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PETH/8/10 · Pièce · 2 Nov. 1914
Fait partie de Pethick-Lawrence Papers

Women’s Cosmopolitan Club, 133 East 40th Street (New York).—Sends news of her activities in the United States.

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Transcript

Circular letter.

Women’s Cosmopolitan Club, 133 East 40th Street

Nov. 2.

Well! Since I landed at New York on Monday a week ago, I have not had a dull minute. I’ve really been thrilled all the time. So far, I have not begun to sort up my impressions at all—I am much too taken up with receiving them.

This morning I was invited to attend the Children’s Court. {1} Judge Hoyt is the permanent Acting Judge in this Court. He is the grandson of Chase, {2} who was a Member of Lincoln’s Cabinet, a man, thirty-five years of age—Conservative in politics but in this matter of reform an enthusiast. He has been educated to his present position by Miss Doty a solicitor & barrister who at present holds an official position as one of the Prison Commissioners. Arriving at the Court, seats were placed for us beside Judge Hoyt who explained the cases to us & handed us the wonderful dossiers supplied with each little offender—giving all details as to parents, character of home, school-record—health record—standard of living & every conceivable fact to be ascertained with regard to the child, his conditions & surroundings.

The Judge has a personal talk to each child brought before him & encourages the child to talk to him & to confess his fault. {1} If confessed, he can deal with the matter without any formality. If the offence is denied, the procedure of a trial with witnesses has to be gone through—but it is very informal—the group stands right in front of the Judge—face to face—& there are no police to be seen, unless it is the officer who has arrested the culprit, then he comes up to give his evidence like anybody else & goes away again as soon as his witness is ended. The Parents of the child stand just within call—and the Probation Officers who have first won the confidence of the children, stand beside them to encourage them or to confer with the Judge.

There are 26 Probation Officers attached to the Court, besides missionaries of very denomination—there is also a Guild of “Big Brothers” which the Judge himself has founded—each Big Brother taking voluntary friendly charge of some wayward little brother & trying to pull him through the critical period of his life.

Every child is put under probation for a certain number of months, only in very hopeless cases is he (or she) sent to a Reformatory—as the Judge holds that almost any sort of a home is better for a child than a semi penal institution. The parents are visited & helped by sympathy & advice. About 10,000 children pass through this Court per annum & the greater percentage of these turn out well under the system. A new Children’s Court is now being built—here the Judge’s bench is begin done away with entirely, & he will see every case alone—in conference with probation officers, parents etc. Waiting rooms are large airy & comfortable & a special waiting room is set aside for Mothers with babies. We saw 7 cases dealt with in an hour & a half. Most of these were remanded—or were being dealt with at a a second or third hearing after being thoroughly investigated in the meanwhile.

In one case a little boy was arrested by the police intolerantly & in an ill judged way. The small boy gave his version of the story to the Judge, obviously sincerely & truthfully, & his word was taken & the boy was discharged quite kindly & left the Court. Judge Hoyt is very proud of the record of the Court for the last four years. Speaking to Miss Doty he said. We have done this thing between us. “You educated me & I have educated the Court.” {1}

He would like to have Miss Doty as Assistant Judge to deal especially with the girls. But that would need a Bill being passed in the Legislature, as Women Judges are not yet admitted into the scheme in New York State. There is some hope of such a Bill being passed before very long.

We returned to lunch with Miss Doty & had a most thrilling talk. Before taking up the duties of Prison Commissioner—Miss Doty went to prison for a week as an ordinary criminal. No one knew of her identity except the Head Commissioner who sent her to Sing Sing Prison under the escort of two police officers. Some of her stories of prisoners were simply wonderful. One about a man who was executed for a murder, (in her opinion the man was innocent of the charge) was the most touching I ever heard. They made a compact together to use his story to help save “the kids” & he was writing this story for her up to the very moment that he was taken from his cell for execution. Many other stories she told us till we had to tear ourselves away to keep the next appointment. Tomorrow is the anniversary of her voluntary imprisonment & she is dining with us & we are going together afterwards to the Night Courts, to see how New York attempts to deal with its women prostitutes.

Subsequently today I had an interview with Miss Mullholland who is trying to get a Bill introduced in the Legislature to alter the law that deprives American women of citizenship upon their marriage with aliens. This she thinks will be taken up & passed owing to the women’s votes in the Western States.

Tomorrow the Elections will take place & we shall know how many more Suffrage States are to be added to the record.

This letter only deals with a few hours out of one day. And every day is full.

My own work is going on all the time too. And when I am not listening & learning—I am talking & laying down the law!

I am going to Boston, Washington & Chicago shortly. At the latter place we are invited to stay with Miss Jane Addams at Hull House.

Now I must go. Love & greeting to the circle of dear friends at home.

Emmeline Pethick Lawrence

Yesterday was a typical day. Here is my Diary—

10. a.m. Interview—Mrs Chapman Catt
1.30 Luncheon[.] Miss Lewisohn & friends.
4.0 Tea. Miss Doty & a large circle.
6.30 Dinner. Miss Stanton Blatch.

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{1} Full stop supplied.

{2} Salmon Portland Chase (1808-1873). Judge Hoyt was the son of Chase’s youngest daughter, Janet, known as ‘Nettie’.

PETH/8/12 · Pièce · 5 Nov. 1914
Fait partie de Pethick-Lawrence Papers

Women’s Cosmopolitan Club, 133 East 40th Street (New York).—Sends a circular letter and gives an account of her dinner with the Wells. Will arrange her future engagements herself, as Feakins has proved unsatisfactory. Refers to the political climate in America, and her own state of mind. Was unable to speak to Wells about Fred's book.

