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Trevelyan, George Macaulay (1876–1962), historian, public educator, and conservationist
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Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Bessie for her letter, and for enclosing Madame [Irene] Zocco's; very glad to hear 'how well and splendid Julian is ', which makes up for their sadness about the nurse's illness. Glad Julian has curls; Humphry is also 'very curly' but this is 'more out of the family line' for them. He and Mary 'play Lake Regillus and Horatius on the Museum floor' with some soldiers and some 'ancient Romans' he once got in Switzerland; she is 'very clever and sharp at the uptake'. Meanwhile Theo usually rides the rocking horse, though he looks on a little, 'and spouts the poems' [by Macaulay]. He is 'very much interested' ('much' is an insertion as 'concession to Jan's hereditary ideas of grammar') about [Donald] Tovey; takes it that his progress [on the opera "The Bride of Dionysus", to Robert's libretto] is 'slow but sure'. Must be very interesting to watch him at work. Can easily believe what she says about Forster's book ["Howard's End"], which would make it 'like all his others'; he is 'just one half of a great writer' and could do with being boiled down by 'Peer Gynt's button moulder' with 'some ordinary mechanic writer who can spin him a common likely plot'. Sends love to Bob and wishes 'success to his Solomon, and the Sage' [a reference to Bob's "Foolishness of Solomon"?].

Note from Janet offering condolences for 'poor Nurse Catt's departure'; asks to be remembered to her before she leaves.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Has sent Withers's letter to Robert on to George; sorry about the trouble Robert and Elizabeth are having [over Florence Trevelyan's will]; luckily Sir George and Caroline have plenty [of money] of their own, which will 'all be for [their] sons and daughters'. Discusses a letter he has had from Philipson; does not know the value of the land at Taormina and imagines Robert may incline towards not acting as executor, not paying the sixty thousand francs, and renouncing the property; Withers and Davies are 'wise advisers'. Glad that he himself refused to be a Trustee, which none of the family ought to be 'on any account'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Glad to hear from Charles that 'the Name & Arms are dead'. Originally enclosing something which 'may interest' Bob. Notes in a postscript that he has read 'nearly all the Macaulay journals' and thinks it would be 'a mistake to make an extensive publication of them': their father had produced an edited version 'with great skill' ["Marginal notes by Lord Macaulay"]; much of the rest is interesting 'if one really cares about Macaulay' but never meant for publication.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne. - Has been looking at the books left to him in their father's will, and believes that Bob should have the collection of over a hundred volumes in the 'Pipontine [sic: Bipontine] or Deux Ponts Edition in old white binding', currently in Sir George's study, many of which contain notes by Macaulay. Feels that Bob would appreciate these notes much better than he would himself, since they are 'on points of classical scholarship and history in which [he is] an ignoramus'. Would give him great pleasure to think of the books 'in the new Library at the Shiffolds' and often read by Bob.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hotel des Alpes, Mürren. - Arrived yesterday and plan to stay for more than a week; it is a 'wonderful place' though the air is 'rather fatiguing' at first. She will rest today; Sir George is very well and 'walks a great deal'. The electric railway to Interlaken is pleasant and travels through some fine passes. Very sorry to hear from Elizabeth about the Russells; [their separation] is 'surprising and very sad'; sure Russell is 'difficult, & the family are rather uncompromising' but he is 'a quiet good fellow'; does not know her [Alys] well but thought she seemed 'to belong to another "monde"'. Likes to think of Julian almost walking; asked what is settled about the nurses, and whether Mrs Catt is going to the hospital; it is very sad. People must be very anxious about the weather [for the Coronation]; is glad to be 'out of it all'; Mürren is completely quiet, with no road for carriages, and Bob would love it. Glad Julian likes his cart. George says [he and Janet] are going on 12 July to the Lakes, and would like to come to Wallington in September; asks if Elizabeth and Robert could be there for some of that time. Is glad the [Lake] Hunt was a success once more, it is 'a wonderful institution'. Thinks C[harles] and M[ary] will enjoy themselves at the [Coronation] festivities. Sends love to Robert, and asks if Mr [Roger] Fry is coming.

Letter from F. W. Pethick-Lawrence to Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence

Brixton Prison.—Encourages her with reflections on the ability of the human spirit to transcend material circumstances. Refers to his study of French and Italian, and his other reading, and describes a method of counting on the fingers.

