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Sanger, Charles Percy (1871-1930) barrister
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Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Glad to hear that [Joseph] Joachim was so nice to her; hopes she also enjoyed her evening with the Piersons. Has talked to his father, who has convinced him that they should invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding, as a relative; admits that it would be strange not to do so in England. Told his father it may cause difficulties with the Grandmonts; but he replied that politics should not enter into the matter. In a way it would be a slight to his father, since he wishes it, not to invite them; he would in that case not come over. Thinks that the Howards would not be 'much in the way' at the wedding, especially as his brothers and parents will be there; does not think him 'a bad fellow, and she, though dull, was quite harmless'; will not deny it would be pleasanter if they did not come. More serious if the Grandmonts really object; understands their feelings, though thinks them 'wrong and unreasonable'; they are among Bessie's best friends and good friends of his too, and it is through them that he and Bessie know each other; would be a great pity if they did not come. Does not think the fact her uncle, who will send the invitations, does not know the Howards is 'essential'. She will have to explain the situation to him; then the Grandmonts should probably be told as soon as possible so that they can make a decision. He or his father could write to her uncle to explain if she prefers.

The marriage conditions are all right; both he and his father will write to her uncle about them. Is going to Cambridge tomorrow and will see Tom Moore; wants to read him the two finished acts of the play. Will probably 'take wings' on Saturday evening: become an 'angel' and 'cease to be an active member of the Society of Apostles'. [Oswald?] Sickert is probably coming to Dorking the Sunday after; has worked well recently, and a few visitors will not make much difference. Sanger is back and seems well again, from the little Bob has seen of him. Has been to the tailors and it is hard to find material of the kind she wants; sends some more patterns, which he thinks will look lighter when made up and were lighter than the ones he wore for Roger [Fry's] wedding. The travelling clock which the servants have given them is very good; there was a note with it in Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s handwriting, which he copies out. Wants to write them a thank-you note, but is unsure how to address it; had better ask his mother.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - It is very good of her to see the matter [his father's wish that Sir Henry Howard and his wife be invited to the wedding] the way she does; not possible for 'these sort of things' to be ideal; does not think the Howards will really spoil much, and hopes the Grandmonts will not be 'unreasonable' and come too. Had to tell his father of the Grandmonts' objections or he would been angry when he called on Sir Henry at the Hague and found he had not been invited. His father does not know Sir Henry well, but his aunt [Alice] Dugdale does, and in general his family 'are on very good terms with the Howards of Corby, though not very closely related'. His relations would very likely be offended if Sir Henry were not invited; does not particularly care about Aunt Alice, but his father does, and he does care for his Aunt Margaret and does not know how she would react. Sanger is engaged, and therefore quite recovered. True that she [Dora Pease] 'behaved so badly to him' and there is a doubt whether she is really in love with him, but Bob is optimistic; [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson knows more and is reassuring; Bob has not yet seen Roger. Expects Sanger's wedding will be in July or August; wonders whether Bessie will like Dora, as people often do not and she has plenty of faults; yet she is not heartless. Splendid that Sanger is 'so miraculously cured'. Thinks he will go to Dorking on Thursday; MacCarthy and Sickert are coming to visit. Will write more later of what he did in Cambridge. Curious about Lily H[odgkin]; did know she was there [Dresden] and had just written to thank her for returning a book he lent her two years ago. Is glad to have her new photos, though does not think them very good.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is sure things will improve and she must not worry; as his mother says, 'it is really rather... a storm in a teacup'; it is nothing to compare to the happiness that will soon be theirs. Though he often fails 'through weakness and idleness', his life 'has been passionately devoted... to the best and most beautiful things which [his] imagination can attain to' and hers will be as well; lists all that will be good in their lives. Will write again to the consul [Henry Turing] if he does not hear from him today, since they need to know whether he can come on the 7th [June]; has also not heard from Sir Henry Howard, through whom he sent the letter; will send the second letter direct to Turing. There has been some delay at the lawyers about the settlements; has written to tell them to speed up. Bessie should tell him if he need do anything else regarding the marriage conditions her uncle sent. Thinks he may come over on 12 or 13 June. Meta Smith, his aunt Margaret's daughter, has sent a silver inkstand, and Mrs Holman Hunt a piece of Japanese silk. Had a good time at Cambridge: saw Mrs McTaggart, a 'nice quiet sort of