Showing 334 results

Archival description
Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
Print preview View:

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Perfect recent weather; has done 'a fair lot of work' and thinks he is 'well started' on his new play about 'a man who comes back from the Crusades and finds his enemy in occupation of his castle'. [C.P] Scott, editor of the "Manchester Guardian", has asked him to send an account of the landslip disaster [at the Cappuccini hotel]; if Scott prints his letter he will show it her, as his 'first and perhaps... last attempt at journalism'. The accounts of the landslip in the papers are 'greatly exaggerated'; Bessie need not worry about him. Once read a review of [Kenneth Grahame's] "The Golden Age" by Swinburne, 'with more than his usual extravagance of praise'; was rather disappointed when he read some of it soon after. Fry's sister Isabel has written 'a somewhat similar book, but with no pretentions', which he thinks is worth 'twenty golden ages'; it is called "Unitiated" and he will get it for Bessie to read; Isabel Fry is very nice, and a little like Bessie in temperament. Will lend her [Stephen Philips'] "Paolo and Francesca"; does not think much of it. Is too lazy to copy out verses, as he promised. Agrees that it is wonderful to think of going out for dinner together; not that either of them do that much, but in moderation it is very good, and he has never dined out enough for the 'novelty of it to be spoilt' as it is for her uncle. Teases her about her dreams. Is sure with her uncle and Lord Reay's advice they will be able to arrange their marriage properly; they should have as few formalities as possible, and avoid being married again in England if they can; would like the date to be as soon as possible, in June, but she should decide. Notes that this is the last letter he will send dated 1899, and '1900 will look awfully odd'.

Very interested by her description of her childhood; Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is certainly ' not the sort of person to have understood [Bessie] at all'; he had something of the same difficulty with Charles, who however tried to be sympathetic and a good brother to him; Charles 'had a sterner and more orderly temperament' and Bob 'the more haphazard one'. George is 'a sort of cross' between the two, but with much more intellect than Charles. Encloses a letter from Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan]; knew she had taken a fancy to Bessie; 'her staccato style is admirably expressive. She does it in conversation often'. Had said in his letter that his parents might visit Sicily next winter and she might possibly see him with them and Bessie next year. Has nearly finished reading [Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant"; thinks it 'a most remarkable novel' though it does drag in places. Calls the muses her 'real rivals, my dear nine mistresses'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello. - There is not sufficient paper in the hotel to answer her long letter as it deserves. Strange that he is not inspired to write Bessie love-poetry, but says he is 'not good at putting difficult and elaborate and wonderful thoughts into verse', which would be needed; will try one day. Sorry that Gredel [Guije] failed. Since he sometimes misses out words in his letters, Bessie need never be shocked by his 'wicked opinions' but can add 'nots' when she pleases and 'convert the sense to please [her] fancy'. Glad she is re-reading [Joseph Henry Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant". Sends her kisses "blown through the ether like waves of light or electricity'. Continues the letter next morning, copying out an extract about Shorthouse from a piece of paper in Mrs Reid's book an extract from a letter from Isabel Balfour; this recalls what his brother [George?] has heard about Shorthouse. The book reminds Bob of Pater's "Marius the Epicurean"; thinks one must have influenced the other; also thinks "Marius" the better book on the whole. Asks his waiter to settle their dispute about Italian grammar, which he does in Bob's favour. Returns to the letter in the afternoon: old Palumbo died this morning, and since his wife did not want Bob to leave, he is staying in a separate part of the house where he is 'quite out of the way'. News has just come that the Cappuccini hotel at Amalfi 'has subsided on a great part of it' and some people have been killed. Writes again in the evening having gone to see the landslip, which was as bad as the rumours; seven or eight people died, and 'part of the end of the hotel had gone'. The people say it is St. Francis' doing, "angry because his monastery had been put to base uses". Had never been to Amalfi before, though this is his third visit; not much to see 'except the people and the beggars', and the Cathedral is 'spoilt by restoring'. Palumbo was dying about the same time as the landslip, and the proprietor of the Cappuccini, a friend, was here comforting Madame Palumbo when the news about the hotel came. 'They say he almost fainted... [and] will probably be ruined, as no one will dare come to his hotel now'. Bob exerted himself greatly on the journey down to Amalfi and back and 'sweeted (in Grandmont language' despite the bitter cold.

Originally enclosing a 'charming letter from [Eddie] Marsh'; his 'first Cambridge friend' who works in the Colonial office 'though, like many there, he does not like the war'; gives a brief character sketch. Has also heard from [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson. Has not heard from [Bernard] Berenson, but has from [Mary] Costelloe, whom he just asked Berenson to tell; 'rather annoying', as he 'care[s] for Berenson very much, and dislike Mrs C.', though it was a 'perfectly proper letter'. Is very troubled by [Lina] Duff Gordon's letter: her wish for his happiness is 'unmistakeably sincere', as she always is, but her reply to his wish for them to remain as good friends is that since he told her nothing about this when he saw her 'constantly' in London last October, things can never be quite the same. It would have been very difficult to tell her, but feels that perhaps he should have done, not because she was an 'intimate friend' - the only one of his friends he told, 'for special reasons', was Fry - but because Mrs Costelloe had been spreading rumours that she was in love with him. Perhaps this was true, and he should have realised, although he does not think he gave her reason to believe he was in love with her; it is possible that Mrs Costelloe has stirred up trouble, as 'she has a great influence over Miss D. G.' and he believes her 'really to be a bad woman, though with many good qualities'. Is going to see Palumbo's funeral start for Naples. Writes again in the evening, after writing at 'my cliff, the Cembrone [Cimbrone]'. Quotes from a letter from Tom Moore: Moore thinks he will 'make a good husband' but spoil all his children. Has received Bessie's next letter, but not the photographs. He can skate, but not very well. Does not think Buller's defeat will make much difference to British attitudes to the [Second Boer] war; discussion of the war; does not think it would be good if all of South Africa were governed by the Dutch, would not object to 'an independent Dutch South Africa if it were well governed, and the natives treated properly' which currently happens in the Cape but not in the Transvaal. Methuen and probably Buller are not equal to the people against them, but this does not mean the English have fought badly; however, she need not worry that he is 'becoming Jingo'. Sorry Bessie has missed Tonina [van Riemsdijk]'s violin; when one good enough becomes available, will get it for her. They must visit Ravello together; Madame asked if they would come here on their honeymoon, which they will have to discuss; she intends to keep the hotel for some years at least.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi. - Has received the "Descent of the Primates" from Professor [Ambrosius] Hubrecht and found it very interesting; a long time since he read Darwin and 'tried to imagine [his] hairy, long-eard, tail-bearing, tree-haunting ancestors' and the paper has 'quite revived' the old fascination; never thought the hedgehog was 'so comparatively near a relation'. He and [Roger] Fry used to have one in London to kill black-beetles, which they called Hochi-Weechi, the Romany for hedgehog. Obviously Hubrecht's work is 'of great importance and value'. Had forgotten to send him the address of his own spectacle shop, and will do so when he writes to thank him. Had also forgotten to tell Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan; about their engagement]; will write at once. Hopes Gredel [Guije] gets through [her exam].

