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Trevelyan, Theodore Macaulay (1906-1911) son of George Macaulay Trevelyan
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Card from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S. W. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; glad she likes Theodore [as a name for his son]; Jan is 'doing extremely well now'. Is sure that Miss [Ivy] Pretious 'could not get away', but Miss [Mary] Sheepshanks might; gives her address. Miss Sheepshanks 'certainly answers to [Bessie's] description' and is a 'very interesting person with many fine qualities both of mind & character'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad that Elizabeth has heard of some nurses who may suit her, but sorry that she has this trouble. Good that Julian is so well; she and Sir George hope to visit in October and see him. Thinks [E. M.] Forster must be interesting, since his novels are 'so clever & original', though she does not think he manages plot well. Has been reading [Myra Kelly's] "Little Aliens", about 'the little Jew children in America', which is 'pretty & funny; but quite slight'. Sorry Mr [Donald] Tovey is not progressing quickly, but it must require much work to write the music for an opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]; probably best that it will not be put on next summer, as 'the world will be simply mad over the Coronation'. George's children are 'much improved': Mary has shown no signs of temper; Theo is 'passionate occasionally' but still young, and a 'very nice boy'; [Humphry] seems quite strong now.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to have news of Paul; the photograph of him touching Theodore's foot is 'delicious'. The new MP for Hexham, [Richard Durning] Holt and his wife, are staying at Wallington, as are: Aunt Annie [Philips]; Josephine Lawson; the younger Hugh Bell, in whom Sir George has 'discovered a great likeness to [Edward] Bowen' and thinks it 'extends to character'; and Sir Francis Blake. He and Caroline are 'much interested about [Laurence] Binyon'; wonders if [Sidney?] Colvin thinks he is 'breaching on Stephen Phillips's domain'. Glad Robert liked what he saw of [Macaulay's] "Marginal Notes", which Sir George has now typed up; Longmans are going to publish it.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - News of Julian, who is well despite not having a good night's sleep according to the nurse, who has just taken him off for a drive, 'he & old Maria [the maid?] looking equally delighted'; he is getting onto his feet more now. She herself will take him to the village this afternoon. Hopes Elizabeth found all well at home; was very good to have her for such a 'long quiet visit'; if only they had not had 'the sad little tragedy' [the death of George's son Theodore]. Has heard no more from George; hopes Geoffrey Young 'is helping to console him'. Enjoyed seeing Robert very much; hopes he can settle to work now. Mrs Catt says she has not had so much pain for the last few days.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Bessie for her letter, and for enclosing Madame [Irene] Zocco's; very glad to hear 'how well and splendid Julian is ', which makes up for their sadness about the nurse's illness. Glad Julian has curls; Humphry is also 'very curly' but this is 'more out of the family line' for them. He and Mary 'play Lake Regillus and Horatius on the Museum floor' with some soldiers and some 'ancient Romans' he once got in Switzerland; she is 'very clever and sharp at the uptake'. Meanwhile Theo usually rides the rocking horse, though he looks on a little, 'and spouts the poems' [by Macaulay]. He is 'very much interested' ('much' is an insertion as 'concession to Jan's hereditary ideas of grammar') about [Donald] Tovey; takes it that his progress [on the opera "The Bride of Dionysus", to Robert's libretto] is 'slow but sure'. Must be very interesting to watch him at work. Can easily believe what she says about Forster's book ["Howard's End"], which would make it 'like all his others'; he is 'just one half of a great writer' and could do with being boiled down by 'Peer Gynt's button moulder' with 'some ordinary mechanic writer who can spin him a common likely plot'. Sends love to Bob and wishes 'success to his Solomon, and the Sage' [a reference to Bob's "Foolishness of Solomon"?].