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Transcript

Brixton Prison
19th June 1912

Dearest

How delightful it is to think that this actual paper will be carried to you & that I shall get a reply written by yourself! I have sent you in my thoughts many messages of love which I feel confident have reached you, just as yours have reached me bringing their rich benison with them; But the actual written word gives tangible shape & contact & certainty.

I have not been in any way anxious about you, & equally you have I am sure not been anxious about me. You know that the one thing, which alone always seems worth while to me, is that the human spirit should transcend the whole of the material world; & therefore you do not need to be told that not in the very smallest degree have I been dismayed or discouraged by my environment. Dearest, here in the stillness—that is, to me, essentially the stillness of earth life—I am conscious only of the great spiritual tie which binds us together & binds us to the great Power which guides us. These are days when one drinks of the deep wells of life & because the draft is pure & crystal it refreshes & invigorates far beyond any draft of ordinary daily life. Or again it is as though the noisy overtones which make the chords & discords of the work-a-day world were hushed, & the fundamental notes were heard alone in all their simple grandeur. Or again it seems to me as though of the beauty, which is in the outer world & which our senses detect, the spirit itself had become perceptible to our souls direct.

One of my great joys is to watch the sunlight in the evening on the walls of my cell; some-times the nights are dull & then I miss it, but more often the last hours are bright. It sinks below a house close by about a quarter past seven and is then shut off from sight; each evening the last rays go a little further on the wall than the evening before, but we are coming soon (next Friday) to the longest day & after that it will begin to go back again.

Now you will want to know all I have been reading; First let me say it is surprising how little time I seem to have though I scarcely miss a minute of the day. Nevertheless I have read a larger number of books since I came in. I haven’t made so very much progress in Italian so I daresay you will nearly have caught up to where I am reckoning in what I did before. In the Berlitz Book, which I think you have got also, I have got to page 50. For the last few days I have laid it aside for a study of French which has caught my fancy, but I shall come back to it again in a little while & then I shall probably go on until I finish the book. I have been fascinated with Trevelyans† story of the siege of Rome {1}. It is really the volume preceding the one on Garabaldi’s† Thousand, & it is in my judgment a good deal the finer of the two. Have you read it? I cannot remember. Then I have read over again the story of the Thousand & hope shortly to read the third volume which I understand is now out. I have also got Crispi’s account of the same events {2} but have not read it yet. I have also read a book on radium, & one on Faraday which have inter-ested me very much. During the last week I have been wrestling with Green’s history of England {3} & with a very ponderous life of Henry Newman {4} which though good is very heavy to di-gest. A great soul was Newman, but somehow I can’t help feeling that he lost his way; perhaps a wider understanding might make one see it differently. In addition to other things I have also read a good deal of lighter literature including Pecheur d Island† {5} which I think delightful & two books by Mark Twain—Tom Sawyer & Huckleberry Finn—which Annie gave me. You should get May to send them to you[;] they are full of delicious humour.

May has been very good to me, so thoughtful & kind, sending me everything I could possibly want.

I think you will be amused to know that once when I was taking exercise by walking up & down my cell, I started counting my walks on my fingers & arrived at the following:—it is of course said that on the fingers of the two hands one can count from one up to ten, but that is only by reckoning each finger of each hand to count one only; if the fingers of the left hand are allowed to have a different value from the fingers of the right, one can count all the way from one up to 35 (that is six times six less one), & if the thumbs of each hand are also allowed to count differently from the fingers, then one can count all the way from 1 up to 99. One may even go further but if I do so you will say I am becoming like I was on the top of the omnibus on that famous occasion! Anyhow I don’t think you will mind this little digression. Perhaps you will be able to work it out yourself!

Dearest how close we have been together all this month for all the physical barriers that have been between us. I have treasured your beautiful words about Whit Sunday in my heart & they have been a great joy to me. I have thought very much about you and shall be thinking of you so in the next few days, but they will not be thoughts of anxiety but of confidence & assurance. You well know that my spirit is behind yours sustaining you in all that you do, & I know & have the certainty that your spirit is behind mine; & so together we are very strong.

Dearest the sun is shining brilliantly, it is a gorgeous & magnificent day! I am full of radiant life.

My very great love to you

Your husband.

P.S Your dear delightful letter has just come; you seem to have been able to write a day earlier than me. I have read it through with such pleasure & shall read it and reread it many times; but I am so anxious to get this off without any delay so that you may have it soon. Blessings on you for all your dear words. Ever thine

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One folded sheet. At the head is printed, ‘In replying to this letter, please write on the envelope:— Number 7294 Name Lawrence F W. P.’, the name and number being filled in by hand. The word ‘Prison’ of the address and the first two digits of the year are also printed, and the letter is marked with the reference ‘C1/12’ and some initials. Strokes of letters omitted either deliberately or in haste have been supplied silently.