Continues the letter next day. Has got on 'fairly well' with his play recently; the sirocco is blowing today so he cannot do much except copy out what he has done so far, translate some Sophocles, and deal with correspondence. Old Palumbo is about the same; his wife does not want Bob to go unless absolutely necessary. Has not yet had a letter, or rings from which to choose one for her, from the Frys, but has written to them. Has had a 'charming' letter from Tommy Phelps [17/156], whom he calls 'almost my eldest friend' and had jokingly warned him against Dutch ladies when he would not tell him why he was going to Holland again so soon; it was also Phelps who originated the Vondel / fondle pun. Also returns C [Charles Trevelyan?]'s letter. Copies out some lines from "Troilus and Cressida", which he discusses briefly.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso Amalfi. - Corrects Bessie's Italian for his address. Details of post times. The weather continues to be bad so he has been reading, writing letters, and finishing copying out [Thomas Sturge Moore's] "Danaë". Thanks her for sending on the "Chronicle". Has written for the "Manchester Guardian", as he agrees with it about the [Second Boer] War; its editor [C.P.] Scott was here when he arrived, and he had a long talk with him about the war. The "Guardian" is 'almost the best paper in England, being cosmopolitan'; is encouraged that Scott says he has 'kept most of his public, in spite of his attitude to the war', and that opposition to their policy led to the resignation of the "Chronicle's" editors, rather than public opinion. Hopes Bessie's visit to the dentist went well. Discussion of the lack of interest in romantic love in Sophocles and its treatment by the other ancient tragedians; contrasts this with the way 'almost all the great modern dramatis, Shakespear [sic], Racine, Molière, de Vega etc. fetch their subjects from Venus' archives'. Continues the letter later, after 'scribbling off a severe commentary on some of the obscurities in Moore's "Danaë"' and reading the first chapters of [Joseph Henry Shorthouse's] "John Inglesant", which Mrs Reid lent him this afternoon. Has told her about Bessie and she took a great interest; she is 'a dear old lady, and very kind' to him. Improvises a poem about being a black beetle crawling under Bessie's door to give her kisses.

Returns to the letter next evening; has been outside most of the day, spending the morning in Mrs Reid's garden, though not really able to work, and walking in the afternoon. Hopes to start work in a day or two on another play, not the one he showed Bessie. Has begun his commentary on Moore's "Danaë," but it will take him hours. Tells her to show the photographs his mother sent her to her uncle and aunt. Is touched by what she says about trusting him. Hopes that [Ambrose Hubrecht's] whale 'has been successfully dissected'; disappointed to hear 'he is not going to Utrecht whole, to be stuffed, or bottled.'

Continues the letter next day. Has been reading Chaucer and 'commenting on Danaë's little faults'. Perhaps exaggerated when he said 'modern art scarcely seemed to exist at all', but does feel that modern art is 'on the wrong lines', though 'men like Degas and Puvis de Chavannes and Whistler, and even often Watts and Burne Jones, have done great things'. Would be wrong to persuade himself that bad art was good, and there are times when 'circumstances have made great art difficult or impossible', such as literature in the middle ages. Does not think the Frys' attitude to art is exclusive; they may well be in music, but they know less about that.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill-House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - They seem to be in similar circumstances this week: she has been helping to clean her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht]'s big bookcases; the charwoman who helped her 'was amusing enough' and made some 'delightfully naïve remarks' about the books. Elizabeth sometime lends books for her or her boys to read. Last Monday they moved to the Hague; the three summers they have spent at Ede seem to have passed very quickly, thinks they were 'the happiest & most interesting' parts of her life so far so she has become attached to the place and 'even to the ugly house' and is sad to think of the new 'unsympathetic' owner changing it, though he can do little to the woods and moors. Is going to spend a few days at Almelo with an old married friend whom she has not seen for some time; she is very musical and her husband seems to be a good pianist; also Marie [Hubrecht's] American friend Maud Howard is coming to stay tomorrow and she is 'not over anxious to see much of her'. Marie is then going to spend the winter in Florence though, like Maud Howard, she is a little vague about her plans.

Has changed her mind about 'forcing circumstances' and now thinks it would be good to see Bob again; suggests he comes over to the Hague next month, on the pretext of doing some work such as a translation of [Joost van] Vondel with which she could help, to make it seem less strange to her uncle and aunt; would have to ask him to stay at a hotel unless her uncle invites him to stay, and knows all this will give him trouble. He must write and tell her sincerely what he thinks. She has discussed the plan with Bramine [Hubrecht] who reassured her there was nothing wrong with it. Gives the address of her friend at Almelo, Mrs Salomonson Asser.