Note from Janet offering condolences for 'poor Nurse Catt's departure'; asks to be remembered to her before she leaves.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Her baby [Humphry] has been much better yesterday and today, though he is not quite well yet. Did know about the Walker-Gordon milk, and will order it when Humphry returns to cows' milk; at the moment he is 'only having white-of-egg and water in his one bottle'. He is obviously 'very sensitive to the slightest impurity in milk' and they will have to be careful, but has stayed 'most cheerful' throughout. Thinks of Bessie and Bob 'so often & so sadly'; is sure [the death of their son Paul' 'must get worse & worse' for them. Tells her to come and see her again soon. Notes in a postscript that her other two are 'quite flourishing again'; Theo 'has been turned into a real boy, with knickers and short hair!'

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad that Mrs Enticknap got back safely; wanted her to stay till today but she did not want to travel without an escort; glad she was 'satisfied with Gussie'. Will send some fruit tomorrow and hopes it arrives in good condition; it worked for Janet, but the post is quicker there. Mary is recovering [after her miscarriage], but must stay in bed until the end of the week; she is 'very cheerful, & wants company', so it is lucky a cousin has come to stay, as Caroline found it very tiring visiting her every day. George came for three days; he is 'fairly cheerful now, but looks sadly older, & has times of silence and depression [following the death of his son Theo]'; was meeting Janet at Ellargreen [?]. Delighted to hear that Elizabeth's 'news [that she is pregnant]' is true; will be 'so good for Julian'. Knows she is always careful; Mary was 'very unwise' and it is kindest not to say too much about it. Sorry to hear that Mrs Catt still doubts she is strong enough to come as a nurse. Excited and uneasy about politics; it is a 'very serious crisis'. Hopes Mr [Donald] Tovey will soon be settled and that they have a good time with him. Going to a garden party at Hallington today. Loves the little photograph of Julian.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Is sending the nine nightgowns she promised, since 'Theo has now been promoted to flannel ones' and his happy to pass them on to his cousin Paul [not yet born]. Hopes that Bessie is still 'quite well & jolly'; she herself feels very proud going out with her 'huge double pram full of babies', getting new clothes, and enjoying life again; feels 'so superior' to Molly, Bessie, and Eleanor Acland who are 'lagging so far behind'. Hears that Caroline is going to stay with Bessie for the birth, and that 'the faithful Miss Martin' will go to Wallington; hopes that the baby will not keep Bessie waiting, as Mary did Janet. Sorry that she will not be able to visit until she is 'free of Theodore', about the end of January; encourages Bessie to arrange to come to Welcome at the same time as she and George goes, about 7 January; they have not 'stayed with the parents together' since the time at Wallington after Janet's engagement.

Letter from Charles Philips Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Rounton Grange, Northallerton. - The news [of Paul's birth] is 'most delightful'; received the telegram at a 'very late shooting lunch yesterday' so apologises for their congratulations being belated. Glad he was a boy since there is for the moment no 'duplication of "Pauline"'. Asks for more news about Bessie: how easy the birth was, and whether she is recovering properly now; more interested in this than 'the exact tilt of Paul's nose'. She had an 'annoyingly long wait' but expects she does not mind now. They are 'immensely pleased'; comments on what a 'fine crowd the 5 bairns [his own Pauline and George, George's Mary and Theo, and Paul] will make a few years hence'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Stocks Cottage, Tring. - Has received the 'little nighties', which are 'waiting for No. 3 (who is however not yet in sight!'. Is 'bursting with advice about weaning & bottles' which is very detailed, including a recommendation for Savory & Moore's baby food; suggest Bessie get Mrs Langton Hewer's "Our Baby" if she does not have it already. She herself breastfed Mary for as long as Elizabeth plans to with Paul; was not doing much good for Theo by about five and a half months old so stopped a month sooner. Asks if Bessie plans to come to Wallington in July or the beginning of August; they will be there themselves until the middle of August.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Left Rome a fortnight ago and has been settled at home for ten days, so is afraid she cannot help Bessie's 'singing friend' [Jeanne Salomonson Asser?]. Does not think she knows any musical people in Rome, and would not have thought it a very promising place to go, but expects the friend has 'good introductions'. Found it 'simply splendid' to return to her babies; Theo's talking has come on a great deal. Would love to see Paul again; thinks he looked 'too duckish' in the picture Bessie send to Caroline at Christmas; jealous that his hair seems to be curlier than Theo's. Mary is becoming 'more & more of a personage', and turns three next month; Janet exclaims she will 'soon have to be thinking about religious instruction!' Asks whether Bessie and Bob are both coming up for Donald Tovey's first concert on 12 February; would be good if they dined at Cheyne Gardens first; sure George will want to go - or she will make him want to. He returns next Friday, having had to stay on to work. Sends love to Bob and 'a kiss to the Dutchman' [Paul].