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Transcript

Women’s Cosmopolitan Club, 133 East 40th Street
Nov. 5

My Dearest. I enclose a circular letter giving a description of the way we spent Election night. I think the friends I enumerated before, might like to see it.

I dined last night with Mr & Mrs Wells. Several other people were present & we had a delightful evening. {1} Harrison Rhodes a play-writer was there & invited me to get on my hobby-horse & ride it, so charmingly & pressingly, that I could not refuse. He identified himself completely with my posi-tion. The others were so tremendously anti-German that they could not see anything further beyond crushing the Hohenzollern out of existence—(I mean I think this was really their position though they were very charming to me.) Mr Wells is a most delightful person—he “frankly adores” E. R. (as he said.) Harpers Magazine of which Mr Wells is Editor, is altogether different from Harpers Weekly to whom I gave an article yesterday. {1} H.W. is edited by Norman Hapgood whom I have met twice. Last night the Century wrote to me for an article. I dont know if I shall have time to get it written.

I haven’t seen or heard from Feakins for a week & he has got all my letters & communications. He has turned out most unsatisfactory. I am trying to get my arrangements back into my own hands now.

The weather is like August. {1} I am wearing the very lightest clothing I possess.

New York America is strangely Conservative & reactionary. on† the other hand there are great personalities that stand for progressive ideas.
The American that I have met & heard of so far is practically solid for the Allies—& chafing against the national attitude of newtrality†. The Press is solidly anti German.

I am enjoying myself very much—have more invitations than I can fit in, & every day his its full programme. I have not however very much hope of getting anything really done.

Every now & then a great longing rises in my throat for you & home, Peter, Mascot—the Common & the Midland {2} woods. But I think of the next thing then & bustle off. I haven’t had English letters since Sat. Now its Thursday & I am hoping to get a mail before I leave for Boston tomorrow. Great love

Ever your Patz

I had no chance yesterday of mentioning your book. I think if you want me to do anything definite in the matter, I had better see Mr Wells & speak to him about it, on my return to New York about 1st few days in December.

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{1} Full stop supplied.

{2} Reading uncertain.

PETH/8/76 · Pièce · 3 June 1946
Fait partie de Pethick-Lawrence Papers

Transcript

June 3. 1946

My Dearest,

Do not let the delay in your return, give you any idea that you are missing the English summer. May 12 was the last summer day we have had. April was like June. The last 3 weeks have been March, & still, day after day we have gales of wind & storms of rain—sometimes sleet & hail. I read in the Paper today that in June the barometer has been lower than any day since Christmas. Not that we have had much frost. We have a good crop of soft fruit & apples, though no pears or plums. The violent wind tosses the trees & plants, like a storm tosses the waves on the ocean, while the clouds darken the sky. I hope it will be better weather for the Victory Parade. {1} No doubt interest & enthusiasm will work up during the next 5 days, but so far I find no sentiment expressed except disillusion. Even leading articles & Churchill’s speech have to recognize & attempt to deal with public apathy. Guildford & other towns too have refused to co-operate. The public feel that it is an exhibition of futility & waste. London has been much disfigured & spoilt for Londoners. It is not a happy time, & the real tragedy is brought home to people like G. G. {2} who could get no bread on Saturday, because she was too late in going out for it, & no milk because of the strike.

I have had a cable from Madeleine that she is scheduled to arrive in Southampton Dock next Wednesday, June 6th. She will take the train from Southampton to Woking, & on to Guildford where I shall meet her with the car. She has a transitional visa, & can only remain a short time. Probably she will stay at Fourways over Whit Monday, & we shall all go to London on June 11 & 12. I have avoided London for some weeks. There is much to do & see to here. I am giving much attention to the garden, and the little staff here needs a good deal of handling.

I have had very few official invitations during your absence. {3} But I had one to meet F. M. {4} Smuts, and as I could not go, I wrote to salute him, and have had a charming personal reply in his own hand writing. I received a letter from Mrs Price Hughes yesterday, to tell me that she is constantly with us both in her thoughts. She is 93, & her writing is as good as ever. We had a very pleasant visit from Stuart & Ruth, though it rained hard all the time. There are 5 of your wild roses out today. I wish I could send you one. Farewell my darling. Keep well & serene, & enjoy the present moment. All here are well. May has arranged to spend a week with Dorothy to make room for Madeleine, should you have been able to get back. You remember we have booked rooms in Ventnor from June 24—July 8. May will stay with Tom & there will be a room for you at the week end or whenever you want it at my Guest House or at the Hotel near Trewartha. If the soft fruit ripens just then, Lydia will want to overlook the bottling, although she can show Violet & leave it to her after one or two experiments.

No food of any kind must be wasted.

And so again God be with thee.

Your own.
Patz

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The address printed on the writing-paper is 11 Old Square, Lincoln’s Inn, W.C.2, but the letter was clearly written at Fourways.

{1} The national Victory Parade on 8 June.

{2} Probably Gladys Groom.

{3} Full stop supplied.

{4} Field Marshal.

PETH/8/77 · Pièce · 5 June 1946
Fait partie de Pethick-Lawrence Papers

Fourways (Gomshall, Surrey).—May has gone to stay with Dorothy. Discusses the food shortage, the weather, and the garden. Is pleased that Lady Cripps is going to join Sir Stafford, and hopes that Pethick-Lawrence will be able to return with them.

(Letter-head of 11 Old Square.)

(Letter-head of 11 Old Square.)