Has just seen a portrait of Bob's father 'on an old Financial Reform Almanack'; remarks on his 'charming eyes'. Hopes Bob is enjoying himself bringing 'dry bones' to live. Asks if he went to the concerts [given by Julius Engelbert Röntgen and Johannes Messchaert] and appreciated the singer. Is reading the Brownings' letters again, which are charming but get terribly sentimental. The [Second Boer] war is indeed horrible; asks if there are reasonable views on its duration and 'what the end can be'; asks whether there are as many 'contradictory muddling telegrams' in British newspapers as in Dutch ones; glad that there are 'so many rightly thinking English', but they are still a minority. The Grandmonts are at Florence, but unfortunately will have left by the time the Frys arrive. Very kind of Trevelyan to transcribe some of his verses for her; looks forward to reading them though she says she is a 'highly unpoetical being'. Signs herself 'Bessie'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel Biscione & Bellevue, Piazza Fontana No 8 e 10, Milan. - His itinerary for the journey to Ravello, including 'the Cava of the Browning letters'. [Roger] Fry is much better, and he and his wife start tonight for England. Saw another fine private art collection this afternoon, including a fine Correggio (not usually an artist he likes), and a Titian or Giorgione of 'a lady rather like Mrs [Mary] Costelloe only finer'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel Biscione, Piazza Fontana, Milano. - Very sorry that she has suffered as she has; it is true that she does not have 'new scenes' and 'interesting and exciting work' as he has, but she must not be made unhappy by their separation; his feeling towards her will not lessen, though he supposes he may love her 'intellectual or rather... spiritual nature more' when they are apart, rather than her 'immediate physical or even psychological personality'; says she must try and let him 'haunt [her] pleasantly'. Is touched that she cried for him; there is no shame in doing so. The Frys are sending some rings to Ravello for him to choose from, and he will send her one; they are leaving tomorrow if Fry is well enough, as he is in bed with a cold. Went to the Brera yesterday and saw many wonderful things; again was unimpressed with the Luinis; then they saw two other private collections, one of which included a Bellini Madonna. Fry has seen his 'Indian poem and the play about Antioch' and was encouraging about the play; thought the poem 'very good in places, but not real enough, psychologically' as [Thomas Sturge?] Moore also said. Thinks they are probably right; will be glad to get working again. The Frys wanted to find a name for Bessie; as her name includes 'des Amorie' they tried 'Amoretti or Amoretta', but now Mrs Fry has invented 'Amica', short for 'Amica di Trevi', in the same way as they and 'other connoisseurs [primarily Bernard Berenson]' have identified a painter they call 'Amico di Sandro [Botticelli]'. Asks how she likes it; he will continue to call her 'Bessie'. Wrote to her aunt this morning. Had a 'charming letter from [John] MacTaggart' which he will forward after replying. Encloses a letter [perhaps 17/134] from his cousins the Booths, 'very nice people, cousins of the Fletchers'. His friends have all been very kind, as he thinks hers have too; glad she has Jeanne Salomonson to keep her company, who is a 'sweet creature'. Thoughts on 'human misery' occasioned by her visit to the hospital.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel Biscione, Piazza Fontana, Milano. - Arrived at Milan yesterday afternoon; found the Frys at this hotel so also changed, but his letters will be sent on from the Suisse. Apologises for not writing that evening. The Frys are very well, and are going out with him now to see pictures and churches; he will write properly this evening. Hopes she does not miss him too much; agrees that they have had 'a wonderful time together' and that it is harder for her than for him since at least he is travelling; promises not to forget her.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel Biscione, Piazza Fontana, Milano. - Bessie will have received his letter apologising for not writing on his arrival. Has had a 'wonderful' day, seeing several churches, Leonardo's "Last Supper", then the castle which has only recently been opened and was new to [the Frys]; it is 'the most overwhelming building' in Italy, at least in size and often in beauty; much of it is by Bramante and there are fine sculptures and remnants of frescos to be seen; helps one see why Leonardo came to Milan, which otherwise seems 'rather a dull place'. They then went to a private collection of good pictures in 'splendid condition', cleaned by Cavenaghi; is now convinced he likes Italian art most of all, though he does like some Dutch painters; feels modern art 'scarcely exists at all'. Will see 'the more celebrated things' at the Brera tomorrow. Now feels that Luini is 'very third rate', and a 'watered down' Leonardo. Staying in Milan till the Frys go on Monday or Tuesday. She [Helen Fry] has not been well, except at Siena, but he has had a good time with them, and talked to them a lot about Bessie; if Bessie comes to England in the spring, as he hopes she will, the Frys want her to spend a few days at Dorking with them, from which she could see the Mill House. They will not be able to come to Holland on the way back; they have a fixed date to return by and 'she is not really well enough for visiting'. Confesses that he likes Italy more than northern countries, at least at this time of year. Will write to her aunt tomorrow. Has had a letter from his aunt [Viscountess] Knutsford and from [Frank?] Dugdale, which are pleasant but not worth quoting.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Will leave on the 12th, arriving some time in the morning of the 13th; will go on to Italy afterwards; his friend [Desmond] MacCarthy may join him at the Hague around the end of November and travel with him. Bessie seems to have been 'successful and tactful' and he will try to be as well. Intends to make their Vondel 'pretext a real one'; wants her to translate some of the plays besides "Lucifer", so that he is reading good plays (useful since he is trying to write them himself) and 'laying the foundations' for an attempt to learn Dutch; will get a grammar and dictionary, and asks her to get him a cheap edition of Vondel. Asks if there is anything she would like to learn in recompense, such as Latin grammar. Asks what the 'examination [he] may have to sustain' from her uncle is likely to cover: he can give reasons for wanting to study Vondel,. Discussion of hotels. Appreciates her aunt's 'rapier thrust of irony'; will certainly accompany them on walks whenever Bessie wishes. Asks if she would like him to bring her any books. Discussion of the war: still thinks it is a 'great mistake' on the part of the British, though doubts whether it would be good 'for themselves or for any one else' if the Boers were to win, which he does not think at all likely. Is angry with the Government and the country, but does not think it right to accuse the 'nation as a whole of wickedness and hypocrisy' as is being done on the continent; thinks the Boers were not giving British subjects a 'proper government or the proper securities for justice'; negotiations were not carried out properly, but does not think most of the country, or the Government (except for Chamberlain) actually want or wanted war. Thinks Bessie is probably right about the translation of 'du vulgaire' [in Ronsard's poem]. Bessie must not think that she is keeping him from work; expects to do little until he goes to Italy 'refreshed and invigorated' after seeing her. Thinks the Frys have changed their plans, but hopes to see them in Italy for a few days wherever they are.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is glad that Bessie thinks their plan [to meet] so easy and that he 'overrated the difficulties' on her side; still thinks it may be better for him to go on to Italy after seeing her, saving the expense and 'beastliness' of two crossings and making him more likely to catch the Frys at Siena. Has always been able to work at Ravello, and doubts he will do much until he goes abroad. She must decide when he should come, and for how long; would like not to start before 11 November as he has promised to play [rugby] football then, but 'even the Sacred Olympian Games must give way , if necessary'. Says that he hates 'romance, at least in real life', and would not like her to be a 'Juliett, even if it were possible'; discusses Rostand's play "Les Romanesques", in which two lovers are not satisfied until their fathers fake a Romeo and Juliet style quarrel; thinks it more perfect than "Cyrano [de Bergerac]". Has not read "La Samaritaine"; thinks he would not care for it, as "[w]hen a Frenchman gets hold of J[esus] C[hrist] he usually makes him ridiculous", though it is 'bound to be clever and amusing'; Sanger saw 'Sally B [Sarah Bernhardt]' in it. Of Rostand's tragedies, has only read "La Princesse Lontaine"; thinks it a better play than "Cyrano". General thoughts about Rostand's plays and characters; he is 'a very charming person, and though dreadfully French [not] offensively so'. Glad Bessie liked his poem 'about Nothing at all' [see 9/80]; questions her objection to his translation of a line in the Ronsard poem, since she knows French much better than he does. The 'Indian poem' is part of a long one of which he has written the beginning and the fragment he sent; is not satisfied with it at all. Explains the correct English use of "shall" and "will". Has just seen an evening paper with an account of the disaster at Ladysmith [during the Second Boer War]; thinks it is the worst reverse the British army have had this century; resembles 'certain events in the War of American Independence' and this war is 'nearly as foolish and unnecessary'. Discusses possible results. Bessie is right that his father has fine eyes; thinks she would like him; he is very like Bob, 'only with more virtues and common sense, and fewer absurdities'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Apologises for using 'lubberly thick English' paper. Came to London to hear [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen on Monday, but found he was ill and the concert off; hopes it is nothing serious. Went to hear [Hans] Richter conduct Tchaikowsky's 6th Symphony instead. Fears she may not have got the letter with his poetry last week, as he thinks he addressed it wrongly. Agrees that Bessie's proposal that he should come to see her again in the Netherlands [see 9/9] is indeed bold, but is very glad she has made it. On his side, the difficulties are small: he can easily conceal his visit, or let it be known that he is calling there on the way to Italy. Feels that the excuse she suggests of them translating Vondel together is very thin; true that he would like to read some with her, and that she could teach him German or 'even Dutch', though he does not feel ready to learn both at the same time; however, her family are still likely to see through this, 'especially if they were suspicious before'. Perhaps it would be better to be more honest with them; otherwise, would be willing not to go and see her at home at all, but for them to meet privately at his hotel and talk or go for walks. Realises that she will probably think this wrong, and her feelings must be 'paramount', though see it would be difficult and perhaps 'unwise' for her to take her uncle and aunt into her confidence. Will want 'horribly' to be with her all day, as he always does. She must decide what is best; expects her uncle will think he has come to see her whatever excuse they give. Promises to be 'quite reasonable, and prudent, though very much in love'. Must not read the Brownings' letters, or he will start writing 'too sentimentally'. Has had a 'rather nasty business looking after [Roger] Fry's affairs', his publisher [Oldmeadow] is 'swindling him' and he has had to write a long letter to Fry. Will give this letter to [Charles] Sanger to post as he is going out for a post; he may wonder 'who the lady with the long foreign name is' but will not tell him.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking - Begins the letter on his first night at the Mill House, an 'event of some importance'; describes the 'confusion' in the house, with most of his books still packed in their cases; has just undone two parcels of books from the Bohn library, a recent bargain purchase: sixty Bohns for seven pounds; puns on Ezekiel 37 and the 'valley of dry bones', though the books are not really too dry, and there are translations of Pushkin's tales and Hoffmann's "Serapion" which are quite new to him. Is going for a long walk of exploration this afternoon; hopes to reach the top of Leith Hill; must go and call on the [Paget?] Bowmans some day. Had an excellent game at Harrow last Thursday, just beating the School; [rugby] football is his 'chief... vanity'; they then forgot their injuries 'over the Headmaster's champagne', and he saw many old friends. A couple of days later, saw his greatest school-friend, just back from three years in India as a civil servant, 'a bit fat, but otherwise... not changed much'; does not believe 'nice people' do change much, at least until they 'begin to get senile'. George Moore believes most people 'soon begin to deteriorate', but he is a pessimist. Promises to send her some of his poetry next time. A pity the house at Doorn came to nothing; sympathises with Grandmont's exasperation at a wasted trip around the country. Has written to thank Paul [Hubrecht], who need not have returned his umbrella. Thinks he will get on well with his German when he begins in earnest. Thanks for the information from Grandmont about "Eulenspiegel", which he will share with Langley when they next meet. McTaggart is certainly 'a very interesting and original being, and perhaps the wittiest in Cambridge", though Bob does not think his philosophy sound; has not yet seen his Daisy. Understands her difficulty in talking with the Frys about their 'common friend, that wretched poet', but Fry said nice things about them all and Bessie in particular. Sorry to think of her 'wandering sadly round the country, like Jephthah's daughter' saying goodbye to all the places she knew; will try and write again soon since she is unhappy. Had no chance to show Bramine's sketches to his mother but will do this later; the war is a 'beastly business' but he is glad that 'more sensible people' than he at first though consider that it could have been avoided.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Apologises for not replying sooner; went to Cambridge on Saturday and found 'so much to do and talk about' that there was no time to write. Is going to Dorking tomorrow as his furniture is coming; the house should have been ready a week ago. Will dine with his mother that evening, then on Thursday he is going to Harrow to play [rugby] football against the school on Founders' Day; afterwards will dine at the Headmasters' and go to a 'smoking concert'; the day after that he will dine at his father's club. Will only then really begin the solitude of his 'rural retreat' and is looking forward to 'a quiet and industrious time at last'. Glad Bessie liked the Frys and they got on well with her uncle; not surprised she found 'a certain difficulty in becoming intimate with them', since he thinks Fry's mind is very different to hers and that he is not always quick to adapt himself, while Helen Fry is not like that but is often 'rather diplomatic in conversation until she knows all about a person'; this is not insincerity, as some people think. Heard from them today [see 4/27]; they enjoyed their visit, and Fry seems to have taken 'tremendously' to her uncle and aunt. Went to Highgate last week to see Tom [Sturge] Moore the poet, who read two new poems; criticises the first line of the one about Leda and the swan; Moore is 'always charmingly good-natured when one criticises, and sometimes even will be convinced.' Spent most of yesterday talking to Tom's brother [George] the philosopher. Great excitement at Trinity as the philosopher MacTaggart [sic: John McTaggart], who used to 'disapprove of marriage on metaphysical grounds, is bringing home a New Zealand hospital nurse called Daisy Bird as his wife'; he may need consolation as on his return from his year in New Zealand he will find that Moore and another [Bertrand Russell?], 'his most promising pupils and followers, have set up an entirely new and antagonistic system of the universe'. Sat at dinner at Trinity next to a science fellow [John Newport?] Langley whom he likes very much, who knows and thinks highly of [Ambrosius?] Hubrecht; Langley asked whether "[Till] Eulenspiegel" was originally written in Flanders; perhaps Grandmont knows. Has begun to learn German; finding it easier than expected in some ways, but has not yet got far. What Bessie says about women's tendency to either conceal or be overly frank about their ages seems more or less true to him; her allusion to his having had 'the benefit of women's society and friendship' amuses him, as if she wanted to make him 'a sort of Platonic and sentimental Don Juan' which he is certainly not; before her he has known very few women well, and only in one or two cases has he known them ' rather sentimentally' at some point; does not consider himself 'at all learned in women's psychology and character'. Finishing this letter in the room of a friend who has 'studied the female character far more profoundly', but since he has never fallen in love to his knowledge, Bob looks on him as his inferior.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Apologises for 'the fatness and grossness of [his] interminable epistles', written on English paper and thus costing her extra in postage; liked her pun on the 'value' of his letters. She has been more punctual in writing; warns her that if she delays writing, a 'poet may at any moment turn Satirist'; he knows enough about her to be 'dangerous' and could write about her 'behaviour in a thunderstorm perhaps'. She would have her revenge, as he is sure she has 'discovered far more follies and weak spots' in him; she always seems much wiser and sensible than him. Had tea and dinner today with the Frys; she is finishing 'a lovely clavichord' she has been painting for [Arnold] Dolmetsch; has not painted anything for two years, but this is as good if not better than anything she did before. Elodie Dolmetsch, whom they call 'Melodie', played them some Scarlatti and Purcell on the harpsichord; liked it much better than on the piano, and would have liked to see what Bessie thought. Does not necessarily prefer antique music and instruments to modern, as Fry seems to now; he is 'never happy untill [sic] he has got his orthodoxy'. Hopes that Bessie will play to the Frys; she should play Bibers [Biber] for them; they were worried that it might be too stormy to cross, but he does not think that is lightly. Does not matter that Bramine forgot to give him their letter. Glad Bessie thinks she will like "Citio" [the prospective new summer house at Doorn]; a good beginning, since he thinks she disliked Ede at the beginning, and in general takes a while to find out how much she likes something. Is still in London as his house is taking a while to be ready; a bore, since he wants to work and cannot here; the 'dreary' British Museum Library is always 'either too stuffy or too draughty'. Refreshed himself today with a Turkish bath which is 'bliss indeed'; if he were a millionaire, would spend no money on art, but would build 'magnificent baths' like those of Diocletian at Rome; Bramine and Mrs Fry would decorate the ladies' baths. Went to a music hall last night and saw a wonderful Spanish dancer. The account Bessie read of the Trafalgar Square meting was 'certainly exaggerated'. Discusses the [Second Boer] war; the 'Cape journalists and fire-eaters' got 'that idiot [Alfred] Milner into their hands' and between them have let the government into 'this awful mess'. Is going to say goodbye to Haslemere tomorrow.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Begins the letter in the National Liberal Club near Trafalgar Square, where he will soon go to an 'anti-jingo' meeting. Expects this will not be a big affair, as 'pacific people are only too few'; the 'self-satisfied Anglo-Saxon conceit gets worse and worse every year', and 'Kipling, Fashoda, Mr [Joseph] Chamberlain, and even the Dreyfus case' have contributed to it; wishes there was a 'good chance of a fiasco in the Transvaal, not so much for the sake of the Boers' but for the British; has never felt less of a patriot. Is working at the British Museum while his house is being decorated, for which [Roger] Fry has a free hand; expects the result will be 'most charming'. Glad the Frys are going to Ede; he is 'very interesting and full of ideas', though he always wants 'an orthodoxy to comfort him', not necessarily that 'of the multitude', and 'wonderfully sympathetic and imaginative'; she is 'delightful... in quite a different way to him'. Was not there when they cut into the cheese and did not send instructions, so it is now 'as dry as pumice' though they say they like it. Going to see a Japanese melodrama with them tomorrow; expects it will be 'pretty bad' but has heard the 'scenery and costumes are first rate'. Envies the Frys their trip to Holland, wishes that he could go there again so soon, and that Bessie were in the room with him now looking as he writes things he 'scarcely could put into articulate words, things which [he] dare not write now'. She would be safe, as [Charles] Sanger is away; otherwise he would be shocked, 'so mistrustful of ladies as he is wont to be'. His feelings have not changed, as he feared they may when he was away from her, and he now believes that they will not; will say no more, as he is 'not supposed to be writing [her] a love-letter', though he would if she gave him leave. Wishes they could see each other again soon; will come whenever or wherever she might say she wishes. Apologises for sending her that quote from [George] Moore [see 9/75]; meant to show her it was foolish of 'so muddle-brained a creature' as he is to try and understand such things; finds it easier to understand Moore when he talks than when he writes, as in writing he 'compresses his thought so small that it almost becomes invisible'; most philosophers 'sin' the other way. Says he sees nothing wrong in 'trying to think properly, which is all philosophy tries to do'; does not think it does imagination any harm. Could never agree with Neitsche [sic] that 'speculation is a kind of mental disease'. Quotes from Balzac ["Les Secrets de la princesse de Cadignan"] in French. Will send Bessie more books when she wants them.