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Stocks Cottage, Tring. - Sweet of Bessie to write about the babies and their whooping cough; they have it 'quite slightly' and the doctor thinks it will last no longer than three months so she and George still hope to get to Wallington, probably towards the end of August. They are going to Robin Ghyll a week on Monday; expects the air there will do the children good. It is a 'foul disease'; 'maddening' that there is nothing to be done to help the children while they have a coughing fit, but at least they do not 'dread the next fit' as an adult would; she has a 'cressoline lamp [sic: cresolene]' which seems to be the one thing the doctors believe helps. Sorry Bessie is worried about Paul; thinks she remembers Mary losing weight in her first six months 'trotting around'; not surprising that with teething and hot weather Paul has too. Bessie's three weeks alone with him must be tiring; hopes she is 'managing not to lift him' [due to her pregnancy?] but knows that must be hard.

She and George are going to have a third child; has only been sure for about ten days; has not even told her parents or Caroline yet, but could not write to Bessie without mentioning it; at present it is 'called Janetina'. They are in the train going to see the Chelsea Pageant and dine with Sir Edward Grey; expects he is being 'extra nice to George because he doesn't want any more inconvenient letters in the "Times" about Russian Exiles!' [cf. perhaps George's letter "Personal Liberty In Russia", "Times" (London, England), Jun 23, 1908; pg. 13; Issue 38680]. Janet can 'still be quite dissipated', and has not yet had to have her evening dresses let out'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Robin Ghyll. Langdale, Ambleside. - Thanks Bessie for her letters; has wished she could see her. It is eight days since they lost him [Theodore]; it 'does somehow get better... chiefly by dint of that old steam-hammer of Dame Nature's, which goes on thump, thump, thumping the same knowledge into one's head & heart'; meanwhile 'his lovely little life is taking form & shining out more perfectly than ever', till she sometimes already feels it 'as a perfect whole, not as the piteous little broken bit it was... at first'; asks if that feeling grows, or if 'the pity of it gets ever stronger'; has often thought that Bessie, if anyone, must know [having lost her own son Paul].