{1} Garibaldi’s Defence of the Roman Republic, by George Macaulay Trevelyan (1907), the first book of a trilogy which also comprised Garibaldi and the Thousand (1909), and Garibaldi and the Making of Italy (1911).

{2} Probably The Memoirs of Francesco Crispi (2 vols., 1912).

{3} A Short History of the English People, by J. R. Green, first published in 1874, or perhaps his expanded History of the English People (4 vols., 1878–80).

{4} The Life of John Henry, Cardinal Newman, by Wilfrid Ward (2 vols., 1912).

{5} Pêcheur d’Islande (An Iceland Fisherman), by Pierre Loti (1886).

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear that Elizabeth is well and that Robert is losing his cold; hopes the Booths [Charles and Meg] arrive safely. Sir George has been troubled by rheumatism for a while; thinks he is recovering but he is 'low & out of sorts'; he has been able to work and take walks everyday, not liking to stay in bed which she thinks may have been best. S[idney] Colvin and Morton Philips are coming on Sunday, alone as both their wives are ill; they have also had neighbours visiting for tea. Has been busy with things in the village; Mr Clarke was here this week. They are expecting news from Cheyne Gardens [of the birth of Janet and George's child]; the preparations were made long ago. The ["Independent] review" is 'in a bad way' but George 'has made up his mind to it'. Meggy [Price] has sent her a very amusing letter from Phil [Morgan Philips Price], who 'led the interruptions' at [Henry] Chaplin's meeting at Cambridge in 'a most intelligent & effective way'. Sir George enjoyed Robert's letter about classics and 'keeps it as a marker!'; sends love from him and Booa [Mary Prestwich], who was 'quite anxious' about Elizabeth.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Has arranged with [William] Rothenstein to go to be sketched by him early next year; is too busy before Christmas. Has told the publishers to send a copy of the [George] Meredith poems to Bessie at the Shiffolds when they come out next week; Sir George and Caroline will get a copy at Wallington, so she can leave her copy at home or send for it as she likes; the letters, out this week, are 'well worth reading'. Adds a postscript sending 'love to the Stadtholder'.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Is delighted that Trevelyan is on his way and in good company; Lina [Waterfield] may not have seen the article he encloses, he expects she will be pleased with the passage about herself and Mrs Ross. Must see Trevelyan, and would be very pleased to host him and Julian; 'Mr Artuffo', whom he names for the first time [see also 5/118] feels that he must work for the money he received, as suggested 'by some lady-interventionists... afraid of hurting his pride' and mistaking Trevelyan for his brother [George]. A historical work on Piedmont has been suggested. Mrs Waterfield probably knows Artuffo, and may be able to come up with something. He must think he is doing something for the money he has already received, even if the work would be 'quite useless'; this is 'a typical Italian request'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne. - Charles showed him a letter from Bob about Welcombe yesterday, which gave him 'the greatest satisfaction'; had always hoped that Bob would sell the house if offered £100 000; glad that he is likely to get more. The National Trust 'had dealings with Place' over both Ashridge and Hatfield Forest, and found him ''much better in his ideas and conduct than many other "estate breakers"' who are 'often ruthless both to tenants and to beauty'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Not surprised that the Apostles are considering whether they should 'take notice of JECW' [James Edward Cowell Weldon, who had cancelled the annual dinner with little warning], but expects there is 'something to be said on both sides'. Is interested in both [Crompton and Theodore Llewelyn] Davies, and hopes they will both get fellowships next year; supposes postponement is 'not as bad a thing' as it was in his time. Glad that George is doing so well. Is rather busy; has never seen less game around the lower estate, but does well without it.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Seatoller. - Expects Bob is enjoying himself abroad. Is having a good time at Seatoller with [Maurice?] Amos, [Ralph] Wedgwood and [George] Moore; Vaughan Williams left a few days ago; he and Wedgwood 'bathe in Cambridge pool every morning'; Amos and Wedgwood work hard for their triposes, while Moore chiefly reads "Jane Eyre" and other novels, and George 'all sorts of jolly books', none for his tripos. They are all getting on well, even better than at Stye since there is not the 'slight distance between Moore and Wedgwood'. They go up the mountains in the afternoon; he and Moore, as 'the Wordsworthians of the party' went over to Grasmere and Rydal; describes Dove Cottage, de Quincey's extension to it, and S.T.C. [Samuel Taylor Coleridge]'s house. Declares that there were 'men in England then', also naming Scott, Shelley, Byron and Keats. George got his scholarship; does not seem fair that Wedgwood has not, while they give one to someone like Charlie Buxton 'of very ordinary ability' in their first year; thinks this is 'bolstering up classics'. It is however a sign that the college is doing 'their duty to history' that there is now an entrance scholarship for it. Is glad at a personal level that Buxton has a scholarship: he and George will have plenty of money to go abroad in the long vacation now. Elliott has not got a scholarship, but is spoken of as 'certain' next year. Had a nice letter from Bowen; German measles is active in [Grove] house. Asks Bob to write to him about the novel if he needs someone to discuss it with: he knows the plan and beginning, and will keep it secret. Wedgwood is a really good rock climber. Notes in postscript that he will be seeing Moore's brother [Thomas] in London again next week, so Bob should write there.