person'; Tom Moore read his play and thinks it should come out well though he has pointed out 'some serious faults and suggested alterations'; Moore is going to give him a lot of his woodcuts, and has begun an Epithalamium for them, though since he has not got on with it says they should defer the wedding for a month. Asks what he should do about the Apostles' dinner; it will be 'quite exceptional this year', Harcourt is president and everyone will come; would very much like to go but will not break their honeymoon if she does not wish it. Very keen to go to the lakes eventually, but they could spend a few days before the dinner at Blackdown among his 'old haunts'; Mrs Enticknap's aunt lives in a farmhouse a mile from Roundhurst, which would be perfect. Hopes [Alice and Herbert] Jones' visit has been a success. [Desmond] MacCarthy is coming tomorrow for a few days and [Oswald?] Sickert on Sunday for the day. Will see [the Frys] this evening and discuss colours for the walls. Thinks [Charles] Sanger is very happy; is not entirely sure [about the marriage], since 'Dora has behaved so strangely', but everything seems to be coming right. Has ben reading Emerson on poetry and imagination and thinks it 'amazingly fine and right'. Most people think "Pères et enfants [Fathers and Sons]" is Turgenev's best book; he himself does not like the ending but finds the book charming; has heard the French translation, the only one he has read, is better than the German or English one - Sickert says so and he is half-German. Has ordered the trousers, and found the catalogue so will order the beds and so on next week. Glad Bessie got on with her socialist sister [Theodora]. has just had a note from Sir Henry Howard saying 7 June will suit Turing; she should let her uncle know. Does not think there will be further delay with the legal papers.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Received the letter Bob wrote on Friday this morning, which did her 'a great deal of good': she needs to be told that it is not worth getting depressed over little things on the 'frontier of [their] promised land'; will try to stay calm and wait to hear from his parents in response to her letter to his father. Last night she talked the matter [whether to invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding] over with her uncle again; he still has objections but did not come to any firm conclusion, and they agreed it would be best to wait until Bob's arrival. Sir George's letter, though, may 'upset all', as she would have to explain to her uncle and aunt about his decision [not to come to the wedding] if he does not change his mind. Does not think Bob realises that it would then look as if his father was 'mortally offended & angry', and her uncle would be sure to take it that way, which might lead to a 'brouille [quarrel]' between them. She has seen the misery of quarrels often in her life and would be very sorry if anything of the kind took place. Tells Bob he ought not to miss the [Cambridge] Apostles' dinner on 13 June; they could perhaps go to Blackdown for a while so he could go to Cambridge for it; will be 'a great thing' for him to be there 'so soon after [he has] obtained the dignity of a married man'. Is glad about [Charles] Sanger but wants to hear more.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Is glad that matters are resolving themselves, even if not in an ideal way; does not think her uncle 'had any right' to speak of them as he did, but since he has thereby found a way out of the difficulty, they must not mind, though it was he who caused the difficulty and did not write directly to Bob's father about his objections [to inviting the Howards to the wedding]. Thinks Bessie should not have written to his father instead of showing the letter to her family at once, but it was an understandable mistake. His mother was very sympathetic and wise about everything this morning. A shame Ambro [Hubrecht] altered the letter, but he might have been the one to 'bring him to reason'. He and his family do not want the religious marriage, neither does she, so there is no need for it; 'absurd' to suggest that Sir H[enry Howard] cares; his father will probably 'settle that difficulty in his letter'. There was a small delay with the legal papers, which are being sent today; would perhaps be best for him to stay in England until they are signed. Will probably go to Roundhurst with the Frys for a night on Friday. Must not take her uncle being hard on them too much to heart; he is wrong, so she can laugh at him privately; 'it is a great thing to laugh at people; it is much better than being bitter'. His father is very relieved and now wants to come to the wedding very much. Had a good time with MacCarthy and [Oswald?] Sickert, though he was anxious about Bessie. Is glad she likes the idea of going to Haslemere first. Thinks he told her that the [Apostles'] dinner is in London, not Cambridge, and they might stay the night there before going North. Berenson and some of his other friends have got together to buy the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry. He likes it very much 'as a work of art', as he likes almost all of her work; also as an instrument, though not as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch do. Will send her the list of contributors soon. The Holman Hunts have sent a 'charming piece of old Japanese print'. Will bring over his frock coat, new blue suit and new country suit; does not think he needs his London clothes, which are 'very old and shabby'. Needs a new topper [top hat]. Asks whether he should cross to Flushing or the Hoek.