Thanks Bessie for reminding her of 'that sweet little story'; remembers [her children's] 'outspoken surprise when they found [her] to be "the wrong Auntie Bessie"' very well. Dora Sanger is 'indeed a warm-hearted soul', and Eleanor Acland has written to say that 'all the Chelsea mothers & Chelsea Nannies look at each other through tears'. She and George will be at Stocks or the Cottage for at least two months, not London; thinks Bessie must 'come & make a pilgrimage among the family babies', since Molly's will also be at Watford.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Ellergreen, Kendal. - The news about Molly [her miscarriage] 'is a sad & senseless business... such utter waste'; means she will have to keep quieter in future, which she will hat;. George has been to Wallington and found Molly did 'one or two rather mad things' early one, which Caroline had been 'too discreet' to mention to Janet. Almost a relief, since such things can be avoided in the future. Gives what she thinks is Mrs Hutchins the dressmaker's address; Bessie can mention either Janet or her sister's name. Returning to Robin Ghyll this evening after staying with [Charles and Edith] Cropper for a couple of nights; Mary and Humphry are very happy there at Robin Ghyll; Mary 'has taken to bathing in a little stream close by'. Janet's 'history' is going on quite well, also her 'story of Theo'. Will be lovely to see Bessie at Wallington; looks forward to seeing Julian 'on his feet'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Sends the 'little portrait of the Stadtholder [Julian?]' she promises; asks Bessie to pass on the photograph of Humphry to Caroline. Loved Bessie's letter about 'Julian's as yet inarticulate spirits'; she shouldn't mind his speech a little late, as she herself has just had '3 Trevies together at breakfast' - George, Charles, and Mary - and her 'head is still singing with it'. Is being 'such a lady', since 'if things go all right this week & next there'll be a new little Trevy being made in this world'; is resting on the sofa, taking hansoms beyond walking distance, and 'enjoy[s] it very much' as she was 'born lazy'; gives her lots of time for writing her 'Theo book'. Good that Bob is having a nice time at Settignano; wonders whether the 'wandering William [Arnold Forster?] will ever make up his mind to start in pursuit'; he is meant to be staying with them for a night or two on the way, but she has heard nothing from him.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Very upset by Bessie's 'sad tragedy' [the death of her cousin Bramine Hubrecht at the Shiffolds]; she was a 'dear woman'; Janet had a 'charming letter' from her about Theo's death and has often wished she could see her again; she was a 'real friend' to Bessie. Wonders whether Julian realised what was going on; he is very young to be 'acquainted with death'. Bessie must be tired out; good that she had the Hubrechts [Jan Bastiaan and his wife Leonore?] with her, and 'dear little Mama', who is 'a brick always to turn up when we want her'. Wishes Bessie would come and visit them in town; does not know how much longer Bob will be away, but it is 'much too long' since they saw each other.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Has been 'thrilled to hear' of the 'final developments' about Welcombe; thinks Bessie has done great work in 'befriending the tenants and giving them security for their life-times'. Met J.J.W. [James John Withers] in the street here who told her the news; calls Welcombe the 'poor old pink elephant!' [a play on white elephant?]. Glad that Mr [Archibald] Flower has bought it: he has 'local "pull"' so may get it used for 'some reasonable purchase'. For all its ugliness, it will always remind her of Mary and Theo. Asks when Bessie will give up possession: sometimes feels sentimentally that she would like to see the house again, but expects it will not be possible, as they go to Hallington around 10 December, then she will take the 'innamorati [sic: Mary and her fiancée John Moorman' for a brief holiday in Rome. Writes a postscript after Bessie's letter to George has arrived; very glad about 'all those happy people in the cottages' [at Welcombe]; congratulates her on what must have been 'a very difficult and tedious job'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - An 'enviable description of the Azalea Paradise of dear Theodore's' [Robin Ghyll?]. Forgets how long the flowers last; they have stayed in one place this year long enough to have 'an idea of the transitoriness of flowers'; likes the 'little veronicas' increasingly. Has been seeing much of [Cecil] Knight, the head of the grammar school [King Edward VI School, Stratford]; his 'type is a very high one indeed'; he was at Pembroke College and greatly admired some 'Harrow men' who would have been Robert's contemporaries, Law and Prior. Has been reading much Plato after his recent 'great bout of Latin', and has had some 'wonderfully interesting letters from [Henry] Jackson', about Plato and himself, which Sir George finds just as interesting; he has sent him the 'Proelections' read in the Senate for the candidates for the [Cambridge] Greek Professorship in 1906: Jackson himself; Verrall; Adam, Headlam; Ridgeway. Caroline is well and strong, for her.

Welcombe House visitors' book

Signatures of visitors with dates of their visits. Entries for 1897-1901 written on pasted-in sheets [from another book?]. Dates of deaths of Paul and Theodore Trevelyan written in by the entries for their last visits.

