to do so. Knows that Mr Trevelyan was keen to know that Wixenford really do their 'utmost to get a boy on to the best place that his powers might admit of, without over-pressuring him. Arnold's friend, and predecessor as head, Mr Powles, examined all the boys last term and 'gave a very good report of them'; trusts that the teaching at Wixenford will continue to improve. William Egerton, Mordaunt Lawson and Hugh Walford (6 Cromwell Gardens, Queen's Gate), all go to Harrow at the end of this term, but he regrets none of them can expect to be placed highly, as they are 'not even if our little first class here'. They hope one boy will 'take a high place at Eton after Easter', and that 'Mr Arthur Guest's son will pass well into the Britannia next term'.

Apologises for writing so much about his 'little people', but expects that the Trevelyans know some of them and will also be interested for the sake of their 'own little boy'. Encloses a paper with a list of the clothes and other things which boys usually bring, and one about Exeats [included, see 110/3].

Mrs Arnold sends her regards, and hopes that when summer comes Mrs Trevelyan will be able to visit Robert at school. Arnold adds a postscript thanking Mrs Trevelyan for her 'kind concern at our scarlatina trouble'; they have certainly had an 'anxious time', but all the invalids have returned and are doing well.

The enclosed printed letter headed 'EXEATS' is dated July 1881; it states that on the request of parents children may be permitted to leave school once per term, from 11.30 am on Saturday till 1.30 pm the following Monday, or from 11.20 on Wednesday till 1.30 the following day. Mr Arnold is keen that exits be kept to a minimum, as 'they have often a very unsettling effect on the boy', and may also introduce 'infectious illness' into the school.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley, Winchfield:- Luckily his time in London this holidays coincides with the Trevelyans' return: he will be able to come to the Admiralty on the 18th [April] and try to be there for 11 am. Miss Bartlett (the matron) will be glad to have instructions about health, and asks what infectious diseases Bobbie has had. Thinks he mentioned that the school will 'meet after Easter on April 21st'; a master will always travel on the 2.05 train from Wixenford to escort boys whose parents wish it, but expects she will be able to bring Bobbie herself this first time. His wife joins him in 'kind regards'.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley, Winchfield:- Thanks her for her instructions about Bobbie's journey [home]. He 'looks much better now than he did and his work shows a corresponding improvement'. Bobbie is 'very industrious' and willing to learn 'grammar and the like'; he 'fails most in applying his knowledge' in translating, but Arnold expects this will improve in time. In general they have 'every reason to be well satisfied with him, and he deserves a most happy holiday'.

It has also snowed at Wixenford, though much more lightly than in the North. He and Mrs Arnold both send regards. Adds a postscript saying that 'Little Tom Booth is flourishing', and they hope to see his father and sister in 'our little crowd on the 12th'.

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