Print preview Close

Showing 1428 results

Archival description
Trevelyan, Caroline (c 1847-1928), wife of Sir George Otto Trevelyan, 2nd Baronet
Print preview View:

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that were it not for the fact that he is to go to her in October, she would be very sorry to say that she cannot receive him that month. Reports that she was at Stone G[appe] a week previously, and was going again to the Chancery, when she heard from William of their sudden move to Guernsey, so she hastened home. States that the 'whole party' seemed in good spirits, and hopes to hear the following day of their arrival in Guernsey. Refers to Henry's attitude towards the move, and to William's return to Oxford, which had proved to be a disappointment. Announces that she is going to see Minnie the following Monday, and will see Martin and Arthur before they go to school. Declares that the loss of 'the Crescent Villa family' is great, and hopes that the move may bring some greater good to William. Asks Henry to write to tell her when he is going to visit in October. Adds that William was anxious to know from Henry the day of the Ad Eundem, and whether he [Henry] could go to Oxford. Suggests that she could ask Mr and Mrs Trevelyan. Offers him lodgings on 20 September in Oxford, if he has 'any difficulty about a bed' and doesn't mind the distance from Lincoln College, and states that Mary could make him very comfortable there.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Pleased that Elizabeth likes the idea of Booa [Mary Prestwich] coming up [to London to visit while she is having medical treatment]; Booa is also 'really pleased & touched', and will come to London on Monday to be there when Elizabeth arrives next day. Finds Sir George 'pretty well' but there is much to 'talk over & fix' so she cannot write a long letter. They are very interested in the advertisement [for Robert's book "Polyphemus and Other Poems"?] and glad all is going well. If she needed to telegraph, asks if she should do so to Westcott.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Encloses a reference for Nurse Haydon. Very sorry for Elizabeth's 'domestic troubles'; it is very difficult to get good young servants now; expects she will have to get a permanent one once they return from their travels as 'Mrs E[nticknap] will find, after once having tried it, that she cannot do without'. Asks when they expect to set off. Glad the Dolmetsches 'are started again, poor people'; wishes she could hear Elizabeth play the clavichord; would often be good if practising other instruments "was as silent to the rest of the house". Asks if she can play the violin again without discomfort. They have not yet read George's article ["The White Peril", "The Nineteenth century and after : a monthly review" Vol. 50, Iss. 298, (Dec 1901): 1043-1055]' but it seems to be interesting.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes all is well with Elizabeth and that they will soon be able to go on their travels as normal. Sir George was very pleased with their letters: it is a pleasure to help them, but 'nice to know [they] appreciate it'. Expects Robert's book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] in every post. George has 'made a sensation by his article ["The White Peril" in
"The Nineteenth Century" Vol. 50, Iss. 298, (Dec 1901): 1043-1055]'. Sir George is quite well again; they are taking drives and walking in the pleasant weather, and she superintends '"improvements"' and is preparing for Christmas. Hopes Elizabeth has good news of her uncle; asks if he will be at the Hague for Christmas. Is going to get Charlie to dress up as Father Christmas to give the school children their presents. Going to Welcombe on 3 or 4 January. Asks if Robert and Elizabeth have decided on Ravello or somewhere nearer.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to get Elizabeth's card, as was slightly anxious about the crossing [to the Netherlands] they just escaped what seems to have been a terrible gale in the Channel on Thursday. Asks if she and Robert got her letters at the Langham; if not, Robert should write to the manager as she does not want the postal orders she sent him to be lost. Very glad Elizabeth's uncle is better and that she feels well herself. The book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] arrived yesterday; they think it 'very attractive & quaint'; Sir George will write to Robert about it. Thinks it should have some success. The title page and 'Swallow' [illustrations by Roger Fry] are very pretty; likes the poem "The [Lady's] Bat" particularly, though she does not think the picture such a success. Sends their regards to Elizabeth's uncle, cousin Marie, and all her family, and hopes she has a very happy week.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very wintry weather; they were 'almost snowed up for three days' and the station could only be reached across the fields. The Runcimans have been here since Saturday; they are 'very pleasant young people' and she thinks Elizabeth would like Hilda, who was at St. Andrews and Girton and 'is very energetic and intelligent'. There is a shoot today; Mr [William?] Watson-Armstrong has joined them. Expecting a party of Charles and George's friends after Christmas, and hope to have 'three cheerful days' before leaving for Welcombe.