Newspaper cutting [from the "Times", Monday, June 6, 1910, p.8] regarding a visit by Theodore Roosevelt to Shakespeare's birthplace, Stratford on Avon. Found in the book by the signatures of Roosevelt's party marking their stay from 4-6 June.

'R.C.T. - E.T.' written at the top of the page for 1928, the year of Caroline Trevelyan's death and her son Robert's inheritance of the house. Date of sale of house, 22 Nov 1929, entered. Visit of Julius Röntgen, 28-31 1930, marked by two bars of music beneath his signature.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Janet and the babies [Pauline and Theodore] arrived yesterday evening; George and Charles are taking a walk for a couple of days, in 'glorious' weather. The old farmer was found drowned in Fallowlees Loch on Friday. The 'patients' in the local area are all getting better, except for one poor child who has died; they are keeping up strict quarantine; has been much worried about it, but is sure they have done the right thing and that 'everyone is helping to prevent the spread of the disease'. Hopes Robert is 'quite right again'. Sent a melon yesterday; asks if the grouse she sent arrived or were spoiled by the heat. Asks if Elizabeth has heard about a nurse; Janet has a 'nice looking nurse maid'. Theodore is a 'very fine big intelligent boy, but not pretty'. Asks how the road [to the new house] is getting on.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Has returned from a busy time in London; glad to see Elizabeth and Robert's letters to her and Sir George. Saw George, Janet, and the babies, who are 'very sweet'; also Mary, who is 'wonderfully well' and may have her baby at any time; the nurse is in lodgings nearby. They have been trying to settle their winter plans; asks if the 27 or 28 [November] would be a good time to visit, after her Comm[itt]ee meeting on the 27th. Asks how long Elizabeth's sister will stay. Will then return to Wallington for a week; they think they will come south before Christmas. Hope it will be fine for Sir George's shoot tomorrow; several people cannot come because of Parliament, but he has Humphry Ward, John T[revelyan?], and T. Taylor; Dorothy [Ward?] and several neighbours are also coming.