Adds a postscript saying that he has been to a 'very amusing farce with [Henry Francis?] Previté', with 'lots of very good things in it about falling in love' which interested him more than would have been the case in 'the old days'. It was by [George] Bernard Shaw ["You Never Can Tell"?], whom Bessie may not have heard of. Will write tonight to Berenson and some of his 'clavichord friends'; his letter to the servants apparently pleased them very much. Sanger is 'at this moment writing to Dora on the same table'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Hopes his flowers reach her; his first since last summer, when he sent 'some Asphodel and some Mallow' ["Mallow and Asphodel", his first book of poetry]; they are mainly wild flowers. Explains the symbolism of all the flowers he has chosen, including ivy 'as the sacred plant of Bacchus' whom he worships 'in no vulgar sense, but as he was worshipped in the true esoteric mysteries'. Asks whether he should bring his poetry over to Holland or leave it in London. His father has written [to the lawyers] to say the papers must be ready to sign on Wednesday afternoon. Is going to London tomorrow; his parents will not return from Welcombe until Tuesday. The Enticknaps have given him a pair of brass candlesticks, which they could have in the dining room 'for ordinary use' or for reading in his room. [Charles] Sanger and [Robin] Mayor may cycle over for lunch or tea. Has had a 'delightful walk' and 'devised a new way of doing a mediaeval prose story' he has wanted to write for a long time. Has not done much German recently; will bring Wagner's librettos, which he thinks are 'damned fine poems'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Does not think Bob ought to wait longer than Wednesday night to come, even if the papers are not yet ready; will meet him at the station on Thursday morning and they can have a quiet day to themselves, their 'private marriage day'. On Friday morning she will be busy with people who are moving her belongings; they will have to go to the Town House [Stadhuis] that day to declare their intention to marry so that the 'publication' [ondertrouw] can take place on the next two Sundays. Has her last lesson [with Eldering] at Amsterdam on Saturday, and wants to go to the Röntgens for the last time with Bob and stay the night, if he does not mind staying in a hotel; on Sunday they must take the 'alto violin' to Mrs Asser, who has moved from Leiden to Haarlem, and can show them her Japanese prints on silk. Has been tearing up her old school exercise books, but has kept some. This afternoon, is going to say goodbye at the Children's Hospital where she used to teach. The Salomonsons are staying at the Hotel Cecil; Jeanne would be 'immensely pleased' if Bob could call on them briefly. Asks Bob to give [Charles Percy] Sanger her 'warmest congratulations'; he is a very good friend to follow Bob's example so soon [in getting engaged to Dora Pease].

Letter from A. Dorothea Sanger (née Pease) to Nora Sidgwick

Does not wish to intrude upon Nora, but wishes her to know what a real personal sorrow she feels at the death of Henry Sidgwick. It was he more than any other person who made Cambridge what it was and is to her: 'a source of the best sort of inspiration', which she got from his lectures. Says that he made her love him personally, 'as well as almost reverence him.' Adds that her husband wishes Nora to know that he too 'had all this feeling for Dr. Sidgwick'.

