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PETH/8/8 · Unidad documental simple · 31 Oct.-1 Nov. 1914
Parte de Pethick-Lawrence Papers

Women’s Cosmopolitan Club, 133 East 40th Street (New York).—Has met Mrs Wells and has been asked to write an article for Harper’s. A preliminary committee has been set up to promote an ‘international commonwealth’. Suggests Fred should come to the States when his book is finished.

PETH/8/68 · Unidad documental simple · 18 Mar. 1946
Parte de Pethick-Lawrence Papers

Transcript

March 18. 1946
11 Old Square, Lincoln’s Inn, W.C.2

My own Beloved.

You are packing, & I have come into my room to rest and not hamper you. For many days I have had no thought, no life (except on the surface) apart from you & your great mission. {1} I have not put what I feel into words, because the high adventure, upon which you are starting out, is too important to allow any place for personal consideration, but you will know how my love & my thought & my prayer will be with you every hour of the day. That is what was expressed in the little charm or keepsake I have given to bear you company. I have very deep roots in you as you have in me. We share our deepest attitude to life & being. To some extent at any rate, like the Buddhas in Tibet, we have found our being outside the wheel of Birth & Death. Outside or inside, we know that we are part of the Cosmic whole, and to the extent of our realization, are beyond anxiety or fear. If not only we two, but all three involved in the great enterprise of reconciliation can live, even if only for a few minutes every day, in this consciousness, the “Miracle” may happen. I have always felt that the marvelous† outpouring of what we call the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, was due (in part at any rate,) to the sudden consciousness of oneness generated by the vigil together, and to the realization of what St. Paul in his great chapter in Corinthians, {2} calls “Charity”—Understanding—Fellowship—oneness—so that all spoke in language understood of every tribe & nation.

I rejoice greatly in the letter signed by the Archbishop of Canterbury & others. It is what I have wanted & wished for, but did not expect. I believe it will deeply impress many Indian leaders, whether they admit it or not. At any rate you & your colleagues are going with the ardent goodwill of the whole of the country. This realization will bear you up as on eagles wings {3}.

When I leave the Drome {4} & return here, I expect a visit from Miss Mulock (“Baby”) {5} and on Wednesday {6} Naomi is coming to see me. On Thursday unless we are lucky enough to get theatre ticke[t]s for a Ruth Draper Impersonations†—I shall go to see Mai Mai. On Friday we shall all return to Fourways. And I hope & intend to spend the whole of the next week organizing the garden. On Monday April 1st I have seats for May & myself at an Indian Ballet, Sakuntala. {7} On April 2nd the Sculptor Huxley Jones & his wife are coming to tea. They are from Aberdeen & are bringing to London his clay figure that impressed us all in Edinburgh, “the Common Soldier”, hoping it will be accepted for the Royal Academy Show.

During the week at Fourways, I hope to take Grant Watson in the car to call on the Robert Trevelyans. And all the time until next Saturday, one part of me will be flying flying—or sharing your experience in Tunis or elsewhere. And a part of you will be with me, because there will not be the urgent call on your attention which will follow, after next Sunday. May we celebrate our May 26th in thankfulness & joy together, looking back to that memorable day 45 years ago. With my hearts love & blessing

Your own.

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{1} The Cabinet Mission to India.

{2} 1 Corinthians xiii.

{3} Cf. Isaiah xl. 31.

{4} Hurn aerodrome.

{5} Emily Maud Mulock? Cf. PETH 4/161.

{6} 20th.

{7} Full stop supplied.

† Sic.

PETH/8/122 · Unidad documental simple · 30 Sept. 1922
Parte de Pethick-Lawrence Papers

84 Merrion Square, Dublin.—Is happy for his name to be used to help obtain passports for Rudolf Steiner and his companions. Is depressed by the present condition of Ireland. Refers to his forthcoming book, The Interpreters.

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Transcript

84 Merrion Sq | Dublin
30 Sept 22

My dear Mrs Pethick Lawrence

Your letter dated 22nd arrived this morning. In addition to our other national troubles we had a national postal strike which concluded today & brought me your letter. I know little or nothing about Dr Rudolf Steiner. Of course I know his name but little beyond that except I once started to read a book on the Threefold State & could not relate it to anything in my own country & so did not study it carefully. I have no knowledge of his mystical books, {1} though friends of mine have spoken to me about them. I read hardly any mystical literature except the Sacred Books. So you see I cannot lend any authority to your invitation to Dr Steiner so far as authority arises from knowledge of his ideas. But if you think it could help to ease the obtaining of passports or the like for Dr Steiners company by all means append my name to the others. We are all very depressed here. I think Ireland will come right in about ten years but just now it is very melancholy being here & seeing the wreck of movements one spent ones life in building up. My wife is fairly well. The new book “The Interpreters” will not I think be published until a little before Christmas or perhaps next spring. It has to be set up in USA as well as in England, {1} and I do not know when the American printers will have it ready. With kind regards

Yours sincerely
A.E.

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{1} Comma substituted for a full stop.

PETH/8/124 · Unidad documental simple · 4 July 1938
Parte de Pethick-Lawrence Papers

52 Tavistock Square, W.C.1.—Thanks her for her comments on Three Guineas, and expresses admiration for the Pethick-Lawrences’ work for the women’s movement.

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Transcript

52 Tavistock Square, W.C.1
4th July 38

Dear Mrs Pethick Lawrence,

I have just got back from Scotland, & found your letter. None that I have had about Three Guineas has given me such pleasure. I was haunted by the fear that those who had a right to judge would think me impertinent—I have had so little experience myself. But no one has more right to judge than you have, & if the book seems to you useful I am greatly relieved. To me, the facts seemed so obvious that I wondered that they had not been stated before. Whether stating them does any good, I don’t know, but it was the only thing I could do, & silence had become intolerable to me.

May I take this chance of saying how greatly, when I was reading about the womens movement, I admired the work that you & your husband did for it? A wish not to mention the living—perhaps a foolish wish—made me quote the dead—otherwise I should have liked to express my admiration in writing.

I am glad you liked the pictures. They have educed, {1} I am pleased to find, rage in many quarters.

Thank you again for writing.

Yours sincerely
Virginia Woolf

Yes—the cutting you send is very interesting. May I hoard it along with other such facts?

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{1} This word is indistinct.