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Sends good wishes for Elizabeth's birthday tomorrow, and a present to match the brushes she gave her last year. Very interesting about the houses; hopes to hear what they find at Fernhurst. George left yesterday; hopes he will have a good holiday. Asks if her last letter went astray. Glad Elizabeth enjoyed having her sister Mien Rontgen] to stay; she 'looks such an amiable sensible person'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry to hear that 'Nannie is "hors de combat"'; was afraid the large group would be too much. Elizabeth must get one of her extra nurses, or she will wear herself out. Hopes Mrs Abercrombie recovers soon; if the baby [Ralph] needs to be hand-fed, Elizabeth must certainly get help. G[eorge's] expedition [to Serbia?] is risky but 'very useful, & the best he could do'; since no-one is safe, it is best to be doing something. She and Sir George are very busy, so she does not feel 'quite useless'. Feels 'more angry than alarmed', which the Germans will find is the general response of the English to their 'methods'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Delighted that Elizabeth is 'enjoying the Booths' company'; very sorry that C[harles] Booth is so unwell, as heart problems are hard to deal with. She and Sir George agree with what she says about him: it is 'extraordinary' that he has such a 'knowledge of the working class' and yet 'his conclusions are so vague & formless, & so absolutely unsuited to practical politics'. Thinks something must happen soon at Cheyne Gardens; Janet [due to give birth] is well, but when Caroline took her on a drive yesterday she 'seemed less comfortable'. Charles and Mary are well and come to dine tonight. Politics very interesting: the Government have 'got into another disgraceful mess about Ireland' but obviously 'intend to stay in as long as possible'. She and Sir George went to a Court last night; she had a new grey dress, and Pantlin 'made up [her] last years train with grey chiffon'; they saw many friends and left early. Went to Broadwoods about pianos; they say they pay little for grand pianos since 'no one buys them now', so she thinks they must put up with the size of the piano in London and buy a small upright for Welcombe, in light oak to suit the room; Elizabeth can choose it. Asks if she will return to England much before Easter. Mr Gow [Thomas Gow, a Northumberland neighbour?] is very ill and may die; he is eighty-seven. Has written to Robert about his book ["The Birth of Parsival"?]. Janet likes it and quoted a passage she found beautiful. Annie [Philiips] is coming up this afternoon. Good that Elizabeth and Robert's new house is nearly finished; it has been a 'wonderful winter for building'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Athenaeum, Pall Mall, S.W.1. - Delighted to get Elizabeth's letter; interesting that her life falls 'exactly into 2 parts of 25'. Enjoyed Holland very much at Easter, and Bessie's friends were very kind to them; this made a big impression on his mind, and 'on the perhaps more impressionable virgin soil of Mary's'. Much enjoyed seeing Bob at the Hunt, and reading his 'book of poetic criticism' ["Thamyris: or, is there a future for poetry?"]. Love from himself and Janet; tells Bessie to 'live another 25 years until Julian is a very distinguished architect'; to reach seventy-five is all he asks for himself and others.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne. - Has received a letter from Withers saying that Bob will pay George 1500 francs, which will be 'very useful'; this is a 'very pleasant after-math to the whole of our family business' beginning four years ago [on the death of Florence Trevelyan's husband Salvatore Cacciola]. Has just finished writing a memoir on their father, which he plans to publish 'next spring unless the country has been ruined'; has had copies made and will give them to his brothers; suggests possible weekends for Bob to come to Cambridge, or for George himself to visit the Shiffolds, to discuss it.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Elizabeth will have heard that George and Janet's baby was born on Sunday morning. Janet stayed well despite the delay, and all went well for the birth. The baby is 'plump & peaceful & quite pretty', with grey eyes and lots of brown hair; Sir George went to see her yesterday and seemed pleased. George gazes at her 'in quite a sentimental way'. Caroline has not yet seen Janet, but will soon, and she seems to be comfortable; the baby is to be called Mary Caroline after her grandmothers. Has not asked 'what religious denomination she is to be brought up in!!'. Aunt Margaret [Holland] has returned from a visit to Brighton and seems fairly well again; Caroline thinks she is unwise to go to Court on Friday to see Margaret Smith and 'two other grand daughters' presented. Sends love to Mary [Booth] if she has arrived. Asks when Elizabeth and Robert will return to England. She and Sir George have been to see Bernard Shaw's "John Bull ['s Other Island]"; found it 'amusing' but not his best play. Charles and Mary are well. The Government is 'getting more & more discredited'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - Has got the typescript [of Bessie's translation of Robert Fruin's "The Siege and Relief of Leyden in 1574"], and will begin reading it 'most eagerly'; the map looks 'just what one wants'; will read it at once; begins his 'peregrinations' to Cornwall, Ireland and elsewhere at the end of next week, so asks if he should return the typescript before he leaves then get it back when they meet in Northumberland at the end of August; perhaps by then he can see [Pieter] Geyl's notes, which he ought to see before writing a preface. She may wish him to keep it if it is a duplicate. Apologises, but he knows no-one connected with Bumpus [John and Edward Bumpus Ltd, publisher?]