Does not think the women who have been imprisoned [for militant suffrage campaigning] are 'hysterical'; believes they arranged the '"demonstration"' and were sent to prison as they intended. Difficult to say what she thinks of such tactics: in many ways 'it does harm, decidedly; but in others it forwards the cause', keeping the subject alive as less dramatic campaigning cannot do, and arousing 'a great deal of sympathy among labour people'. Does not approve of their methods, but is reluctant to condemn them as she is 'not ready to suffer [herself] for the cause, in the way they are doing'. The [Women's Liberal] Federation are 'very much alive' and were busy from eleven till six on Tuesday; good to see so much energy. Is looking forward to seeing so much of Elizabeth and Robert. A postscript notes that she is 'ordering a piece of Toasting Cheese to be sent'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens. - Sorry not to have seen more of Bob and Bessie yesterday, but had a deadline to finish some work, and then 'Desmond [MacCarthy] made us miss our train'. Would come to visit, 'but for the uncertainty of when our family event here [the forthcoming birth of his and Janet's son Theodore] will be'; thinks he should wait until after that, but asks if they will be at the Shiffolds in July. Goldie [Dickinson]'s speech, as well as [Robin] Mayor's, Bob's, and 'perhaps Bertie [Russell]'s' [at the Apostles dinner] were 'great', especially Mayor's; would 'scarcely have thought Robin had it in him', though there are 'traditions of his great vice-president speech'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Reached London at noon yesterday, went to a sub-committee meeting, then returned home to get tea ready for Sir George; very good to see him again and he seems well. He is 'distressed' she has not 'seen [Elizabeth] through to the crisis [giving birth]'. They think she had better go to Welcombe with him unless they hear from Elizabeth tomorrow morning; she can easily come to Surrey from there if she is wanted. Pantlin is to go in to a home of Dr Thorne's as she would not get into a hospital for a long time, so Carter will go to Welcombe with Caroline. Charlie visited this morning and will dine with them; Janet came to lunch, her nurse has had influenza; she is weaning Theodore now and goes to Stocks this week and Welcombe on 7 January. Charlie and Sir George 'very glad that the Lords are negociating' but she is 'not so well pleased'. Has very much enjoyed spending so much time with Elizabeth and Robert; knows their 'home and friends and surroundings' very well now. Sends best regards to Miss Noel.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Delighted to have the news of the birth of Elizabeth and Robert's son; wants to know how much he weighs and so on; hopes the labour was not too hard. Wonders if Robert 'has ventured to hold the baby'; he must start when it is small. The hounds [the local hunt] have been here this morning and she and Sir George went out to them; looked 'very pretty'. Asks whether they have decided the baby's name is to be Paul; Sir George likes it. Amusing to think of the 'three boy cousins' [with Theodore and George Lowthian Trevelyan] so close in age.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sure Elizabeth is glad to be in bed in this cold weather, though since there was sunshine yesterday and today she and Sir George have taken some walks. The nurse has kindly written a long letter with much she wanted to know about Elizabeth and Paul. Is very glad to hear the nursing [breastfeeding] has begun so well; Mary and Pauline were both 'troublesome' though the boys [Theodore and George Lowthian] were not. Longs to see Elizabeth and Paul but must wait, as both she and Sir George are going to be careful not to catch chills. Has been busy with the accounts, and has 'embarked on another large Vol. of Sorel'. Asks if Elizabeth has had visitors yet; sure Miss Noel will be delighted. Janet is coming on 7 January, and her mother the next day; 'rather alarmed' at the thought of having Mrs Ward for 'two whole days'. Asks if Paul has been out yet; likes the idea of him 'being carried up and down the Tannhurst [sic: Tanhurst?] Terrace which is so sheltered & sunny'. Long holiday at Stratford, with Christmas, bank holiday and local holiday; there has been tobogganing on the hill behind the house, and the pond will soon be frozen enough for skating.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Robin Ghyll, Langdale, Ambleside. - Thanks Bob for his writing, and for going to Swanage [due to the fatal illness of George and Janet's son Theo]; sorry this journey was 'in vain'. Did not write or wire to Bob as he knew he would have left the reading party for Will [Arnold Forster]'s and did not know where that was. [Theo's death] is a 'very great blow indeed' to George and Janet, but Bob and Bessie's courage at that which reduced them 'from the state of having offspring to the state of having none at all' [the death of their son Paul] is an 'example'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to hear Julian has gained so much weight, and that Elizabeth has recovered her strength so quickly. Interesting that Elizabeth's sister and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen are coming. She and Sir George are leaving this morning 'in truly patriarchal fashion' since the 'Chelsea nursery' [George and Janet's children: Mary, Theodore and Humphry] join them at the station. Is thinking of Paul today: believes they will 'see him in Julian', who will therefore be 'doubly precious'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Was judging at the Exhibition on Saturday; 'Sunday we went to Church!'; Sir George read his chapter to her for two hours on Monday. Elinor Middleton, Kenneth Swan and 'M. Burnett' have been staying with them; tomorrow it is the tenants' party. Sir George was very pleased to have Julian's photograph; intends to come to see him in the autumn. Theo and Humphry have had measles and are recovering; Mary shows no sign of it; the children's visit may be delayed a little but George comes on the 31st. The [Henry Yates] Thompsons visit soon. Pleased to have good news of Julian; would like to see a photograph of him in the donkey cart. Hopes they are enjoying Mr [Donald] Tovey's visit and that he is better.

Continues the letter after having been interrupted by Mary and her guests Mr and Mrs Runciman, then 'the children with the poney [sic]'; Pauline is 'beginning to ride nicely'. Has read Rosalind Murray's "The Leading Note", which is 'nice and simple, but a girl of that age does not know enough to write a novel'. Hopes Robert is enjoying having 'Ariadne clothed and adorned [by Tovey's composition of the score of "The bride of Dionysus"].

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