Returns to the letter on the following day; does not have an address so will send this to Ravello. Glad to hear that Elizabeth has had 'plenty of music at Amsterdam'. Pleased that Elizabeth's uncle liked George's article ["The White Peril", in "The Nineteenth Century"]. George is 'rather distressed about it' and would have written it 'with much greater care' if he had known it would attract so much attention; she thinks though that it has been useful. Asks if Elizabeth's uncle will soon return home; supposes he will not go south but stay there quietly for the winter. Sir George has now read "Polyphem[us & Other Poems]" carefully and will soon write to Robert. Hopes they had a pleasant time with Mr [Bernard] Berenson; asks how 'the ménage' goes on. Sends regards to Madame Palumbo and Mrs Reid wants to hear all about the Pension now as they know it. Has been very busy with Christmas presents, but all have been sent now. They think 'L[ord] R[osebery]'s speech helpful to a Peace [to end the Second Boer War]'

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Good to hear from Elizabeth [about Ravello]; sure 'the two elderly gentlemen' will be pleased to have them at meals; hopes she does not walk alone in 'very wild parts' because of 'wild dogs and uncultivated natives'. George has had his friend Robertson to stay and has just 'walked him off to Reedsmouth' in a downpour to meet his bag and go on to Carlisle. Has been busy with last arrangements and interviews; they leave by the early train on Thursday. Booa [Mary Prestwich] has left for Welcombe today. Sir George has been well recently but has just got a cold. Glad Elizabeth is going on with the translation, and looks forward to reading it; always thinks it 'foolish to spend time in translating french books, as everyone can read french', but very few people read Dutch. '[V]ery cheerful that the Liberals have 'won the Newmarket [by]election most triumphantly' [candidate Charles Rose]. Charles has not yet returned from Scotland; seems to be having a good time. Asks to be remembered to Mrs Reid and Madame Palumbo; asks if 'the old man at the Capucini at Amalfi' is still alive.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Thanks Elizabeth for her letter from Palermo; the orange flower is still fragrant. Glad they are seeing so much of Sicily, and hopes she is now with her cousins [Bramine and Tuttie] at Taormina. Has paid Elizabeth's subscription to the [Grosvenor Crescent] club and will do in future. Sir George has finished writing his book ["The American Revolution"] and will soon start getting the proofs. He is very happy and seems 'so much better already'; he is seeing his friends, they are dining out 'moderately', and have had a few people to dinner. George 'seems to live in Committees and interviews about the ["Independent] Review'. Glad Elizabeth is having music, and that the Waterfields are happy. Excitement in London about a new young violinist, Marie Hall; the story is that 'some connoisseur' heard her playing on the street and trained her; has not yet heard her. Has a ticket near Elizabeth for Joachim's concerts; hopes they can go together often. Robert's play ["Cecilia Gonzaga"] not out yet. Sends love to Elizabeth's relations and the Cacciolas. Asks if she could call on Mrs Bayley, daughter-in-law of Sir George's old friend Sir Steuart Bayley, whose health is not good enough to live with her husband in India.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Thanks for the two letters; is glad that Janet is coming to see Elizabeth and will be very pleased if they can be real friends; hopes Robert will like her too. Elizabeth need not go to Pen Moel if she does not want to; sure Aunt M[argaret Price] would understand. Sorry to hear about Dr Cacciola's illness; Florence will be 'much alarmed'; good the nephew Elizabeth mentions is nearby. Booa [Mary Prestwich] thinks the picture must be at Elizabeth's house. Very hot here. George is coming back on Monday, quite suddenly, so 'everyone can be told [about his engagement]'. Very glad Elizabeth is having music; 'fancy quartettes in Dorking!'. Mrs [Kate?] Courtney asked her to meet Mrs Pierson, but she could not go that afternoon ; Sir George met him there at breakfast. They return to town on 8 June; asks if Robert is coming to the [Apostles'] dinner on 17 June. Wants to have a family party with all the Wards; asks if they could come on the 15th or 16th.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Her arrangements yesterday went well; left London after completing 'various businesses', went to a committee in Stratford then on to Welcombe where she found Sir George 'cheerful'. The weather is fine, and they hope for a good day on Saturday; '85 Birm[ingha]m Liberals have accepted. Enjoyed her visit to Elizabeth and Robert; they are 'so good & affectionate' towards her. The Mill house is 'very nice & quaint' and the little guest-room 'very pretty', but it is time they moved. Sir George thinks their plan a good way of 'getting a place to settle in' that they really like. The walk they took was lovely; is sure Leith Hill 'would be most attractive'. Will be in town from Monday to Wednesday.