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Discusses post times. The weather has been 'absolutely beastly' and he has a cold, which gave him a nose-bleed this morning. Took a day off yesterday and lunched with the Frys; [Roger] Fry is very busy, having had to give an extra lecture last week, so Bob conveys his advice on house decoration. Need good painters, as [George?] Moore had trouble when he was having his Cambridge rooms done, due to the 'stupidity of the workmen'. Gives his aunt Meg Price's address. Thinks he is becoming 'more romantic' about her; wishes he had been with her to 'caress... and explain away [his] last cruel letter' in which he thoughtlessly exaggerated his 'regret at [his] fading days of singleness' [9/119]. She will certainly not come between him and his friends, as she has 'quite enough of their own intellectual qualities to be their friend in the same way' he is. Has usually gone abroad alone and not allowed his 'sensations to be interfered with by those of others'; will probably enjoy going to Greece more with her than with 'people like Daniel and Mayor'. Attempts to explain his feelings in detail. Will be able to talk freely to his friends after his marriage, though 'it is true that men do talk more obscenely, and more blasphemously, than they ever quite dare to talk before women' and he thinks that this difference is right. Should not have written 'so carelessly' and caused her pain. Has written to her uncle saying he and she should fix the date. Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies came for tea last Sunday; he is probably going to the Lizard at Easter; he said his brother [Arthur?] and his wife went to Land's End for his honeymoon which was 'very satisfactory', but that Savernake near Salisbury plain was the 'best place conceivable', with 'every kind of scenery' only an hour from London. He says it has a good inn; Bob may look on his way to Cornwall. Seatoller [in Borrowdale] is very nice too, but much further away. Has not yet heard from Daniel how Sanger is; will tell Bessie [about Sanger's unhappy love affair] when he sees her; she guessed correctly that the woman was Dora. He and Fry still think it would have been best for them to marry, but that now seems unlikely; her treatment of him is 'not through heartlessness exactly... but owing to circumstances, and also to her rather unusual temperament'. Has done some work, and has been re-reading Flaubert's letters; feels more in sympathy with him than any other modern writer. His mother says Charles and George are thinking of giving Bessie a 'very pretty sort of box to keep music in'; wishes they would give them the flying trunk or carpet Bessie mentioned. They will have to content themselves with meeting in dreams, though it seems [Empedocle] Gaglio has a dream-carpet which will take him into Bessie's brain; still, he does not have a lock of her hair so Bob has a start.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne. - Thanks Bob for the letters: the 'only new fact' is that their father 'behaved worse than [George] knew under pressure from Uncle Mark [Philips]"; will go through his narrative ["Sir George Otto Trevelyan: A Memoir"] and make any changes necessary; will of course not go into details; Aunt Annie [Philips] has approved what he has written so far. Much looking forward to his visit to the Shiffolds. Remembers in a postscript how their father would sit at Welcombe 'saying cheerfully "We shall all end in the workhouse" - and never thought it less'; the 'workhouse seems a bit nearer today' but they must hope.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Will send this letter to Florence as expects Elizabeth and Robert will leave Ravello today; sorry that they have not had good weather. Has been very busy this week visiting Cheyne Gardens: [George and Janet's new baby Mary] is very sweet and Janet is doing well; George was worried until it was over but now is cheerful. He and Sir George, and perhaps Charlie, are going to Cambridge next Friday to vote against compulsory Greek; they do not expect to succeed but there is 'a great rally on both sides'; it is said it would be carried if it depended on the residents. The Watts and Whistler exhibitions [at the Royal Academy and the New Gallery, Regent