Sanger, Anna Dorothea (1865-1955) wife of Charles Percy Sanger

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Happy to go with Elizabeth to see the doctor; says she should make the appointment herself and gives Mrs Scharlieb's Harley Street address. Will be back in London on Monday. Glad Elizabeth is going; believes the doctor is 'very able in all such matters. A real pity the dress will not fit. Sir George is recovered from his [rheumatic] 'feverishness' now. Aunt Margaret [Holland] cannot have them on the 13th, and Sir George will not go in Ascot week, so thinks their visit will fall through; asks if they could still visit Elizabeth and Robert for a day as Sir George 'seems anxious for it'. Will 'ask the Sangers &c' but fears she is now 'getting too full'.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

Trinity College, Cambridge. - Is leaving Cambridge today so is glad Trevelyan is not coming. Cannot come to stay but thinks he can visit for the day. The world has been very kind to him recently so he will be good company. Hears Trevelyan's tragedy, which he expects was the one he was working on at Blackgang Chine ["Cecilia Gonzaga"?] is finished. Has spent the whole week in Cambridge, talking, and is looking forward to an evening alone; feels his desired ratio of company to solitude is that of 'whisky to water'. Is waiting for Sanger. Moore is very well and 'has defined metaphysics as the science of what doesn't exist'. Went to a ball last night, with plenty of young ladies and ice creams; got 'practically engaged'.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge; addressed to Trevelyan at Pensione Palumba, Ravello. - Has seen Miss Vaughan Williams, who has received a letter from Elizabeth Trevelyan. Writes to hear all the news from Italy. Is lecturing in Guildford next term, and possibly Cornwall. Has been to see Sanger, who was attacking the Pragmatists such as William James. Is working on a ghost story, "The Purple Envelope", which he intends for "Temple Bar". Has been to "The Confederacy" twice, and to "The Maid's Tragedy". If Trevelyan goes to Pesto [Paestum], asks to be remembered to the station master Amilcare Sabbattini. His 'largest' cousin has married 'a man with a crest', which he attaches.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

1, Garden Court, Temple, E. C. - Originally enclosing [Warre?] Cornish's article; asks Bob to acknowledge receipt if he does not send it back at once; if Bob could give his opinion this might help them [the editors of the "Independent Review?"] to form their judgment. Sends love to Bessie. Postscript on back of the letter informs Bob that Crompton [Llewelyn Davies] has gone to France with [Bertrand] Russell; he seemed 'much better [emphasized] before he left' [referring to Crompton having recently lost his brother Theodore]. The Sangers are expecting the birth of a baby in around October.

Letter from C. P. Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

58 Oakley Street, Chelsea, S.W. - Booksellers are 'disposed to deny all knowledge' of Bob's book ["Sisyphus"] and say it is 'not on Longman's list: Bob should 'stir up' his publishers. Has managed to get hold of it and thinks it 'much the best thing' Bob has done, though the 'queer metres & methods of scansion', which he supposes are influenced by [Robert] Bridges, are sometimes puzzling. Doubts however whether 'bigamy had been made a felony in the time of Sisyphus'. Hopes that Bessie and Paul are well.

Letter from Thomas Sturge Moore to R. C. Trevelyan

20 St James's Square, Holland Park, [London] W. - He and his wife heard the news [of Paul Trevelyan's death] from the Sangers the day evening before Bob's letter arrived, so were 'already full of sorrow and sympathy' for the Trevelyans. Too 'overwhelmed' by the thought of what losing their own children would mean to himself and Marie to offer more than 'a timid assurance of fellow-feeling', as far as is possible without 'the brutal experience'. They had hoped very much that Paul was getting strong again, so it is a real shock. Hopes that they will be able to 'bear up'.