Finishes the letter the day after the anti-war demonstration, which 'turned out to be antiboer', as the 'great majority of the crowd was for war'; they 'looked picturesque enough' but the meeting was dull since there was too much noise for the speakers to be heard and 'not even a decent fight'. Glad she is going to make some music with [Willem?] Witsen; asks when she starts her lessons with her new teacher in Amsterdam [Bram Eldering]. Is sorry he forgot to say goodbye [to her uncle]; they will think him vague and absent-minded, which is perhaps right. Hopes she is not worried by their suspicions; is glad Bramine [Hubrecht] is kind to her and that Bessie has taken her into her confidence. Fears there is 'only one way' [marriage] of things coming right for him. She guessed his age correctly: he turned 27 on 28 June. Guesses she is 24 or 25, but he is a bad guesser, and if she were '30 or even 40' he would not mind much, 'except that then [she] would not have as many years in this curious world'. Invites her to call him 'Bob', like his family and most intimate friends; is known in general as 'Trevy'. Now going to the British Museum to read Diodorus Siculus; he could make out he was 'very learnèd' in revenge for his confusion on saying 'something stupid about music'. Asks to be remembered to Bramine; is going to give one of her sketches to his mother. His mind is made up as to what he wants, but he can be patient 'for some time at least'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Grantchester, Cambridge. - Has come to the 'flattest part of England' he could find to get used to his 'rugged fatherland' after Holland; is staying with a 'mathematical friend' [Alfred North Whitehead] in a mill house, as his own is not yet ready. [George] Moore is here discussing 'various theories about ether and molecules of matter' with Whitehead, which Bob understands little of; Moore has also played him several of Beethoven's early sonatas, which he greatly enjoyed, though music 'passes in and out of [his] head like water through a sieve or a mill-dam'. Is going to Dorking to see his house tomorrow; does not know what he would do without the Frys to help him; bought them a Dutch cheese which he left in their London rooms but has not yet seen them; Paul [Hubrecht] helped him buy it. They had a good time at Volendam and Marken, and a good meal, but his crossing back was awful; says [the British] should not be called 'bigotted islanders' since their love for foreigners is immense enough to undergo the 'horrors' of sea-sickness. Writing with the mathematician's children 'romping and screaming' round him, so expects his letter is distracted; his head is also 'in a whirl with half-understood metaphysical notions', of which he gives a sample quote. Would 'like to be philosophical; but one cannot always get what one wants'. Is writing to Mrs Hubrecht to say how pleasant his visit was. Asks to be remembered to Bramine and Gr[andmont].