Street] are both 'most interesting collections', and there is a 'wonderful show of Oriental China in Bond Street'. Asks if Elizabeth and Robert will prefer to go straight home or stay the night in London; is anxious to see them again. It will be interesting for them to see the [new] house and the Enticknaps' baby. Sorry that Charles Booth is still so unwell; has not quite understood whether Mary and Imogen joined them. Glad Elizabeth is not going to Holland; thinks it would be too cold and damp. There is much illness about here; Uncle Harry has bronchitis, and Nora [Trevelyan?] a bad cold. They have decided to keep the old Broadwood piano in London, and want Elizabeth to choose a little one for Welcombe before Easter. Has heard no music, but they have been to a Bernard Shaw play ["John Bull's Other Island"]. Booa [Mary Prestwich] cheerful and looking forward to seeing Elizabeth; Janet much pleased with her letters. '"Mother" [possibly Florence Bell?] is very active and... good on such an occasion'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - Glad there is a duplicate [of the typescript of Bessie's translation of Robert Fruin's "The Siege and Relief of Leyden in 1574"]; will keep the copy he has and bring it to Northumberland. Is 'most enthusiastic' about it; [John] Motley does not seem to have known about 'the internal situation at politics inside Leyden', and the 'two accounts supplement each other splendidly'. [Pieter] Geyl has sent George his notes; thinks them 'very good, but incomplete'; has sent them back with a few small suggestions. Will write the preface after having seen Bessie at the end of August and Geyl at the end of September.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - The photographs [of Julian] are 'delightful'. They have been very anxious about Mary [who has suffered a miscarriage]; Dr Williams stayed two nights 'as there was danger of Haemerrage [sic] and then things would not come away entirely', but she is recovering now; it is very unfortunate and she hopes Mary 'will be more careful another time'. Is sure Elizabeth is 'not running the risks she has done'; hopes she is well and can confirm her news [that she is pregnant]. Hugo Bell has been visiting, and has seen [Donald] Tovey recently, who was 'very full of the opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]; glad Tovey is working hard on it. George plans to visit soon 'by way of a walk'. '[G]reatly excited about politics'; wishes the '[constitutional] crisis were over'. Asks if Margaret V[aughan] Williams would like to visit towards the end of Elizabeth's stay at Wallington.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Thanks Robert for his 'marks' [suggested corrections to "Sir George Otto Trevelyan: A Memoir"]. Originally enclosing a copy of some excerpts from their father's letters to Bob, asking for comments; intends to print them at the end of the memoir, before "Horace at Athens", if Bob does not object. Very glad that C.A. [Clifford Allen] is better; agrees with him that 'the PM [Ramsay MacDonald] is cutting the best and most dignified figure of the lot', though does not know wheter that will 'save our unfortunate country and world'; hope is necessary.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad that Elizabeth enjoyed the Petersfield Festival, and that Robert could be there some of the time; nice for her to meet 'Miss Davies & other musical people'. Will be 'very interesting at Dorking' [the Leith Hill Music Festival?]; asks to hear how things go. Amused to think of Elizabeth and Robert driving a horse; expects the one chosen was very safe. Busy with the meetings for the next three days, and expects to be very hot: hopes 'the debates will not be very excited!'. Charles and Mary have been away, but she has seen G[eorge], J[anet], and 'Little M[ary]'; they are soon going to the country, though have not been able to let their house. They say the review [of "The Birth of Parsival"?] and feared Robert would be 'vexed'; it does though 'speak very respectfully of him as a writer' and only criticises the subject. Longman [the publisher] is advertising it well, also for America. A postscript confirms they will put Elizabeth up on the 16th.

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