Letter from Gerald Shove to R. C. Trevelyan

Bankes' Arms Hotel, Studland, Wareham. - Has taken rooms for a week at Agglestone House, Studland [Dorset], which is 'rather a beastly sort of "lodging-house"' but it is very hard to get accommodation in this area. Since the station, at Swanage, is around four miles away and transport has to be sent specially it would be 'more convenient and cheaper' if as many people as possible could arrive together. [C.P] Sanger and [Ralph?] Hawtrey come on Thursday; has not yet had any answer from Bertie [Russell] or Crompton [Llewelyn Davies]; [Saxon] Sydney-Turner cannot come. Asks Trevelyan which train he will arrive by, and how much luggage he will bring; would be possible to leave luggage at the station to be collected and walk to Studland.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

13A Hanover Terrace Ladbroke Grove. - Is sceptical about the translation of his books into German. Sorry to hear that Trevelyan has had mumps; hopes he has now recovered. At heart is miserable about the state of Europe; distractions include dinner with Clive [Bell?] and [Ralph?] Hawtrey, and the new letters of Byron, which he discusses at length with comments on morality. Has also been reading the 'absurd' book ["Home Life with Herbert Spencer"]. Morgan [Forster] has returned, unhappy because he cannot write (with which Trevelyan will sympathise). Met Bertie [Russell] and his wife at the Sangers'; does not think he will like 'Mrs Bertie'. Mrs [Beatrice] Mayor's two plays ["The Girl and the City" and "Thirty Minutes in a Street"] were acted on Sunday; supposes they were not much of a success but he was interested by them, particularly that acted by her sister [Betty Potter]. Has had long walk with [Nathaniel] Wedd who is 'gallant' but not well; Dickinson sceptical about the psychoanalysis he is receiving. Sends best regards to Trevelyan and his hosts.

Notebook with draft of R. C. Trevelyan's "Sulla", translations by him of Aeschylus's "Prometheus Bound" and Lucretius, and draft Apostles' dinner speech