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ede; addressed to Bob at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London EC - Bob has still not given her his address in Dorking; supposes this letter will reach him in London; hopes he has a good time at Harrow, 'beat them all hollow' and not suffer any broken bones. Asks if he has given Bramine [Hubrecht]'s sketch to his mother and whether she likes it. A shame the Frys did not see the current glorious weather; she is going for long farewell walks to her favourite places in Ede; the Grandmonts are leaving on Friday, hates goodbyes. The Frys wrote a nice letter; he seems to have felt as Bob does that the Dutch 'ways of thinking & looking at things' are not so different from the British; she thought so too, and expects she could soon get to know them well; felt a little constraint when talking of Bob as she was unsure how much they knew. Asks Bob what new doctrine 'the philosopher [George] Moore' has been convincing him of; his account of 'the newly married philosopher' [J E M MacTaggart] made her laugh and would make a good subject for a story; she has often wished she could 'write a huge "life"-novel' but finds it impossible. Asked Grandmont about "[Till] Eulenspiegel", who also thought it was originally written in Flanders, but the Germans have very old manuscripts too, and it is rather like old works like "Reineke Fuchs [Reynard the Fox]" which also has an uncertain origin. Is very glad Bob is learning German. Reminds him that he said she could read some more of his "Mahabarata" [sic: "Mahabharata"] poem and some others. Bob's lost umbrella has been found and passed on to Paul [Hubrecht] as promised. They have given up the house at Doorn, "Citio", due to difficulties with the proprietor, so must search again; she, her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht], and Grandmont looked at an old country house near Haarlem on Monday, but it was too gloomy and damp.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede; envelope addressed to R. C. Trevelyan Esq-re, 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London EC - Is writing having got up very early to see the [Roger] Frys off. Curious to see which weaknesses of hers have inspired Bob to 'compile sharp satires'; does not think he has had the opportunity to get to know her faults, proved by him saying she seems to be wiser than he is and 'so sensible', though 'that is a common mistake' and her family tease her for looking like a 'wise professor'. She does not think she knows many of his weak spots, except for the very obvious ones, which are not heavy; has been very impressed by his 'excellencies & learnedness', and 'used to feel a great dunce' at Taormina though this has worn off a little. Describes the [Roger] Frys' visit: went to the Hague with Bramine to hear a concert of a cappella music conducted by [Johannes] Messchaert; returned next morning on the same train as the Frys and met at Ede station. Dreadful weather all through their visit, but they had some walks (on the second day only Mr Fry, her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht] and Elisabeth herself kept going); played them music on both nights (as Bob said, they 'liked the old music best on the whole), and yesterday morning Grandmont read them 'a great part of [Browning's] "Pippa Passes" in his translation', surprising that Mr Fry had never read it. All very sorry they had to leave so soon; the Frys promised to come again in the spring. Would very much like to get to know them better. Did not see much of what Bob says about Roger Fry's 'orthodoxy', except when he said that in music and painting, it was not possible to properly appreciate 'modern development of art' if you were not a real admirer of what has gone before; might be true of painting but she is sure it is not of music. He seemed generally to be 'a very charmingly sympathetic & very intelligent being', and she to be 'perhaps more original even, very clever certainly'; Elizabeth 'felt a dunce again'. Her uncle also liked them very much.

