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Butler, Henry Montagu (1833-1918), college head
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Letter from H. Montagu Butler to Robert Sinker

Transcript

Trinity Lodge, Cambridge
March 10th 1891.

My dear Librarian,

I have the pleasure of sending you, in a truly splendid dress, the Autograph Score of Doctor Hubert Parry’s “Blest Pair of Sirens.”

I am to-day writing to thank him for his generous gift, which was formally accepted by the Council last Friday {1}.

The letters of Doctor Parry and Professor Stanford {2}, which I enclose, will, I trust, be preserved.

Believe me to be
Most truly yours
H. Montagu Butler

—————

{1} 6 Mar.

{2} The other two letters pasted into this volume.

Letter from C. V. Stanford to H. Montagu Butler

Transcript

10 Harvey Road | Cambridge
March 2. 1891

My dear Master,

I have the pleasure to send you with this the original autograph score of Hubert Parry’s ‘Blest pair of Syrens,’ which he wishes to present to the College for the Library. It struck me some time ago that as the College possessed the Manuscript of the poem, {1} it would be of interest & of value to them to possess also the original of the magnificent musical setting. Parry was, as is his nature, most unwilling at first to do anything which looked (as he put it) so “bumptious,” but I quieted his qualms on that point.

I send you herewith a letter {2} he wrote to me asking me to forward the score to the Council, & which, as it is really addressed to them altho’ through my mediation, I should be glad, if they wish, to leave in their hands.

Believe me, my dear Master,
yrs very truly
C V Stanford

—————

{1} R.3.4.

{2} Parry’s letter of 28 Feb., also pasted into this volume.

Letter from H M Butler to G K M Butler

G K M Butler would have been elected a Fellow if there had been four vacancies in stead of three, F A Simpson particularly pleased with his performance in history, electors think him safe for the following year, Nevile Butler working at the Foreign Office.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announced that he has arrived in Cannes 'after a somewhat trying journey': the worst part being the Dover to Calais crossing which he found so rough that he was afraid to subsequently take the night train to Avignon 'for fear of being regularly knocked up'. Was glad to instead spend a morning in Paris, a town he 'love[s] above all towns', where he suffered the effects of a very cold North Wind. Refers to the tradition of selling étrennes [new year's gifts], which he does not wish to 'transplant' to Britain; it is bad enough having to give presents to friends when they marry. Reports that he spent some hours in the Louvre, and found that his feeling for Greuze had grown.

Travelled on to Avignon that night, where he encountered a snow-storm. Remarks that the Palace of the Popes 'looks much more like a great barrack which it now is than like a palace'. He stayed in Marseilles on Wednesday night, and the next morning saw the Mediterranean for the first time. Complains that it has rained every day since he arrived. Reports that Symonds 'does not look at all well, but says he is better', and has sprained an ankle. Mentions that Montagu Butler is there, and that he intends to see him soon and hopes to hear about Haileybury and A G Butler. Reports that [Roden] Noel 'left a wideawake' with them, and asks her to send it to him in London. Asks her to keep carefully any letters about his room or else [ ] belonging to him that she may find. Reports that he had 'a melancholy business at Hastings dividing the library [of his friend Cowell, who died the previous month]'; he could not take all the books and those he had taken will 'oblige him to line [his] room with bookcases'. Remarks that this 'complete break-up, extinction of a family is very sad.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announced that he has decided to come to Rugby the week after the following week, instead of the following Thursday, as he had originally intended. States that he wishes to dine with his editor at Harrow on the following Saturday and see his friends there. Reports that Montagu Butler has been seriously ill, but is getting better. Is very sorry to hear about Mary, and asks for a better account to be sent as soon as she can. Also regrets to read her report of William, and states that he has no time to go and see him.

Regrets that he is not able to work as hard as he should like. Declares that he should have given himself a longer complete holiday during that long vacation. Reports on the work he has done. Thought that he 'should have got further towards explaining Spiritualism, one way or another'; however, 'it gives life an additional interest having a problem of such magnitude still to solve'. Asks his mother's opinion on the Bishop's address, and remarks that he thought it was 'exceedingly well composed on the whole'. Professes to be becoming more interested in ecclesiastical matters from reading English history. Sends his love to Mary and Edward.

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