Few pages draft of Trevelyan's "Sulla", here entitled "Sulla & Satyr". Notebook used from other end in for translation of Aeschylus' "Prometheus Bound" a draft speech to the Cambridge Apostles [presumably the annual dinner]; in praise of air and fire in response to a speech by E. M. Forster praising the other two elements, and spinning a tale of a philosophical society among the Greek gods in defiance of Sanger's hope that Trevelyan would avoid 'poetical quotations and classical myths'. Also translation of Lucretius, "De Rerum Natura", book 2 line 398ff [marked with scrap of paper].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Has just returned from the Lake Hunt, 'stiff, but not crippled': describes some events of the three days of hunting, including being a hare on Sunday, when he 'enticed 3 hounds up Kirkfell (nearly 3000 feet)'; draws a map [on the last page] to illustrate his capture by hounds including Charles and young George. Was driven to catch his train by [Laurence John?] Cadbury 'who makes cocoa' in 'a care that looks as if it were made of silver'; the roads were 'full of Whitsuntide motors' but Cadbury 'drives very skilfully' and, passing the cars and charabancs where he could, sometimes went up to 80 miles an hour by the speedometer when the road was clear. Has almost recovered from the 'stiffness' caused by the Hunt. The Sangers and Dorothy Reece [later Dorothy Archibald] have been visiting; Mrs Sanger is still here, until Monday, when [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson is visiting. Elizabeth went up to London with Mr Sanger and Daphne to see Wagner's "Meistersinger", and returns tonight. The 'Exhibition has been demolished' after 'enormous' crowds in its last days, including 'the chairman of the I[ndependent] L[abour] P[arty: Clifford Allen], the ex-President of the Board of Works, the King, the Prince of Wales in Ivel cheese, and several distinguished literary personages.' Hopes Julian is enjoying bathing.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Reminds Julian to send a copy of the 'last "Ray" [school magazine?] to Auntie Mien [Röntgen]. Apologises for not writing about the Lake Hunt sooner, but has been very busy. The day before, uncle Charles drove him and Molly to visit Wordsworth's Dove Cottage at Grasmere; Charles had a bad knee, and 'could hardly walk, much less hunt'. He himself was a hare on the first day, and was 'not caught till 4.30'; the next day he chased the 'youngest and fastest hare, down a dreadful scree', then when searching for him in some rocks 'heard Molly shouting a long way off' and saw another hare in the valley being chased by uncle George, whom he cut off and enabled George to catch. Was 'so tired and stiff' next day that he accepted an offer to be driven to Leeds to catch an express train home. Saw the Sangers, who were visiting but have now left; Dorothy Archibald 'who used to be Mrs Reece' is staying. Matthews has taken away the wireless as it was not working, but says he can re-install it any time next week. Elizabeth and 'cousin Littie' are going to visit Julian and stay with the [Sturge] Moores; if he himself comes it will just be for the day. The cuckoos are still singing, but are 'usually out of tune'; the azaleas are at their best. C[lifford] A[llen]'s architect brother [Godfrey] has been to visit; thinks Julian would like him, so perhaps they will get him to visit again when Julian is here. He 'looks after St Paul's [Cathedral, London] and says they are probably going to do the wrong thing about it'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Glad that Julian is having a good time at Hamburg; envies him 'the chance of learning German properly' and seeing Wagner 'performed properly'. The Viennese opera company recently performed the "Ring" in London; the singing was very good, but the 'Covent Garden scenery and stage-resources' were 'miserable... it was a national disgrace'. Can send a German libretto with English translation for the "Ring" or "Tristan and Isolde" if Julian wants. Dorothy [Archibald?] 'has measles quite badly' but is now recovering. He and Elizabeth are going to Welcombe for a few days next week, then to Oxford to visit [Robert] Bridges 'the Poet Laureate, a few leaves from whose wreath I hope to steal'. The Sangers and Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] visited at Whitsun; Goldie may return when Dorothy is well. Saw George Moore in London this week, who recommended that Julian read Bertrand Russell's last book "An Outline of Philosophy"; thought he had it but can't find it, and is writing to ask if he has lent it to Goldie. Moore also thought that Julian might 'find some of the books dull reading them alone', but it would be much more interesting to go to lectures and discuss the ideas with others. The Welcombe Mabuse [Gossaert] was sold last week at Christies, and fetched more than any other picture except 'a fine early Rubens portrait'. Charles was there, and got a Canaletto of Venice for uncle George for Hallington. Asks to be remembered to Professor [Albrecht?] Mendelssohn [Bartholdy?], who visited some years ago; hopes he will visit again one day.

Letter from Bertrand Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Beacon Hill School, Harting, Petersfield. - Thanks Bessie for her kind letter; the Russells are now over their anxiety about [their daughter] Kate who has now completely recovered. The operation was late in the evening of the 23rd so Kate had 'a pretty miserable Christmas', but enjoyed her birthday on the 29th. Dora got sciatica from getting out of bed on cold nights to look after her, and is now in London having it dealt with. According to the surgeons there has been an 'epidemic of mastoids as a consequence of influenza', and there has been another case at the school, but that is also no longer serious. They all remember the Christmas they spent at the Shiffolds; John will never forget Julian's electric train. They often hear of the Trevelyans through Charlie Sanger; invites them to visit, as it is a very easy car journey and he thinks they would enjoy seeing the children.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

When in town last week, saw Roger [Fry], who advised him to see [Frederick] Porter; Porter seemed 'a very sensible sort of man', and he thinks Julian would like him. Porter thinks Julian should come and visit him at his house in Chiswick when the Cambridge term is over and show him some drawing; he is going to France for a fortnight in July and perhaps Julian could go with him. Likes what he has seen of Porter's painting; he teaches at the Central School of Art[s and Crafts]. Does not think he will come to Cambridge on 8 June, but Bessie probably will. Had quite a good [Lake] Hunt, but left on Monday. The Sangers are visiting.

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