Last Sunday was very happy: her sister and her husband [the Röntgens] and the 'four Hubrechts from Utrecht' [Ambrosius Hubrecht and family] came for the day to say goodbye to 'Ma Retraite'; her cousin Professor Hubrecht is 'always full of fun' and it was very different from what one might imagine 'a Dutch stolid serious family party to be!' Finds it delightful to be part of such a family bond. Approves of Bob's 'plans about building public baths' but does not think the public would use them; certainly the Dutch do not wash 'their bodies as well & as often as their houses, streets, & furniture'. Tells Trevelyan how to write out a Dutch address, though there is no reason not to follow the common English custom of using English names and spelling for 'everything foreign'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Agrees with Bob that he should not come over till mid-May, and does not think her uncle seriously wishes him to come earlier; does not understand why he is having friends to stay and going visiting again if he wants to get some more work done, but is glad he is going to see them. Thinks there will be plenty of time for business or visiting; they might go to Utrecht, Amsterdam and Rotterdam, and would love to go with him to Heerde in Gelderland where her sister [Henriette] lives; will have to go there to see the children and her husband the doctor before she leaves, though her sister is probably coming to the wedding. Does not know where Bob left the bed catalogue; thinks she remembers seeing it last in Charles's room at Grosvenor Crescent; asks if they can order a softer mattress. Will measure her Dutch pillowcases tomorrow and send him the measurements; further discussion of fittings and furniture, and arrangements for packing and unpacking her things. Bob should ask his mother about what tie he should wear with his frock coat; Dutch husbands always wear white tie with their evening dress; thinks blue or green suit him if he is to choose a coloured tie. If the patent boots he wore to Roger [Fry]'s wedding are still good he can wear them again. Hopes he will soon hear from Mrs Pepper; 'what a name for a honeymoon lady!!'. Spent two nights at Almelo which were enjoyable but so hot she had difficulty sleeping; Jeanne [Salamonson Asser] very kindly tried to 'read her to sleep out of "Pilgrim's Progress"'. Then went to Amsterdam, where she helped Mien [Röntgen] arrange the flowers and table, before they went to the [Joachim] concert which was 'delightful beyond words'; they did a Haydn, Brahms and a Beethoven quartet. Then they returned for the supper party, at which '[Bob's] friend young Harold Joachim, the Oxford fellow' was present; he sat next to her at supper and seems a 'very nice fellow'; they had met once before at St Andrews when she thought him 'a strange odd person & was in great awe of him'. Thinks Harold wants her and Bob to come and see them at Haslemere when 'Uncle Jo' is staying with them; Bessie was at school with his sister. Tomorrow the quartet are in the Hague, and Harold is crossing by night so she has invited him to lunch. When healths were being drunk at the end of the meal and she went up to Joachim to touch glasses, he at once proposed 'Ihr Bräutigam' ['Your bridegroom']; he remembered that Bob's father had once taken him home in his carriage. On Tuesday she went to see her 'socialist sister [Theodora] and her husband [Herman Heijenbrock]' on their farm and enjoyed her day with them more than she had expected to; they are very happy together and she admires their convictions though they do not convince her.

Returns to the letter next day, before going to meet [Alice and Herbert] Jones. Is sure Bob would be 'amused' to meet the socialist couple, but he [Heijenbrock] does not know English so it would be no good. Then went to stay with the aunt who lives nearby; she is not a 'favourite' in their house and they do not see her often, but several of her sisters see her often; the aunt was very friendly but it is never pleasant to be there. Fortunately her daughter, Bessie's cousin, was also there. Found her uncle and aunt fairly well when she returned, but the house is in 'a horrible state' due to the repainting, and they both have a slight cold. Went to the station to meet the Jones and they did not appear; English visitors 'always change their plans at the last minute or miss trains... or don't wire in time' as is the case for the Joneses, who are now coming tomorrow. [Harold] Joachim also cannot come to lunch and is calling in the afternoon. [Joseph] Joachim is staying tonight with Mr [Nicolaas] Pierson, the Finance Minister, and his wife, who has invited Bessie to a select party this evening. Is going to the concert tomorrow night with Alice Jones; the Röntgens may also come. The cellist [Robert] Hausmann is 'a charming person, so refined and artistic'; talked to him the other night and he admired Bob's ring. Bob will get this letter when he comes up to London to see his father. She thinks he should bring any work she has not seen on their honeymoon, as they might not have much quiet time before the wedding. Understands that his 'literary ambition is not connected with [his] love' and thinks this is right. Last half page with pillowcase measurements.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Is glad Bob thinks 'as strongly about what is called English "Patriotism" just now' as they do; it is certainly 'a lamentable affair' and war seems unavoidable. Bramine [Hubrecht] was shocked when she read her Bob's wish for a 'fiasco, not so much for the sake of the Boers as for our own' as she 'feels very strongly for the Boers'. Read full account of the Trafalgar Square meeting the morning before Bob's letter came; was startled to hear he had been there as the newspaper account was nowhere near 'as dull & pacific' as he found it. Bramine has just brought her a letter from Mrs [Helen] Fry to Bob, which she should have given to him on his arrival; hopes this has not caused him or the Frys any inconvenience. Asks if the 'Japanese melodrama' was any good, and whether he is still in London. Suggests he uses foreign paper for his letters; his last was over-weight; makes a pun about his letters becoming 'too dear' for her. His letter is 'very valuable to her... whatever the future may have in store'. Wishes they could see each other more often, but does not think they should 'force circumstances'; admits she is a 'muddled creature' and does not yet see what is right and what she feels; hopes she will get clearer, while Bob is 'noble & generous & will wait', which she thinks is better for both their sakes. Discusses a line from Balzac. Will ask for more reading suggestions when she has finished the ones she wants to read; has just finished [Joseph] Joachim's biography [by Andreas Moser] and 'worship[s] him all the more'. Bob is also a 'shrewd guesser of age', as she turned twenty-four on May 21st. Always used to be thought older than she was till a few years ago when the reverse became true. Thinks it is comical how few people, especially women, are 'perfectly natural' about their age; asks if Bob has 'often had the benefit of women in society and friendship'. Last week she and her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht] went to see "Citio", at Doorn, where they are to go next summer; it is smaller than the one at Ede but nicely situated and they wil probably like it. The Grandmonts are to leave by the end of next week; the Röntgens are coming for the day next Sunday to 'say farewell to Ede. She [Mien Röntgen] was married from this house'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague'; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Sorry that Bob has a cold; he should 'choose a better way of showing [his] sympathy' with her. Discussion of comforting and sharing things with each other. Bob will have received her uncle's letter; thinks he is right to advise waiting to write to Sir Henry Howard [British ambassador to the Netherlands] until they hear from 'the Paris oracle' [Mr Barclay; see 9/40]. Hopes Bob has a good Easter with his friends; he must decide whether to go to Salisbury Plain rather than Borrowdale [for their honeymoon] as she does not know either place, and just wants the place to be 'retired from tourists... real country'. Describes Bob's enthusiasm for Flaubert and a performance by him from "La vision de St. Antoine" while they were sitting by the edge of a wood. Charming of [Bob's brothers] Charles and George to think of giving them a box to hold music. Spent a long time yesterday working on her will; it will be almost the same as her sister's. Will go to Amsterdam on Saturday if her cold is better to hear a Brahms chamber concert and have another lesson [with Bram Eldering]. Has read a great deal of "Wuthering Heights"; it is 'tremendously fierce & powerful'. Asks whether Bob has copies of certain books, if so she will leave them behind or give them to someone. The Boers have suffered a great loss with the death of Joubert; asks what the feeling is about it in England. Has had to order more photographs of Bob as she has given so many away. Scolds him for not spelling the name of the place where he lives correctly.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Addresses Trevelyan as 'my dear Bob'; is very glad to hear from him; was just last week that she left Amsterdam and he went with Paul [Hubrecht?] 'to visit Volendam and buy Dutch cheeses' but it seems a long time ago. Paul wrote a 'rather amusing & ironical account of that day'. He must have had a bad crossing as the weather has been 'most depressing ever since'; 'poor Grandmont is shivering & probably longing to get away', but the coming of Bob's friends the [Roger] Frys will keep them longer. Will miss them very much; Bramine has 'proven to be such a friend', she has told her everything and she is 'a great help'. All her family 'have a somewhat inquisitive if not suspicious turn of mind' and have begun to have suspicions about her and Bob; not in an unkind sense but they want to know 'exactly what happened or did not happen'. Her uncle, aunt, and [cousin] Marie stayed with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] in Amsterdam; is sure they compared notes. Bramine is a help to 'appease their minds'; would also help if Trevelyan wrote a 'collins' to her aunt which will make it 'all look more natural'. She and Bob must continue to be quite 'sincere and truthful' with each other, and 'everything will come right in the end'; scolds him a little for leaving the house without saying goodbye to her uncle or Grandmont, though her family found his absent-midnedness comical.

