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Letter from Arthur Schuster to A. S. Eddington

Transcript

Victoria Park, Manchester
Novr 9. 1909

Dear Mr Eddington,

May I ask you—in confidence—whether you consider yourself definitely fixed to “Astronomy” or whether you would at all consider a return to Physics as possible.—I am not at liberty to go into details but the question arises whether in case a chair of Theoretical Physics were founded here or elsewhere and suitable conditions were offered you would be prepared to accept the chair.—Also in that case it might help matters if you wd let me know what conditions you would consider acceptable.

You may take it for granted that the duties wd leave you plenty of time for private work and that nothing wd prevent you continuing to prosecute the line of research on which you have entered with such success

I remain
Yours sincerely
Arthur Schuster.

Letter from Lord Acton to Nora Sidgwick

Writes on the death of Henry Sidgwick, and expresses his, Lady Acton's and others' sympathies on her 'dreadful loss'. Declares that he has lost 'the best of friends and colleagues...' Refers to the sympathy and admiration he felt for Henry in relation the manner in which he bore his illness. Reports that [Andrew?] Forsyth spent an hour discussing things with Sidgwick at Jebb's, 'and had no idea till long after that anything was wrong.' States that they were not aware of the gravity of the situation until three weeks earlier, when he met Nora with Arthur J. Balfour.

Acton, John Emerich Edward Dalberg (1834-1902) 1st Baron Acton, historian

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Thinks that his illness was due to something he ate. Declares that he enjoyed his visit to [London], and sent an account of the visit to [ ]. Reports that Mr Wheatley [his godfather] was very kind to the. Declares that he would like to see Miss Green [his former governess] if his mother can induce her to stay until he [and his brother William] come home. Refers to his mother's advice about his chess playing and assures her that he has not played more that five games 'since the beginning of the quarter...' Asks her to buy something for [his friend] Harry James out of his money. Explains how they were 'got into the 2nd class in German', and in relation to the play declares that they do not have to translate it themselves. Sends his love to all at home, 'including Elizabeth [Cooper]'.

Letter from Lady Victoria Welby-Gregory to Nora Sidgwick

States that 'having so long and so eagerly looked out for any request for "letters"' the appearance of a notice in Macmillan's Magazine of the impending appearance of a memoir with Henry Sidgwick's letters has come as somewhat of a shock to her. Begs Nora's forgiveness if she has sent any of the enclosed letters [105/45/2-5], but Miss C[arter] does not remember copying them. If she ever tries 'to give some sketch of the inception' of her work on "Significs" she would certainly have to refer to Henry 'as being one of its first and greatest promoters'. Refers to the accompanying letters, and also to the assistance Henry gave her in conversation on the matter. She will be sorry if none of the letters appeared in the memoir. She has often lately longed to tell Henry 'of the abounding signs that the young world is beginning to see...that the key to one of the greatest of the human positions has been lost and must be found'; predicts that she will not live to see the result of such finding, but that it is enough to be allowed to help 'even so little or badly towards it'. Adds that there are many more short letters, but that they are chiefly about dates or places etc.

Accompanied by envelope, addressed to Nora Sidgwick at Newnham College, with MS notes in Nora's hand: 'Lady Welby/Copies of letters from Henry/Received too late to be considered for Memoir'.

Letter from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick.

Returns the obituary of Henry Sidgwick [included: 106/1B], which he describes as 'a very extraordinary production, and yet touching.' Supposes that 'her feeling pressed for utterance and she [Meta Benfey] thought it was so long ago that it did not matter'. Has translated the exordium and sent it to Minnie; thinks that he had said to Nora the previous night that he would send the translation of the Benfey article to her, but failed to send it, and so sent it to Minnie. With envelope addressed to Nora Sidgwick, postmarked 28 Nov 1906

Sidgwick, Arthur (1840–1920), educationist and classical scholar

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