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Elizabeth for her letters; it is a great pleasure to Caroline and Sir George to help her and Robert settle themselves 'really comfortably'; hopes the V[aughan] Williams proposal [to lease them land at Leith Hill on which to build a house] comes to pass. Is very sorry that Elizabeth has been 'worried & upset'; quite understands that Robert is 'trying' when he is upset, as 'All Trevelyans are inclined to be so sometimes, & "get on the nerves" of their women-kind'. Does not like to think of her being alone, and hopes her Dutch friend came yesterday and that she will go to stay with Aunt Annie [Philips] for a night. Aunt Margaret [Holland] has been 'laid up' for more than a fortnight 'with clots'; she has one in her hand and so cannot write; thinks she will tell her Elizabeth could come over and see her. Also suggests that Elizabeth could come to Wallington for a while, and Robert come to join her; they could then go home together and return on 1 September with George and Janet. Does not want Robert before 20 July, but Elizabeth could come earlier. Asks if she is getting any music; must find someone to accompany her at Wallington. Has been 'too cool for a cotton dress' here, though she hears dreadful things from a lady in London who 'nearly died' from the heat when she had to spend two days at the cricket with young people. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is very busy, as Grace has taken a holiday.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Originally enclosing a letter; does not think she answered Elizabeth's last as Sir George said he would write to say what they thought about the rent [to the Vaughan Williamses for the new house to be built at Leith Hill?]. Hopes Robert returned 'refreshed and well [from the Lakes]' and that she is not too bothered by 'the house business'; business arrangements with friends are always difficult. Hopes something will be settled at Leith Hill as it is such a beautiful place. Has had a letter from Janet [Ward] describing 'their interview with "the Master [of Trinity, Montagu Butler?]". He was very deaf, & George shouted, but his talk seems to have been very good'. She then walked fifteen miles with no ill effects: "Surely George has found the right wife!" 'The lady mother' [Mrs Humphry Ward] is coming to Wallington next week, as she is opening a school in Newcastle. They were expecting the Monkswells today, but [Lady Monkswell] is unwell and cannot come. Various young people are coming next month; asks if Elizabeth and Robert can come on 20 August for a week, returning on 1 September, or whether another time would suit them.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very sorry to hear that Elizabeth is not well; hope she is feeling better and that they will see her and Robert by Friday at the latest. If they make the journey in one day, she must go to bed when she arrives and 'let Booa [Mary Prestwich] nurse [her] up a little'. Does not think Theo [Llewelyn Davies] will come until Thursday or Friday. Sorry that Robert has rheumatism; hopes the change of air will help them both. The shoot today had to be put off because of bad weather. Annie [Philips] has to leave on Thursday, so they will just miss her. The trains are 'fairly regular' now so they can trust the later one; advice on the journey. Postscript on a separate sheet to say that C[harles] has just got the telegram; they are very sorry that Elizabeth does not feel well enough to travel till Friday; suggests train times.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Elizabeth enjoyed the visit to Chillingham, and that Mrs Cochrane plays well; seems to remember she is a 'better musician than Mrs Saxton Noble'. Hopes that the three weeks in the north have done her good. A 'big gathering of Liberal women' here yesterday, with a meeting then tea 'in the tent'. The shooting on Thursday was spoiled by a wet afternoon; Sir George has rheumatism in his hand. Janet 'very funny about the forgotten photograph'; she is 'a dear affectionate little person'. Keen to hear that 'the house business is prospering' and that the building of Robert and Elizabeth's house can start soon. Misses Elizabeth very much; was so nice seeing and 'nursing' her. Wants to hear about her trip to Holland, and what she decides about the violin.; also how the Enticknaps were. [John Joseph?] Nixon was 'much distressed' to miss Elizabeth and Robert. They have not yet finished [James's] "The Tragic Muse" as there has been little time for 'long reading'; has quite forgotten it and is interested to hear how it ends. Alone now till 21 September; Charlie leaves on Monday.

Results 1 to 30 of 1428