Is writing in the drawing room, hearing the 'continual tinkle tinkle of the piano' as Grandmont practises some Haydn trios. They spent at the evening recently at the house of the painter [Willem?] Witsen, where Bramine works at her etching every day; played some music and even persuaded Witsen to join them with his cello, though he is 'terribly shy and modest' he plays very well. Has been practising hard herself recently, as she wants to be in good shape if she goes to have lessons from the new teacher in Amsterdam who has replaced her old teacher [Joseph] Cramer. Asks how Bob's new house is getting on; asks its name and address, and when he will move in. He will miss the Frys at first; hopes they like the Dutch cheese, and that it will not be 'like the story of the cheese in [Jerome's] "Three Men in a Boat"'. Is reading Joachim's biography [by Andreas Moser], and has given up the Brownings' letters for a while. 'Correspondence is unsatisfactory in so many ways'; wishes she could see more of Bob, though she tells him not to 'interpret this for more than [she means] it'; tells him to write as often and fully as he can. Will try to puzzle over his 'metaphysical quotation', though doubts she will understand it entirely without further explanation; wonders about the value of such questions, though she does greatly admire 'the philosophical turn of mind' as long as it does not hamper any other enquiry. Bramine sends kind regards to Bob; she and Grandmont apparently always speak of him 'by that disrespectful name', so she supposes she may also. Notes in a postscript that he did not tell her how old he is; guesses twenty-seven.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Asks if Bob really had the vision he describes in his letter or whether he is just amusing her; talks about their ritual of 'kissing the wall' before sleep; sends a lock of her hair and asks for one of Bob's in return. Thanks him for his explanation of his sonnet in "The Speaker", which she now understands. Returns to the letter after some business over shares at the bank with her uncle, which they were both glad to finish. Discussion of post times. Foolish of "The Speaker" not to put Bob's translation in; asks if he is going to send the "[Lady's] Bat" or anything else to the "Spectator" or "Athenaeum". Discussion of arrangements for the house. Asks who Sophie, who has offered to give Bob a set of books, is; Bob ought to decide what he would like; asks if he has a complete set of Browning in Smith and Elder's edition; she does not like Meredith enough and the Frys have a set, but if Bob is a great admirer he should ask for that. Hope [Charles] Sanger feels better; asks about Bob's lease on the Temple rooms, and whether he is still keeping daily accounts or whether he has not opened his account book since they 'sat together in Charles' room one morning at Grosvenor Crescent'; does not like to nag but he must think about such things.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thanks Bob for sending "The Speaker" with her letter; likes his poem though does not feel she entirely understands it. Her uncle has taken her aunt out in a carriage for some fresh air and she feels much better for it. Spent Sunday in Amsterdam with the Röntgens who were all well and cheerful; called on [Bram] Eldering in the afternoon and arranged to have lessons once a fortnight; he seems to be 'full of fun & humour'. Yesterday went to see Louise [Hubrecht] and had a very good conversation with her; Louise thinks Maria van Hoeven should go to Ems or Wiesbaden for a few weeks for her health with a nurse, while her husband stayed at home with Bessie to look after him; afraid that her uncle and aunt will take a lot of persuading. Is writing to Bramine today to tell her their plan to marry at Whitsuntide and see if she can come. Mien [Abrahamina Röntgen] is working some beautiful sheets and pillowcases, with embroidery and her own lace, to give them as a wedding present. Bessie is also practising the viola which they brought from Leiden so she can accompany the Brahms songs with Mr Kattendijke; today he sent an etching of a Dutch landscape as a wedding present. Hopes to be able to go to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture tomorrow, then on Monday there is a Röntgen and Messchaert concert, though since Messchaert is at Wiesbaden and not yet well this might be cancelled. There is a Vondel exhibition at Amsterdam; wishes that they could go together. Asks how the Frys are. Has had a kind letter from Bob's mother, also a note from Dorothy Fletcher saying they were sorry to have missed Bob and Bessie's call.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegr[acht]; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thanks Bob for his letter. Is afraid her aunt is not as well as she first thought on her return. Has had several morning callers, including 'the old lady who used to have the snow in her head'. whose daughter would very much like to come and be their maid, and a little girl for whom Bessie once arranged a stay in the country when she was ill, bringing a wedding present she had made. The farmer from Leiden also came; her uncle is advising her to sell all her landed property before she becomes 'a foreigner' on her marriage, or she will have to pay a heavy tax to do so. Her husband has suggested that the money she gets for it should be invested in the house which her sister wants to buy. Asks if Bob has finished "Arne" [by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson?]; she has not, as she is finishing [Charlotte Bronte's] "Villette" which 'however silly & absurd in parts interests [her] immensely'. Had some bad dreams last night 'about bombs & suicides & fires in a great hall', after reading about the bombs and the fire at the Théatre Français in Paris, and the fire at the theatre in "Villette". Glad Bob saw [Thomas Sturge] Moore and had a good talk, and that he feels up to more work; he should tell her how he gets on and if her gets any more German done. Discussions of furniture and decoration for their house; asks Bob to send a sample of the green colour [Roger] Fry recommends for the drawing room. Thinks they must give up the idea of buying a new violin for the moment until she knows she can practise and get some lessons; she can always sell some shares if a valuable instrument becomes available as it would be a kind of investment, and probably more than their yearly allowance.

Her uncle and aunt have no objection to them marrying Whit week, and agree 'wonderfully' on most things about the wedding. She and Bob need two male witnesses of age settled in the Netherlands: she can have her uncle and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen and Bob can have Ambro [Hubrecht], but she cannot think of another near kinsman she would like to be present so they may need to ask [Abraham?] Bredius or another neutral. To the wedding breakfast, would like to invite on her side her uncle and aunt, the Grandmonts, Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht], all the Röntgens, the four Hubrechts [Ambro's family], Louise, and her eldest sister Marie. Asks whether any of Bob's friends would like to come, perhaps combining it with a 'little tour through Holland'. Has been cycling in the woods every afternoon, enjoying the sun but getting stiff legs; is reading a few pages of Bob's "Pilgrim's Progress" every night before going to sleep. Knows the painter [Dirk?] Jansen by name, a good teacher at the Hague Academy but she does not care for his paintings either. The Luzacs called to see her uncle and aunt when she was out; he seemed to like Bob. Likes the letter from Frank Holland which Bob sends and the present he is going to give them, as well as the lines by [Laurence] Binyon.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia. - Has received Bob's letter with his plans to leave Ravello around 26 Jan, and is delighted; her aunt is steadily improving and Bob may even find her downstairs. Her uncle has not suffered from his disturbed nights, and they now have a nurse for a couple of a hours a day to get her aunt up; they will see when Bob arrives whether she will be able to go to England on 14 Feb as his mother suggests. If he wants to 'read up about mediaeval times', he could find what he wanted at the library in the Hague and work there in the morning while she was busy; there is a 'wonderful collection of mediaeval miniatures & manuscripts' which the director [Geertrudus Cornelis Willem Byvanck], a friend of the family, would be pleased to show him. Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is much better; she and Bramine [Hubrecht] started for Taormina last Wednesday; Bob may have heard from her as Bramine wondered whether they could meet at Naples; now they will be at Rocca Bella with Grandmont. The doctor advised Tuttie should stay for three months at Taormina, so she will have to give up her work at Florence for the moment.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia. - Bob's letters arrived just as Bessie 'was preparing a little moral lecture' to him for forgetting her aunt's birthday; this was 'rather a festive day' as the doctor let her aunt get up out of bed . Difficulties of preparing food for the invalid; the cook has been a real help; she is a Roman Catholic and told Bessie she has been praying for her aunt; the other servants have also been very good. Amused her to see how Bob wrote more neatly in his letter to her aunt, at least until near the end. Envies him for succeeding in tickling a lizard; has always wanted to do so herself but they would never listen long enough to her 'whistles & singing'. Next day, writes that her uncle has gone to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture; this is the first of the series she will miss, which she is sorry for as it promised to be especially interesting, with 'a human skeleton... posed in a graceful attitude next to the lecturer's table'. Ambro came to lunch and was sorry to hear of their changed plans; suggested that his wife Marie should come and stay while Bessie is away, enabling them to keep to the old plans. Does not think this would work, as Marie would probably tire her aunt out and Bessie would not like to leave until her aunt is about the house again. Received a kind letter this morning from Bob's mother saying she quite understood and suggesting Bessie came on 14 Feb to spend a week at Welcombe; she could then go to the Frys, and then spend a few days with them in London before returning home. Must wait and see how her aunt is. Lady Trevelyan was also glad Bessie had told Bob to stay at Ravello; teases him about spending more time with his 'nine young ladies' [the Muses]. Was hard to read in Bob's letter of his plans to return by the end of next week; at least he may have better weather travelling later. Her cousin at Leiden [Louise Hubrecht] was 'charmed' by Bob's poems ["Mallow and Asphodel"] and has sent them on to the Röntgens who 'admired them very much & studied them together'; jokes how 'advantageous' it is to marry a foreign wife who will help 'spread one's fame abroad'. Looking forward very much to seeing Bob again; feels she can say anything to him; has only ever had Bramine [Hubrecht] at home to talk to in the same way, and saw very little of her. Likes the 'beautiful exquisite Blake-like imaginative drawing of the Bessie-tree' in Bob's 'intermezzo letter'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to get Elizabeth's card, as was slightly anxious about the crossing [to the Netherlands] they just escaped what seems to have been a terrible gale in the Channel on Thursday. Asks if she and Robert got her letters at the Langham; if not, Robert should write to the manager as she does not want the postal orders she sent him to be lost. Very glad Elizabeth's uncle is better and that she feels well herself. The book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] arrived yesterday; they think it 'very attractive & quaint'; Sir George will write to Robert about it. Thinks it should have some success. The title page and 'Swallow' [illustrations by Roger Fry] are very pretty; likes the poem "The [Lady's] Bat" particularly, though she does not think the picture such a success. Sends their regards to Elizabeth's uncle, cousin Marie, and all her family, and hopes she has a very happy week.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

19 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi, Italia. - Very relieved to get Bob's letter of the 31st December last night; amused that Mrs Cacciola [Florence Trevelyan] wrote three enthusiastic letters on Christmas Day, to Bob, Bessie, and Bramine [Hubrecht] and that they have all ended up in her hands; 'the dog's story' in Bob's letter very good. Would like Bob to call her 'Florence' as she asks, though she herself will never be able to think of her by that name; the letters show how kind she is 'though she comes it up so queenly in ordinary life'. Has had nice letter from Bramine, who was amused by Bob addressing her formally as 'Mrs Grandmont'; Bramine says Grandmont has not yet promised they will be in the Hague for June [the wedding] but she is sure everything will come right; Grandmont never will commit to future plans. Returns to the letter in the evening saying how tired she is, by nursing her aunt and running the household, but also because her uncle is 'so nervous these last days' and it is 'utterly exhausting to be in the house with him'. He is worried about her aunt's illness, and they have just had a letter dictated by Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht], in bed with influenza in Florence, to a nurse; Bramine is now with her.

Writes the next morning that things seem more cheerful; her aunt had a 'coughing night' but is slightly better. Had a nice letter from Bob's aunt [Anna Maria] Philips yesterday, thanking her for sending her photographs. Will look forward to seeing Bob's letter in the "Manchester Guardian"; the Salomonsons take it so she will ask her [friend Jeanne Salomonson Asser] to look out for it]. Has done hardly any reading, and no practising, for a week. At a concert on Wednesday night, heard some music by Rameau 'like delicate lace-work', then Ysaÿe playing a Bach concerto. His 'rendering was very modernised', which would have disgusted the Frys; she too much preferred a modern piece by Lalo, 'quite perfect in its way'. Hopes to go tonight to another chamber music recital, and tomorrow Lamond is performing a Beethoven sonata she would also like to hear. Her cousin Louise Hubrecht has sent her an "Inquirer" with a review of George [Macauley Trevelyan]'s book ["England in the Age of Wycliffe"] which she looks forward to reading, since she will not have time to finish the book itself before February. Is very glad that Bob is pleased with his work so far and feels 'her nine rivals' [the Muses] have him 'in their blessed power'.

Results 1 to 30 of 334